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#1 plunk

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 02:19 PM

[ Cleveland ]
My wife and I are going there this weekend, and we're pretty unfamiliary with the town. We'd appreciate recommendations for:

1) Road food along the way (traveling from D.C. - I70 to I76 to I80).

2) Any "must eats" while there, preferably of the "non-haute" variety. We'll be there for a big family get-together, so culinary/gastronomic diversions will have to be kept to the quick and cheap variety. I'd be particularly interested in any stereotypical food for the Cleveland area, as off the top of my head, I cannot think of anything.

Thanks for the help!



#2 Joe H

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 03:18 PM

There really isn't any. Remarkably, there is an excellent Cambodian restaurant, Pnomh Penh, which you would expect to find here, NY or L. A. but it's in Cleveland and genuinely very good for what it is. Lake Perch may be the only indigenous dish that comes to mind, particularly deep fried; Blue Point in the Warehouse district is Cleveland's best seafood restaurant-but it's expensive. Think Black's or Kinkead's. There must be someplace there that does Friday night fish frys but none comes to mind.
The western suburb of Vermillion has a genuinely excellent and atmospheric (i.e. brick wall and stone walls, beamed ceiling, planked wooden floor) called Chez Francois ( http://www.chezfranc...es.php?cat_id=5 has several photos of the rooms. ) . I realize this is not what you are looking for but it is outstanding and you may want to plan for this on a future visit.

If you're into Rock and Roll, don't miss the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Well worth going out of your way for with the best record shop I have ever been in. Plus, Cleveland's downtown will surprise you. This city has come a long way!

Edited by Joe H, 28 August 2006 - 03:22 PM.


#3 plunk

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 03:34 PM

There really isn't any. Remarkably, there is an excellent Cambodian restaurant, Pnomh Penh, which you would expect to find here, NY or L. A. but it's in Cleveland and genuinely very good for what it is. Lake Perch may be the only indigenous dish that comes to mind, particularly deep fried; Blue Point in the Warehouse district is Cleveland's best seafood restaurant-but it's expensive. Think Black's or Kinkead's. There must be someplace there that does Friday night fish frys but none comes to mind.
The western suburb of Vermillion has a genuinely excellent and atmospheric (i.e. brick wall and stone walls, beamed ceiling, planked wooden floor) called Chez Francois ( http://www.chezfranc...es.php?cat_id=5 has several photos of the rooms. ) . I realize this is not what you are looking for but it is outstanding and you may want to plan for this on a future visit.

If you're into Rock and Roll, don't miss the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Well worth going out of your way for with the best record shop I have ever been in. Plus, Cleveland's downtown will surprise you. This city has come a long way!

Thanks for the advice. Actually, a fish fry sounds quite good. I spent a summer in Western Michigan and miss some good ol' fried perch (I prefer it pan fried, though).

#4 Joe H

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 10:07 PM

Thanks for the advice. Actually, a fish fry sounds quite good. I spent a summer in Western Michigan and miss some good ol' fried perch (I prefer it pan fried, though).

You won't believe this link but.... http://www.cleveland...fish/index.html

Enjoy!

#5 KOK

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 07:54 AM

A trip to the Westside Market (kind of like Lexington Market in Baltimore) is always in order. The Nauti Mermaid in the warehouse district had good food in a very casual setting.

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#6 liam

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 07:59 PM

A visit to Cleveland would be incomplete without stopping by Lolita, home of the closed but soon to be reopened Lola, written about in Michael Ruhlman's A Soul of A Chef. Lolita is a self-described casual, Mediterranean-style bistro. There's a whole thread on eGullet about it.

Chef Michael Symon (of Lola and Lolita) was named one of Food & Wine's Best New Chefs in 1998. He has recently opened a restaurant called Parea in New York City as well.

#7 Adam23

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 01:14 PM

I don't know if there are any must eats. I'd definately check out West Side Market as someone mentioned.

If chinese is your thing, C&Y on 21st and St. Clair (Cleveland's Chinatown) is superb - probably better than any place in DC. Their dim sum is superb.

If you will be in town before 3 pm on Friday, i'd recommend you get a corned beef sandwich or reuben at Slymans on St. Clair (I think 19th is the Cross Street). Its cash only, only open till 3 and easily the best Corned Beef anywhere and i've eaten a lot of corned beef. Sandwiches are huge. Also, get an order of fries. Superb.

