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Using Accent in a MSG


DonRocks
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On a tangent, I just wrote this post, and am "aware" that I left out the circumflex in Chateau, but I think accenting foreign words can come across as exceedingly pretentious, even though it may be done in an attempt to be correct. It seems like there's a fine, multi-dimensional line between using diacritical marks (a pretentious term that I just used for no other reason than to be pretentious) for pretense, for correctness, or for clarification (e.g., sauté instead of saute). I suspect Leigh will have something to say about this subject.

On my way out now for a bowl of phở.

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On a tangent, I just wrote this post, and am "aware" that I left out the circumflex in Chateau, but I think accenting foreign words can come across as exceedingly pretentious, even though it may be done in an attempt to be correct. It seems like there's a fine, multi-dimensional line between using diacritical marks (a pretentious term that I just used for no other reason than to be pretentious) for pretense, for correctness, or for clarification (e.g., sauté instead of saute). I suspect Leigh will have something to say about this subject.

On my way out now for a bowl of phở.

Which I would totally write as "pho," you pretentious twit. :)

I use them when I know, from being fluent enough with the language in question, that it does make the difference between two different words -- but that's already an inexact approach, because I (by my own criterion) can't do it for language with which I am not familiar enough to make that distinction. And I will happily leave them all off if I'm using a computer on which I can't find the symbol or keystroke to insert them. I rarely bother with a cédille*, for example, and if I were to use an entire phrase in a foreign language, I'd italicize it (per MLS and CMS style), at least the first time it's used.

Mostly, for me, it's that using French diacritical marks has become second nature (I used to type as fast in French as in English, and am now only slowed down by, again, not knowing where all the diacriticals are on the keyboard). Also, when I edit something that uses French, I have to make sure they're there and correct, so it's become more a matter of habit than anything else.

*Nope, totally didn't need to put the accent aigu in there. ;)**

**Because English so rarely uses accents, I even think of them by their French names; it didn't even occur to me to call this a "cedilla" or say "acute accent."

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I put them in because, if I omit them, I hear the echoes of twenty years' worth of language teachers and graduate advisors telling me to put them in. I am aware that this is a personal problem that could, most likely, be resolved with therapy and/or medication.

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Just wanted to give a thumbs up for the title. Pretentious? Perhaps. Clever? Definitely.

A top 10 thread title in my book! To get on topic, I don't know how to put any of those thingies on-over-or-attached-to any of the letters, so I never do. I also don't know how to properly use a semi-colon, unless I do this ;)

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Some leave acccents out, from sheer slackitude.

Some always include accents, as an expression of OCD.

Some do whatever, to enjoy the obscurantism (Hi, Don !).

At least the interest in parsing the finer points of the Korean characters on Korean menus has faded some.

I just could not keep up.

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Some leave acccents out, from sheer slackitude.

Some always include accents, as an expression of OCD.

Some do whatever, to enjoy the obscurantism (Hi, Don !).

At least the interest in parsing the finer points of the Korean characters on Korean menus has faded some.

I just could not keep up.

Yes.

Now, I have go to the National Archives Air and Space Museum and research the Battle of Prexnak. B)

And despite this being the first time I've ever heard of this word, I'm pretty sure it would be obscurantisme in French.

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Hate to party poop, but the title of the thread should be "an MSG," not "a MSG" (partly has to do with the fact that MSG is an initialism, not an acronym).

OK OK -- it depends on whether it's the white stuff or "message." Goes back to initialism vs. acronym. Or was that an abbreviation?

I vote for the white stuff. Although I prefer fish sauce, to put an Ac'cent on it.

Time to go -- I have about the chance of a Ferengi in this exchange.

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When borrowing and using foreign words, there is no reason to neuter diacritics unless you are a clumsy editor at the Washington Post or the variety of person who foregoes the seemingly mandatory and pretentious use of chopsticks with Eastern grub, which often demands more dexterity than check-marking the “United States-International” setting on the language bar at the bottom right of any personal computer and literally pressing 1 or 2 punctuation keys with a single finger on a keyboard that is far larger than that of any umbilical cell phone.

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I have no dog in this fight, but feel strangely compelled to post this...

Vincent: All right. Well, you can walk into a movie theater in Amsterdam and buy a beer. And I don't mean just like in no paper cup, I'm talking about a glass of beer. And in Paris, you can buy a beer at McDonald's. And you know what they call a Quarter Pounder with Cheese in Paris?

Jules: They don't call it a Quarter Pounder with Cheese?

Vincent: Nah, man, they got the metric system. They wouldn't know what the fuck a Quarter Pounder is.

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When borrowing and using foreign words, there is no reason to neuter diacritics unless you are a clumsy editor at the Washington Post or the variety of person who foregoes the seemingly mandatory and pretentious use of chopsticks with Eastern grub, which often demands more dexterity than check-marking the “United States-International” setting on the language bar at the bottom right of any personal computer and literally pressing 1 or 2 punctuation keys with a single finger on a keyboard that is far larger than that of any umbilical cell phone.

Language bar? Sorry, never seen one on any pc or mac I've used. Maybe I can order a beer there? In English?

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Can't spell "Häagen-Dazs®" without the umlaut (or whatever that thingy is).

Look up your favorite dingbats by searching for "character map" or call up your geeky friend who has memorized the ASCII codes.

If there was an umlaut over ümlaut, what would occur during molecular orgasm in zero gravity?

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