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Pixar's Ratatouille


ol_ironstomach
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I propose a $20 Friday for June 29. Although... movie tickets, popcorn, candy and soda might hit the $22.50 mark.

A search for promotional tie-ins yielded this and this. Not bad... not bad at all... I truly expected Ronald MacDonald or the Burger King to make an appearance.

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I was surprised to see a food/cooking movie trailer in the theater this afternoon. From....Pixar! It looked so cute that I might see it in the theater.

Ratatouille trailer: http://disney.go.com/disneypictures/ratatouille/

For the record, I can say that Pirates of the Caribbean At World's End contains about 3 peanuts, rum and tea.

Moved from the favorite food movie thread.

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It's fan-freaking-tastic. I caught a sneak preview last weekend in Miami. Check out the way Remy gets his rat buddies to clean up at the end of the film--probably my favorite little gag in the film. Highly recommended. And it will make you want to eat a plate of ratatouille!

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I had modest expectations for this film, which still represents an upgrade from when it was in original director Jan Pinkava's (Geri's Game) hands and I thought Pixar's home-run streak was about to grind to a hard stop.

Ratatouille blew my expectations away. The plot isn't all that great, to be honest, and none of the main characters are drawn with much genuine sympathy except for Rémy the rat, which makes it even more remarkable that director Brad Bird (The Iron Giant, The Incredibles) has made nearly two hours of nonstop compelling storytelling out of it. He didn't just rescue the project; he turned it into an animation tour-de-force. The expressiveness of the rats, the stunning cinematography, the lifelike realism of dozens of select animation elements, and great sound design...this is a film whose technical filmmaking brilliance exceeds that of anything I've seen in years. Bird's gift for heartstopping chase scenes is especially delightful. Computer animation geeks often talk about the eye-candy factor, but this movie really delivers - I haven't felt so amazed by animated water since I watched the Sorcerer's Apprentice segment of Fantasia frame-by-frame.

The accompanying Pixar short film is an absolutely side-splitting work called Lifted that is reminiscent of the best slapstick humor of the Warner Brothers cartoons of the '50s.

No, you won't be humming the movie's tunes or quoting its lines weeks or even days from now. But you won't regret having invested a couple of hours (and the usurious ticket price) letting yourself be amazed.

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I saw this movie with my husband last night (there's not much good food here in Gainesville, FL but they DO have movie theaters!! ;-) ) and I thought of the DR.com gang right away! (It really made me miss you guys….. )

I REALLY liked the monologue at the end about the power and significance of reviews. And how many of us like criticizing things and people as a way to make ourselves seem better and more important than we are.

Even if you are not a animated movie fan and even if you (like me) are totally grossed out by the sight of a bunch of rats scurrying (ICK!!!), please try to make it through the movie if for just the last 20 minutes or so. The final “review” of the restaurant that the critic gives is totally worth it. You will see many of the people we know and know os represented in his “critique”.

Peace & Many Blessings,

LaShanta

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I laughed a lot and cried too. The animation is unbelievable as those more credible than I have already mentioned. The attention to detail in the kitchen is remarkable. I will buy this when it is available but it must, MUST MUST be seen in a theater. Even if you have not set foot in a theater in 10 years, you must for this movie if you want any DR cred with me ;)

Do not get the wasabi peas if they are available at your theater. I don't know what idiot thought they would be an appropriate movie snack. Way too noisy.

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It was a wonderful way to spend two cool hours on a hot summer day.

Rémy: What is that?

Emile: I don't really know.

Rémy: You dunno... and you're eating it?

Emile: You know, once you muscle your way past the gag reflex, all kinds of possibilities open up.

Rémy: This is what I'm talking about.

th-per8n_90_jpg.jpg

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Umm, yeah-you know the seen where Remy tries to get his brother to discover the joys of really tasting the hunk of cheese? Remy waxes poetic in such a way that I thought Rocks himself was describing the cheese. And then remember just when you think the brother is finally going to understand he inhales the rest, making it clear that he could care less?

The exact same scene played out at dinner last night over a burretta and basil salad. Sigh :P;)

I haven't enjoyed two hours in front of a movie screen this much in a long, long time.

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I wish that real rats were as cute as Remy!
Beth and I saw this last night and loved it. I will admit it took me about 15-20 minutes to get over the reflex rat reaction. Until the characters started to develop seeing the sea of rats running around still gave me a full helping of the heebies. Also we both agreed it was a great decision to not have Remy actually speak with Linguini. I know it doesn't all of a sudden make it realistic or anything but I think it would have been considerably cheesier (excuse the word choice) to have the rat talk.
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This was a fun and delightful movie, which I would have enjoyed just as much even if I hadn't been with my six-year-old son. Even more than other Pixar films, this movie can be enjoyed by adults for its references to the egomaniacal food world, the pleasures and pratfalls of the table, and its loving rendition of Paris.

What most impressed me was the artful rendering of the textures of the professional kitchen: tarnished and scratched copper pots, water-stained steel countertops, worn tile floors--every detail of the setting was finely etched and true to life, even more than the characters themselves, where little attempt was made at physical realism.

The food critic, Ego, voiced by a brilliant Peter O'Toole, experiences an epiphany in the movie that had me laughing in tears. Anyone who has been transported by food will immediately identify with the scene. The transformation of this character through the power of cuisine is one of the great strengths and delightful plot twists of the film.

The French Laundry and Taillevent acted as technical advisers; some of the animators even cooked alongside the chefs in their kitchens. Now those are some preproduction meetings I would have loved to attend!

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It finally came out in Paris (well, not really ... it opens tomorrow, but there was a sneak preview tonight)! I saw it with some LCB classmates, and we laughed our way through it! The writers/illustrators did great research, as it captured Paris, French chefs, and kitchens here so well! I never see movies more than once, but am pretty sure I'll make it to this one again at some point.

I made it a point to avoid this thread for the past month so I could see the movie without any expectations or advance knowledge, and I'm so glad I did ... and I was equally glad to get home tonight and check out what you all thought. As hillvalley wrote, I definitely thought of Don and some others from the board during a few scenes :angry:

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