If you're looking for a relaxed dinner, that is very reasonable, there are a few options. The chefs of Cleveland's best restaurants often have diners they run as well, offering superb high quality food at cheap prices. Two i'd recommend:

Mom's Diner (owned by brad Friedlander of Moxie) which is on Miles and Brainard Road in Chagrin Falls
or
Park City Diner (owned by Lockkeepers) which is on Rockside Road

Both diners are convenient to the highways. Both have superb food - burgers, salads, etc. Kind of like an upscale TGi Fridays for lack of a better description.

Where you staying in Cleveland. I can give you a ton more suggestions.

My wife and I are going there this weekend, and we're pretty unfamiliary with the town. We'd appreciate recommendations for:

1) Road food along the way (traveling from D.C. - I70 to I76 to I80).

2) Any "must eats" while there, preferably of the "non-haute" variety. We'll be there for a big family get-together, so culinary/gastronomic diversions will have to be kept to the quick and cheap variety. I'd be particularly interested in any stereotypical food for the Cleveland area, as off the top of my head, I cannot think of anything.

Thanks for the help!



#8 DonRocks

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 03:51 PM

A visit to Cleveland would be incomplete without stopping by Lolita, home of the closed but soon to be reopened Lola, written about in Michael Ruhlman's A Soul of A Chef. Lolita is a self-described casual, Mediterranean-style bistro. There's a whole thread on eGullet about it.

Chef Michael Symon (of Lola and Lolita) was named one of Food & Wine's Best New Chefs in 1998. He has recently opened a restaurant called Parea in New York City as well.

Just to clarify Liam's post, Lola was a casual little neighborhood bistro on the other side of the Cuyahoga River. It has been renamed Lolita, and Michael Symon is going to reopen Lola - presumably a bigger, fancier Lola - somewhere downtown later this year, while keeping Lolita open as his "second restaurant." I had dinner at Lolita several weeks ago and loved it.

Cheers,
Rocks.

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#9 ladle

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 06:18 PM

I have family in Cleveland but had never heard of Lola before - I'll have to get to it on a future trip! There's a great place called Firein a cute area called Shaker Square. I've also eaten at a place called Boulevard Bluewhich had good food, atmosphere, and drinks. If you want a great milkshake, check out a place called Tommy's in the neighboring suburb of Cleveland Heights. These recommendations would require leaving the downtown area but are worth it in my opinion!

#10 youngfood

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Posted 23 September 2006 - 02:19 PM

The aforementioned Lolita (previously known as Lola) is great and the big spot in Cleveland. Blue Point is the spot for seafood and probably my favorite spot in town. If you venture to the east side Fire is fun and Moxie is another good option, though you are really getting into the east side suburbs then.

One additional spot to try downtown for creative Italian is Vivo. The chef is one of the best in Cleveland and does a great, creative job with fish. Its just off Public Square and attached to the Old Arcade.

Cleveland's Little Italy is an underrated option as well. One outstanding, tiny spot is Valerio's. Baricelli Inn was once considered the top restaurant in Ohio and is a nice experience if you have a large budget. If you do Little Italy, be sure to grab donuts to take home afterwards from the Bakery formerly known as Presti's, but now called Gilly's, on the East end of Mayfield. Their sour cream donuts are the only ones I eat anywhere. Get a dozen. You'll eat two that night for dessert no matter how much you had for dinner.

Best French is right on Public Square at Sans Souci.

Wine Spectator did a piece on Cleveland Restaurants recently. Parallax has gotten some raves, though I've also heard mixed things.

#11 chickenlover

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 04:19 PM

I haven't been to Cleveland in a long time, but Max's Deli in Rocky Road is really good--although it is kind of a deli for yuppies. For an authentic Jewish deli, Corky and Lenny's on the east side is the real deal. Great Lakes Brewing Company, near the market, is the best microbrew I've ever tasted and I lived in Oregon (beervana) for 7 years.
Yeah, well, that's just, like, your opinion, man.

#12 Joe G.

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 06:03 PM

I haven't been to Cleveland in a long time, but Max's Deli in Rocky Road is really good


Just for the record, that's Rocky River, not Rocky Road.

