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Yu-Ling Sauce


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Following in the footsteps of Yum Yum Sauce, I recently looked at the menu of Foong Lin and noticed Yuling duck. Not knowing what that was, I began to Google for it, and have found that Yu-ling sauce (or Yuling sauce) appears to be a regional accompaniment for roast duck: The vast majority of restaurants using it are from in-and-around the Washington, DC area. But other than mentioning that it's a "house-special sauce," nobody mentions what it is! So what is it? And does anyone make a version that's worth trying?

Cheers,

Rocks.

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There is a Chinese Restaurant near the corner of Lee and Glebe (Hunan Village?) that my wife and I used to order from at least once a week and Yuling Duck was one of their specialties. Fairly typical Chinese style roast duck with the sauce which was a nice accompaniment.

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Did anyone ever figure this out?

I've seen yu-ling duck (no sauce) and duck with yu-ling sauce.

WTF?

Sort of. The problem I am having is in the Chinese character translation. Once I find it then I can explain it better. I think it's more the style of cooking duck, rather than an actual sauce. I will have to do more research, but it's similar to confit, where the duck is cooked in its own fat or oil to get it crispy. The "yu" should be "you" meaning oil, in this case, I believe. Which could be why you see sauce on some and not others. Will report back after further investigation.

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Could it be 油淋鴨? 油 means oil, 淋 means sprinkle and 鴨 means duck. 油淋鷄 (Yuling Chicken) is more poppular in Korea, though. The sauce includes soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, sesame oil, chopped scallion, chopped garlic, ginger and Chinese wine or Sake.

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More likely, it's a corrupted transliteration of Yu Lin (玉林 ?), a neighborhood of Chengdu, capital of Sichuan, apparently famous for its crispy chicken dishes.

On a tangential aside, it turns out that there's now a "National Sauce Culture Museum of China" here in Hangzhou, but I didn't have time to check it out...and in any case, it's about prepared sauces. Instead, we drank the local Dragon Well (longjing) tea, brewed with water from the legendary Dreaming of the Tiger spring. Memorably grassy.

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