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Pork Tenderloin


JLK
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Help! I'm a giant stress-case for a variety of work-related reasons.

In my fridge, there's a very nice pork tenderloin, begging to be cooked. I don't have lots of time to shop for fancy ingredients or fuss with the cooking, and I leave on a business trip tomorrow which means the thing MUST BE COOKED TONIGHT. :)

What is a nice, tasty, simple preparation using this cut? Remember, I'm a novice in the kitchen who is still just figuring things out. I don't want to rush in sans recipe or plan and end up making the pork inedible because I used the wrong type of heat, spicing, etc.

Thanks!

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Like, one of those cute skinny pork tenderloins that come two to a cryovac at Safeway, or one of those twine-wrapped fire logs bound with butcher's twine?

Porc Stephanie:

Pork

Apples

Cream

Sage

Wine

Shallots

Mustard

If it's of reasonable girth, slice the loin lengthwise, stuff it with chopped apples and sage until it looks right (not too thick), re-roll it, salt and pepper the liberally, and brown it on high heat on the oven top. Twine helps, but isn't critical.

Turn the oven on to 300 or so. When the oven is hot and the loin is brown, shove the whole sautee pan into the oven.

In the mean time, in a small pan, melt maybe a tablespoon and a half of butter and sautee a shallot or some very finely chopped onion until clear. Splash a couple of glurgs of white wine (a quarter cup?) in, and reduce by 2/3.

Take off the heat and let the pan cool for a bit.

Check the pork with a meat thermometer, if you have one. You're looking for about 145 degrees. This could take a while.

Pour in what appears to be an unhealthy quantity of cream on top of the cool-ish wine and shallots. Maybe a cup. Bring the heat back up and boil the cream until reduced by at least a third -- boiling Elmer's glue is a bad image, but it gives you some idea of what to look for. Take off the heat. Stir in mustard to taste. If you have the whole grain mustard, it makes you feel very European, but Dijon or, likely, any old deli mustard will do the trick.

Check the pork again. If still underdone, drink some of the wine and watch Seinfeld reruns for a bit.

Once you get 145 (150 if you're queasy about pork) let the meat sit for 20 minutes in the pan, "tented" with a bit of foil. If there are crusty bits (but not burned) in the bottom, feel free to scrape them off with the help of that wine, and add them to the sauce (cook the wine down as much as possible before adding to the sauce, so it doesn't get runny). Warm the sauce, slice the pork and put them together in an artistic and delicious assemblage.

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A "go to" recipe at Chez Dente is saltimbocca with pork tenderloin (the skinny kind, I believe the fire log that Waitman refers to is just called a loin) instead of traditional veal.

You'll need:

A pan

Your tenderloins

Fresh sage

A few slices of prosciutto

About a cup of madeira

Toothpicks

Cut the tenderloin into individual "burgers" if you will and top each with a sage leaf (or two if they're small), and then a folded over slice of prosciutto (folded so it's the same size as your piece of pork). Thread a toothpick through the prosciutto, into the pork, and back out again so that the thing holds together.

Heat up a pan on medium heat, add some canola or grapeseed oil, and start searing your pieces of pork on each side. You should be able to cook them through if the temp is right, but if you want, you can throw your (hopefully ovensafe) pan in the oven at 375 for a while until done.

Now my favorite part. When the pork is done, take it out of the pan, and pour your madeira into the hot pan. Scrape up all the little brown bits into your sauce and let it reduce until it gets kinda syrupy. Pour over your pork and serve.

Edited by Al Dente
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If you are in a real hurry and don't have anything but white wine, Dijon mustard, and cream, then you are in luck. Salt and pepper that bad boy, and sear it all over in an oven-proof skillet (cast iron is great). Then, throw it in the oven (in the pan, of course) and continue cooking at 350 for 20 minutes or so. Put the meat aside, deglaze the pan with the wine, and a tablespoon or so of mustard, cook it all down, add cream and cook some more. You will, of course, be tasting this as you go, so add more mustard, S&P or cream you think necessary. Slice, plate, and pour sauce over. (If you have some chicken stock on hand, add it to the pan before putting in the oven.)

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Hardy-har-har-har. LMAO. If I were cooking for el hombre, I'd have specified low salt recipes. This was just for me. :)

Waitman's recipe won (for tonight), and wow. Wow! Love it. Easy stuff too. I hope I'm as lucky as Mrs. B someday and have a great dish named after me. Dare to dream...

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I'm a little late to the party here, but this is a quick, simple, and easy recipe (yes, it's a Rachael Ray 30 minute meal, but a good one) for Cuban Spiced Pork Tenderloin. I've made this many times for many different people and always get raves about it. (never made the accompanying rice)

It's perfect for those skinny, 2-in-a-pack tenderloins, and makes for great leftovers (Cuban sandwiches....). It's also been the only use for the Montreal steak seasoning in the jumbo Costco-size container that found its way into my cabinets after a family visit.... :lol:

Edited by goldenticket
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Handling question:  I purchased a tenderloin (that two-to-a-pack kind) on Saturday.  Was supposed to cook it tonight, but am feeling awfully tired.  Is it too late to freeze it?

No, and make sure to wrap very well.

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I have a silly or novice question.  Do the tenderloins need to be rinsed off and then patted dry after removing from the package?

I would not say they need to be rinsed and dried, but it is something that I do whenever I remove any meat from its packaging.

Edit to add that one of the reasons why you would want to at least dry the meat is that it will help it from sticking if you are cooking it in a pan. Also, if you do not dry the meat it will be difficult to form a nice crust on the meat.

Edited by Sthitch
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I don't think you'll be disappointed - this recipe has been a real crowd-pleaser! And the leftovers (whether in sandwiches or just eaten cold out of the fridge) are definitely an added bonus.

I haven't really dried/rinsed the tenderloin before making this, but it shouldn't hurt. You slather the tenderloins in olive oil and that makes the coating stick.

Enjoy! and let us know how it turns out :lol:

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I'm a little late to the party here, but this is a quick, simple, and easy recipe (yes, it's a Rachael Ray 30 minute meal, but a good one) for Cuban Spiced Pork Tenderloin.  I've made this many times for many different people and always get raves about it.  (never made the accompanying rice)

It's perfect for those skinny, 2-in-a-pack tenderloins, and makes for great leftovers (Cuban sandwiches....).  It's also been the only use for the Montreal steak seasoning in the jumbo Costco-size container that found its way into my cabinets after a family visit.... :lol:

Have ingredients. Will be trying this evening. It sounds YUMMY!

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