Max's Deli
19337 Detroit Rd.
Rocky River, Ohio
440-356-2226

Re: Michael Symon, Lolita, and Lola, folks may be interested in this podcast interview with him from Hungry Magazine

#13 DaveBVI

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 02:58 AM

I haven't been to Cleveland in a long time, but Max's Deli in Rocky River is really good--although it is kind of a deli for yuppies. For an authentic Jewish deli, Corky and Lenny's on the east side is the real deal. Great Lakes Brewing Company, near the market, is the best microbrew I've ever tasted and I lived in Oregon (beervana) for 7 years.

Just to claify, Great Lakes Brewing CO. is across the street and 1/2 a block from the West Side Market, so they get some of their meats (especiall sausages) from there or the same suppliers. They are usually pouring about 4-5 beers, usually 1 or 2 seasonal, which are made on site. Holding tank to tap, no kegs. They are both over the bridge from The Indians Stadium "The jake", thus centrally located. Yummy and not expensive...cleveland prices...Can get loud and busy, but, damn, I miss the beer.
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#14 youngfood

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 07:09 AM

cleveland prices...

Cleveland prices can be really something else. I laughed when someone recently mentioned getting only TWO scallops on an entree order at Oya having been served SIX of them when I was in Cleveland last month at Lolita (one of the best restaurants in town) for $21.

#15 youngfood

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 03:01 PM

Mario Battali says Corbo's Bakery in Cleveland's Little Italy has the best cassata cake in the US.

#16 beezy

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 08:27 PM

Mario Battali says Corbo's Bakery in Cleveland's Little Italy has the best cassata cake in the US.


Oh sweet lord. Corbo's has the best damn everything. We took a little trip to Cleveland over Thanksgiving, and visited there. It has cookies by the pound, all almond paste based, incredibly moist and crispy. Order a pound for yourself!

Michael Symon's Lola is the hot ticket in town now that he's an Iron Chef, and I have to say that what I had lived up to the hype (Lolita was closed when I visited). I had the lunch menu, with a fried baloney sandwich topped with cheddar and cheese and a fried egg. Baloney cut steak style a good 3/8 inch thick. The whole thing was an exercise in wretched excess.

I will say that while Cleveland is cheaper than here, the prices are creeping up in the trendy areas. We still spent $70 for dinner in a fancy neighborhood - not as big a check as here, but I think it's getting more expensive.
Hmph.

#17 youngfood

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 03:33 PM

Has anyone been to the Velvet Tango Room in Cleveland? Michael Ruhlman raves about it here though this article on speakeasys was the first I'd heard of it.

#18 plunk

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 04:10 PM

Has anyone been to the Velvet Tango Room in Cleveland? Michael Ruhlman raves about it here though this article on speakeasys was the first I'd heard of it.

I was there a few weeks ago and loved it. Similar to the PX, but bigger and easier to get a seat. We showed up at 10:30 on a Friday night with six people and it was no problem. If I recall, they had quite an extensive cocktail menu which combined the classics with their own creations. Prices are similar to the PX, as well. I thought they'd be a bit cheaper, but I was wrong.

#19 Sundae in the Park

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 12:22 PM

If you happen to find yourself in Medina, OH, (in the outer suburbs of Cleveland) craving some well-prepared food, I can recommend Thyme Restaurant. It's an interesting space with sleek darker woods and some cozy corners and, in the summertime, an enclosed patio. The menu when we visited seemed very heavy, full of creamy, hearty items, and I'm not sure whether that is what the chef wants to serve or what he thinks he ought to be serving in this area and season, but I can say that most of the dishes we ordered were good-excellent and all left us very, very full. The highlights were the hanger steak and scallops. I didn't get a bite of the steak, which was jealously guarded, but it looked perfectly medium (it was served sliced) and very juicy and was gone in a flash. The scallops were probably the best I've had all year, so perfectly were they seared (delicate crunch on top, quivering on the inside, clean and sweet). The accompanying risotto was very creamy but just fine, as was a (huge) dish of gnocchi dressed with porcinis and spinach. The salads (Caesar and beets) were crisp and pretty, and the French Onion soup came with a gluttonous cap of cheese. The one dessert we ordered reminded us of fair food - deep-frying doesn't really enhance lemon pound cake, but the lemon curd and blueberry sauce were nice toppings. The service was excellent, extremely friendly and attentive without being intrusive.

