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The Trite Food List

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Hey now, looks like yer right smarty pants. funny thing is when you buy them from the purveyor they send you a mixed box-labeled nasturtium. apparently nasturtium is orange. pansies come in many colors. other than that, same shit. I should have said "edible flowers"

What is the "natural habitat" of Kimchi I wonder...

IHTTAALY

Nasturtiums come in many different colors.

The natural habitat for kimchee it is quite large and varied, but does not include pizza or hotdogs.

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The natural habitat for kimchee it is quite large and varied, but does not include pizza or hotdogs.

Sounds like poor combo rather than tripe. I really enjoy a lobster roll with kimchi, but I'm Asian and I love Chinese pickled veggies and stinky tofu.

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Sounds like poor combo rather than tripe. I really enjoy a lobster roll with kimchi, but I'm Asian and I love Chinese pickled veggies and stinky tofu.

Something can be good and still be trite - kimchi is moving into the pork belly/bacon territory of things overuse to the point of triteness.

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I would say that over the past two or three years, the number of servers that I have heard say, "Everything is better with bacon!" would likely be in the dozens. Some things are indeed better with bacon, but other things (like a bacon martini that I had at Restaurant 3 once) are most definitely not.

Please note that I pretty much loved everything that I ever ate at Restaurant 3, but the bacon martini was not one of them.

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Something can be good and still be trite - kimchi is moving into the pork belly/bacon territory of things overuse to the point of triteness.

As is the wildly overrated Sriracha, a garbage hot sauce that can't even spell things correctly on their label.

Yes, I like it, but it is trite, and 20-something chefs are using it everywhere (along with kimchi).

That said, typing this is literally making me salivate for a good, spicy bowl of pho.

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As is the wildly overrated Sriracha, a garbage hot sauce that can't even spell things correctly on their label.

Real Sri Racha sauce (from Thailand, where the town of Sri Racha is located and where the sauce was invented) is much better than the rooster version, which is made by Vietnamese in California.

Shark brand and Sriraja Panich are both really good brands. Ingredients are fresh chilli, water, sugar, fresh garlic (not garlic powder like the rooster), salt and vinegar. No preservatives or anything else and the type of chilli is different from the red jalapenos used in the American version. It is sweeter, but also hotter if you get the bottles labeled "strong". The flavor is much more balanced. I believe it's aged briefly as well.

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As is the wildly overrated Sriracha, a garbage hot sauce that can't even spell things correctly on their label.

Yes, I like it, but it is trite, and 20-something chefs are using it everywhere (along with kimchi).

That said, typing this is literally making me salivate for a good, spicy bowl of pho.

I must be behind the curve, because I've been ensorcelled with this Sriracha mayo sauce* lately, here squeezed onto a flatbread pizza with pesto, sausage and caramelized onions.

8732643838_cc25d63738.jpg

... and eggs, melts of many kinds, grilled chicken, fried shrimp...

*recipe recently requested from a 20-something chef :lol:

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Nasturtiums come in many different colors.

The natural habitat for kimchee it is quite large and varied, but does not include pizza or hotdogs.

Not blue. Indeed Kimchee does not belong on pizza, hot dogs go on pizza. I imagine that Kimchi could be quite good on a hot dog however, Kraut is fermented cabbage, just not spicy. Slaw is cabbage, seems to me hot dogs and cabbage are pals.

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I'm afraid at this point, "wood fired and brick oven" pizze, or is it pizzas, may very well be trite, certainly hackneyed, especially in DC where they seem most often to be made by low wage immigrants with no real interest in the craft.

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I'm afraid at this point, "wood fired and brick oven" pizze, or is it pizzas, may very well be trite, certainly hackneyed, especially in DC where they seem most often to be made by low wage immigrants with no real interest in the craft.

Whoa. Wow.

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perhaps Etto will change this. (and I meant nothing against the low wage immigrants, everybody has to make a living.)

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Bacon has gone beyond trite, and is now something other than that.

I saw an ad on the side of a bus this morning for "Cheff Geoff's Bacon Bar"

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Sriracha mayo and bacon are perfect foils to cover up otherwise lazy cooking with fat, heat and/or salt. If they're all over the menu, more than anything I consider that a red flag that it's quite likely a sloppy kitchen.

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Sriracha mayo and bacon are perfect foils to cover up otherwise lazy cooking with fat, heat and/or salt. If they're all over the menu, more than anything I consider that a red flag that it's quite likely a sloppy kitchen.

An addendum: if bacon is beyond trite, what is applewood-smoked bacon?

