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Sea Urchin Pasta and Razor Clams


Ericandblueboy
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I'm watching No Reservation and they showed Ripert make this pasta in sea urchin sauce. It looks so good. Any place around here that makes something similar?

How about some razor clams? I still haven't found any :P

Sea urchins are things you should eat at a good sushi place first. Citronelle is serving razor clam and oyster chowder this season.

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I'm watching No Reservation and they showed Ripert make this pasta in sea urchin sauce. It looks so good. Any place around here that makes something similar?

How about some razor clams? I still haven't found any :P

You know, I've had both of these in the DC area multiple times, and right now I'm drawing a blank on where.

I think I've had pasta and sea urchin at Palena before; razor clams several places including CityZen and Sushi-Ko. Kaz does interesting things with sea urchin saucing as well, although not with pasta.

Cheers,

Rocks.

ETA: Yes RJ, I think I've had that dish at Komi too and it was awesome - the pasta is spun like a bird's nest, right?

Edited by DonRocks
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Sea urchins are things you should eat at a good sushi place first. Citronelle is serving razor clam and oyster chowder this season.
Johnny at Komi does a kick ass urchin and crab pasta

I love uni. Unfortunately the night we went to Komi, the urchin pasta wasn't part of the tasting menu. Is the razor clam in the chowder? I would love to try the razor clam somewhat unadulteratd first.

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[Forty minutes after posting, Eric gets a response from the Sommelier at Citronelle, the Chef at Vidalia, and the GM of Corduroy. Everytime this website threatens to completely exhaust me, something like this perks some energy back into my sapped molecules.

Now to validate three-days worth of members and start updating the dining guides which have languished for several weeks. :P]

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[Forty minutes after posting, Eric gets a response from the Sommelier at Citronelle, the Chef at Vidalia, and the GM of Corduroy. Everytime this website threatens to completely exhaust me, something like this perks some energy back into my sapped molecules.

Yeah we should all be so lucky... A couple of years ago I had a great sea Urchin pasta at Tosca.

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I would advocate following Mark's advice regarding Sea Urchin (Uni)... try it at a sushi place first. It's cheaper trying just a piece or two than an entire dish, plus you are trying it unadulterated. Personally I had it once and it was... an acquired taste. That I hadn't acquired. I think it was just that it was so much different than anything else I've had a sushi restaurant that I wasn't prepared for it at all.

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Still haven't been able to try Komi's sea urchin pasta, but I've had a couple in this city (Corduroy and D'Acqua), at Esca and Marea in NYC, and I'm looking forward to trying Bar La Grassa's PASTA NEGRA with SEA URCHIN CHILI, MUSSELS and TOMATO in Minneapolis. Any recent spotting of this dish in the DC area?

I've also had a bunch of razor clams, the best probably being the crudo at Esca or was it Marea in NYC.

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For what it's worth, I've made Spaghetti ai Ricci di Mare a couple of times using the uni at Super H Mart. It's not the world's freshest uni but still makes an amazing dish - especially considering it comes together in under 30 minutes and costs under $15 to make.

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For what it's worth, I've made Spaghetti ai Ricci di Mare a couple of times using the uni at Super H Mart. It's not the world's freshest uni but still makes an amazing dish - especially considering it comes together in under 30 minutes and costs under $15 to make.

Do you have a tested recipe?

I found the following Ripert recipe:

The Sea Urchin Sauce

1/2 cup sea urchin roe

8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened

1 tablespoon water really?

Fine sea salt

Espelette pepper powder

The Pasta

2 ounces dried linguine

To Finish

1-1/2 teaspoons thinly sliced chives

1 tablespoon freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Fine sea salt and freshly ground white pepper

1/2 lemon

The Garnish

1 ounce Iranian osetra caviar

For the sea urchin sauce, puree the sea urchin roe in a blender. Pass it through a fine-mesh sieve, and return to the blender. Blend the puree with the softened butter.

To finish the sauce, bring the water to a boil in a small saucepan. Gradually whisk in the sea urchin butter, about 1 tablespoon at a time. Season with salt and Espelette pepper and keep warm.

When ready to serve, cook the pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente; drain.

Put the chives in a medium stainless steel bowl, add the warmed sauce and Parmesan cheese, and mix well. Season with salt and white pepper if necessary. Gently toss the pasta with the sauce.

To serve, use a meat fork to twirl one-quarter of the pasta and mound it in the center of a small bowl. Repeat three times. Drizzle 1 tablespoon of the sauce remaining in the stainless steel bowl around each mound. Squeeze the lemon juice over the pasta and place 1-1/2 teaspoons of the caviar on top of each mound of pasta. Serve immediately.

Boil 1 tablespoon of water? How does it not evaporate almost immediately?

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The method that I used is roughly what's here in this illustrated blog post: http://porcinichronicles.blogspot.com/2006/09/spaghetti-ai-ricci-di-mare-con-limone.html

I just warm up the olive oil with finely sliced garlic and add that, along with the sea urchin roe to the cooked pasta. I add about a tbsp of pasta water to help distribute the flavour and get the sauce to be the right consistency. Personally, I like to stir it enough so that about half the roe breaks down into a sauce. I know that's not preferred by some but I like it that way. The only other thing I add is pepper. I decided to pass on the lemon and field balm, but may try it in a future attempt.

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From Fat Guy's comments on Didier Elena's return to Adour (NY):

"I don't think there is a better use of sea urchin anywhere I've tried it than Elena's house-made fettucine with fennel, garlic and creamy uni sauce. But it's not just the deep flavors of the dish that are noteworthy, not just the first-rate products and execution. It's the dish's soulfulness and, in at least a sense, rusticity. Elena's father was a fisherman, so he grew up on and around boats. When his father would bring up urchins, the family would remove the meat and mix it with pasta and butter. The dish as served at Adour is a fine-dining version of that childhood memory, and it feels that way. While it is attractively plated, it is not ornate. While it has a great balance of flavors, is it simple and focused on just a couple of flavors (urchin and butter). It is a triumph in so many ways."

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