I don't think I can say this without sounding like a total coastal snob, but it was so much better than I expected! The menu is varied and interesting and I look forward to exploring it further when "home" (spouse's) for the holidays.

#20 JuneBacon

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 10:33 AM

Heading up this weekend to Lola and The Flying Fig for brunch and an Indians/Twins game on Sunday. We are big Michael Symon fans, so sure to be a good time.

#21 JuneBacon

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:00 AM

Good job Don! That must have been difficult !

#22 DonRocks

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:03 AM

Good job Don! That must have been difficult !

[Not difficult; just needed to be done.]

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#23 JuneBacon

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:21 AM

I know, just kidding. Let's see what other old threads I can dig up .... :mellow:

#24 Lori Gardner

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 11:30 PM

I would recommend B Spot for burgers over Lola. I was at Lola several months ago and didn't think it was all that great. on the other hand, loved B Spot.

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#25 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:00 PM

It's been a while since I had a good meal out. Sadly I have to drive all the way to Ohio to eat out. So Michael Symon's restaurants come to mind. If I had one lunch in Cleveland, should I go to Lola (which has a fairly small menu) or somewhere else?

#26 Lori Gardner

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 11:30 PM

I'm heading to Cleveland next week and hoping to try NoodleCat from Chef Jonathon Sawyer who also owns Greenhouse Tavern. Haven't been to either but menus look good. Sawyer worked for Michael Symon and competed on Iron Chef America (lost to Geoffrey Zakarian. If timing doesn't allow a trip to NoodleCat, I'm heading to B Spot, which is my Cleveland fall back.

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#27 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 08:15 PM

I'm heading to Cleveland next week and hoping to try NoodleCat from Chef Jonathon Sawyer who also owns Greenhouse Tavern. Haven't been to either but menus look good. Sawyer worked for Michael Symon and competed on Iron Chef America (lost to Geoffrey Zakarian. If timing doesn't allow a trip to NoodleCat, I'm heading to B Spot, which is my Cleveland fall back.

You are unconventional. I never would've thought to eat Japanese in Cleveland but I can see that NoodleCat is quite tempting with their offerings. This trip, I really want to try a Symon joint and I want something more than sandwiches. Perhaps you can tell me whether the following is worth trying: beef cheek pierogi, wild steel head trout, pork schnitzel, braised short ribs, and muffalettta. Now that I typed them out, I don't think they're really all that exciting sounding. I wished Lolita serves lunch - crispy chicken livers, roasted bone marrow, etc. sounds so much more interesting. I'll check out Greenhouse Tavern too. Thanks.

#28 DonRocks

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 09:11 PM

Thanks.


The most beautiful word you've ever typed here.

You're a good egg, Eric.

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#29 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 09:22 PM

You are unconventional

I meant that as compliment, as in you think outside the box when it comes to dining out in Ohio.

#30 Lori Gardner

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:16 PM

I took your unconventional as a compliment. I appreciate it!
I've only been to Lola once. I am a fan of the pork chop. Here's a link to my review: http://beenthereeate...-in-cleveland/. When at a Michael Symon restaurant, I say go for the pork. Greenhouse Tavern is only open for dinner so I'm off to NoodleCat or B Spot. I'll let you know where I end up and hope you'll do the same.

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#31 thetrain

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:50 AM

You are unconventional. I never would've thought to eat Japanese in Cleveland but I can see that NoodleCat is quite tempting with their offerings. This trip, I really want to try a Symon joint and I want something more than sandwiches. Perhaps you can tell me whether the following is worth trying: beef cheek pierogi, wild steel head trout, pork schnitzel, braised short ribs, and muffalettta. Now that I typed them out, I don't think they're really all that exciting sounding. I wished Lolita serves lunch - crispy chicken livers, roasted bone marrow, etc. sounds so much more interesting. I'll check out Greenhouse Tavern too. Thanks.


I had the beef cheek pierogi for lunch a few years ago - from what I remember I enjoyed it, although it was heavy.