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An addendum: if bacon is beyond trite, what is applewood-smoked bacon?

delicious, trite or not.

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^ Possible non-sequitur alert, but I've been thinking about this one lately. Where are they getting all this apple wood? How many more apple trees can there be that are ready to be cut down?

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recently, i came across a menu that included a description of the dish with "oven roasted bacon"....

perhaps that's not apt for a trite list. but it certainly is for the bullshit list, which i think would be much more fun to read through.

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recently, i came across a menu that included a description of the dish with "oven roasted bacon"....

perhaps that's not apt for a trite list. but it certainly is for the bullshit list, which i think would be much more fun to read through.

I think it's a subset of trite food. The bacon is cooked before served, as I assume it is in the vast majority of applications and describing the manner in which you cooked it?

So what? Who cares? Can anyone tell oven roasted bacon from pan fried bacon from bacon cooked in cow fart fumes?

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recently, i came across a menu that included a description of the dish with "oven roasted bacon"....

perhaps that's not apt for a trite list. but it certainly is for the bullshit list, which i think would be much more fun to read through.

I think it's a subset of trite food. The bacon is cooked before served, as I assume it is in the vast majority of applications and describing the manner in which you cooked it?

So what? Who cares? Can anyone tell oven roasted bacon from pan fried bacon from bacon cooked in cow fart fumes?

Check out The Spare Me Book.

AKA the cow fart fume thread.

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^ Possible non-sequitur alert, but I've been thinking about this one lately. Where are they getting all this apple wood? How many more apple trees can there be that are ready to be cut down?

Trees get pruned every year, and in commercial orchards are replaced after a decade or so, when they are less productive. Since the wood is sold for smoking as chips and chunks, it all gets used--small branches to whole trees.

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Actually, in all seriousness, oven-roasted bacon is a good thing. At least if it is done in the way ATK recommends, it is my understanding there is less fat absorbed, but that could just be my memory justifying it. ;)

And it is quite tasty and crispy. Also easier to clean up as you don't have to deal with fat splatter all around the stove. We've used the ATK oven roast method for years, though we don't really make bacon at home any more. Can't really see the benefit on a menu unless my memory IS correct and the fat grams are fewer...

I think it's a subset of trite food. The bacon is cooked before served, as I assume it is in the vast majority of applications and describing the manner in which you cooked it?

So what? Who cares? Can anyone tell oven roasted bacon from pan fried bacon from bacon cooked in cow fart fumes?

my point wasn't so much that there is a problem with cooking bacon in an oven. it's big time saver and very practical. the problem is with the manner in which someone decided a dish would sound more appealing if they included the words "oven roasted" to "bacon" in the description.

it's a superfluous gesture and it doesn't provide any helpful information for the diner because true to Monavano's point, bacon is basically going to taste like bacon regardless of how it's cooked. cow fart fumes, however, are a very serious source of methane gas (a potent greenhouse gas that is thea source of climate change). so if bacon were cooked using methane sourced from a cow, i'd be totally down with this. *that* would be a useful dish description.

i suppose this is more appropriate for the Spare me thread.

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"I'm having the pasta dish with bacon"

"OK"

"The bacon is oven roasted, so..."

"Holy Hell! Why didn't you say so in the first place? I'll have what he's having!".

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"I'm having the pasta dish with bacon"

"OK"

"The bacon is oven roasted, so..."

"Holy Hell! Why didn't you say so in the first place? I'll have what he's having!".

Basically all that description does is tell the diner the means by which the bacon fat is rendered, which doesn't seem like the most highly useful information. This description in a restaurant makes me think they're just taking advantage of how they may cook bacon anyway, since it's probably most efficient for them. So they figure they've got a win-win.

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Real Sri Racha sauce (from Thailand, where the town of Sri Racha is located and where the sauce was invented) is much better than the rooster version, which is made by Vietnamese in California.

Shark brand and Sriraja Panich are both really good brands. Ingredients are fresh chilli, water, sugar, fresh garlic (not garlic powder like the rooster), salt and vinegar. No preservatives or anything else and the type of chilli is different from the red jalapenos used in the American version. It is sweeter, but also hotter if you get the bottles labeled "strong". The flavor is much more balanced. I believe it's aged briefly as well.

Serious Eats just published the results of their Sriracha taste test. They agreed with you about Shark (came in second to another Thai brand named Polar), but disagreed concerning Sriraja Panich. I am sure that if the rankings were done by someone who is Thai or steeped in Thai food the results might be different.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/taste-test-the-best-sriracha.html?ref=title

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