I've also heard good things about this place.

http://www.albatrosbrasserie.com/

#32 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:36 AM

Greenhouse Tavern is only open for dinner

Not according to their website. Now open for weekday lunch. I just realized they're all next to each other.

I think I'm going to Lolita for dinner tonight and do Noodlecat for lunch tomorrow. Ramen must be Be all the rage because another restaurant that looked interesting, Dante, does late night ramen.

#33 Lori Gardner

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 06:15 AM

now have to reconsider my lunch plans. Maybe to Greenhouse Tavern. I only have a small window of time so we'll see. Enjoy Cleveland and I'll check back here to see how it turned out!

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#34 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 05:15 PM

So I was in Green, OH for 4 nights last weekend visiting my MIL. I could've played golf but my allergies were making me miserable so I ended up taking two hour long trips to Cleveland. On Thursday night, I went to Lolita, in the Tremont neighborhood. This "chic" neighborhood was actually kind of sketchy and Lolita itself wasn't so chic. Anyway, I wasn't there for the ambiance. I was there to try Iron Chef Michael Symon's Mediterranean cuisine.

I started with pigs tail and ear. The tail pieces had a crispy outer surface, and then you get to the slightly chewy layer of fat and meat underneath. The sauce reminds me of sweet and sour - nevertheless, I liked the taste and familiar texture. Next it was roasted bone marrow. I've had quite a bit of roasted bone marrow and the novelty has worn off. You definitely need more herbs to cut the richness of the fat. This may be the last time I ever order roasted bone marrow. The last app was crispy chicken livers, served with polenta, mushrooms and chicken. As far as I can tell, these were "country fried" - with just a coating of flour. Given that I'm a big fan of country fried steak and chicken, I did like these livers. My entree was linguini with clams, guanciale, tomato, and bread crumbs - I can see the clams but I couldn't taste them - overwhelmed by the flavor of guanciale. I also had a side of fried Brussels sprouts with anchovies and capers - once too underrated and now too overrated. They were suitably crispy but as David Chang once said "basically, you can't fuck them up. Cook the shit out of them; just don't turn them to charcoal. The bad - everything was over-salted and I had a hard time truly enjoying any dish. I probably should've said something after the first couple of dishes came out.


On Saturday, I went to the West Side Market around 9:30. Picked up some spring/egg rolls, curry pastry and some cellophane noodles a the Cambodian joint (Kim Se). Got some empanadas (pork, chicken and chorizo) at the Mexican joint (Orales). Then some cupcakes and mini-cheesecakes for my wife and MIL. We tried these for dinner and the spring/egg rolls are more or less like the Vietnamese version, the curry pastry wasn't very flavorful - mostly bland potato, but the noodles were pretty good - hard to describe the flavor. The empanadas were also pretty good.


For lunch I went to Noodlecat for ramen and steamed buns. I first ordered Pork Miso Ramen w/ roasted Ohio pork, miso, scallions & greens and these were way too salty. When asked how they were, I blurted out that they were way to salty so they were replaced by Takahachi Ramen w/ garlic pork broth, roasted pork, dashi, sesame seeds, nori, crispy garlic & scallions. These were still very salty but at least edible. The sesame seeds, garlic and scallion made the soup taste like a liquid everything bagel. The noodles, though, didn't taste like ramen. They were more like firm soba (lacking the chewiness of ramen). I also had Japanese Fried Chicken and Tempura Walleye steamed buns. As you can see, the piece of fish was tiny compared to the chicken (probably because all buns are priced at $4). Nothing remarkable about either bun - probably should've tried something less healthy.

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  • walleye and chicken bun.jpg
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#35 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 05:16 PM

Here's the Takahachi ramen.

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#36 darkstar965

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 12:39 AM

In Cleveland recently, I was taken to a place called Harry's Steak House on Brecksville Rd. To lessen the risk of anyone falling victim to what I experienced, I encourage anyone and everyone to avoid it. Our first sign of trouble was when we learned the walleye special (a local and usually delicious fish) was procured frozen. The large promotional signs on the front of the building hawking $13 NY Strip were another bad sign. A steak came out partly rare and partly well done with an off smell and odd taste. I don't want to pile on too much. Just wanted to issue a well-intentioned warning. This was probably the worst meal I've had in several years anywhere.

#37 Xochitl10

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 10:19 AM

Fortunately, Harry Buffalo (2120 E. 4th Street, Cleveland) has more to recommend it than Harry's Steak House does.  I had a delicious brisket quesadilla on a whole-wheat tortilla and Great Lakes Dortmunder, and my friend had boneless wings (?) and fries, all for a very reasonable $24.  The brisket was thinly sliced and deliciously beefy.  I would've liked more heat in the accompanying salsa.

 

We also made a stop at Colossal Cupcakes (530 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland), which is not lying.  $3.75 for an easily shareable gigundo cupcake.  My friend had a carrot cake with cream cheese icing, and I had a chocolate with vanilla buttercream.  Really delicious -- moist, dark chocolate cake and buttery vanilla icing (more dense than fluffy) that had a flavor reminiscent of French vanilla ice cream.  I would easily put this ahead of Hello Cupcake's chocolate cupcake and any of the offerings I've had from Red Velvet (which are tasty, but not as good as some others), but behind everything except the strawberry from Georgetown Cupcake.


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#38 stevep

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 06:09 PM

My wife and I visited Cleveland for 3 nights this past week, primarily to see the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and the Cleveland Zoo.  Both were impressive and made the trip worthwhile.  We stayed at the Hyatt Regency at The Arcade.  The Arcade was built in 1890 as one of the first indoor shopping and office "malls".  It, and the hotel, span the block between Euclid and Superior.  It is a spectacular 4 story structure with a Victorian glass roof, lots of fancy ironwork, and open from floor to glass roof for a block distance.  The rooms are in what were formerly offices.

 

On Monday we ate lunch at Tommy's in Cleveland Heights, a very old timey place that would have felt at home around Dupont Circle or Washington Square in the 60's with a very vegetarian/vegan/gluten free friendly menu.  I had brown rice with veggies surrounded by a large portion of nicely steamed broccoli.  My wife had a rice/bean/vegetable burger.  Both were very tasty and were served by very pleasant staff.  Recommended as a reminder of the old days.

 

Monday night we ate dinner at the Greenhouse Tavern on E. 4th just across Euclid from the Hotel, and around the corner from the House of Blues. E. 4th St. is a 1 block long cobblestoned street closed to traffic with bars and restaurants on both sides of the street.  Greenhouse Tavern is highly recommended with good drinks at reasonable prices ($10 for an aged 60 days Manhattan), a nice selection of dishes and fantastic service.  Jody was our waiter and did a fantastic job in making us feel welcome.  They even had cans of Black Label (Hey Mable....) and Blatz for $2.00.  One of the menu items is "coffee for the kitchen -- $10".  Great fun--Jody brought us a tray with 5 cans of Black Label and 2 bells.  He then accompanied us to the kitchen while we rang the bells and the kitchen staff cheered us on.  We thanked them, they thanked us --  everyone was happy.

 

On Tuesday night we went to Lola, just a few doors down from Greenhouse Tavern, and owned by Michael Symon.  It was crowded and noisy.  It was a "wham, bam, thank you M'am" kind of place, with too efficient service, dishes delivered much too quickly, and a server who just wanted to keep things moving along.  My Manhattan cost $14.  and our dinners were not memorable.

 

On Wednesday night we were back at the Greenhouse Tavern for dinner.  Our waiter this time was Kevin, who repeated the great service we received on Monday night.  Once again the food and drink were tasty and very carefully prepared.  We had a fairly good selection of dishes, wine, and drinks between the 2 dinners and everything was very well prepared and tasty, so I think it's hard to eat badly there.

 

Cleveland is an interesting city to visit, particularly if you are familiar with what it used to be, and is clearly in transition from what it used to be.  Everyone in the travel business was truly appreciative of our visit to Cleveland.  It's an easy hour flight from BWI via Southwest.


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#39 bettyjoan

bettyjoan

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 12:06 PM

Heading to Cleveland the last week of April for work - staying at the Doubletree downtown (Lakeside).  Any recommendations?  I will be flying back on my bday, so I think I will want one "occasion" meal, but otherwise will keep things pretty casual and affordable.  Good beer lists are always welcome.


Betty Thurber Rhoades
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