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Can You Freeze... X?


DanCole42
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There are some things that freeze well (like bacon) and some things that don't (like bananas, unless you're making bread or ice cream). This thread is for questions about what foods do and do not freeze well. I'll start.

I recently confited a pork loin. After letting it develop awesomeness in the fridge for a few weeks, I roasted it. It was delicious. The next day, I sliced some more of the roast off and put them on a sandwich. Also delicious.

However, I still have a massive hunk of pork loin (enough for three or four more dinners, of six or eight more sandwiches). Will this freeze well, despite already being cooked? If so, should I leave it whole, or slice it into cold cuts?

Thanks!

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There are some things that freeze well (like bacon) and some things that don't (like bananas, unless you're making bread or ice cream). This thread is for questions about what foods do and do not freeze well. I'll start.

I recently confited a pork loin. After letting it develop awesomeness in the fridge for a few weeks, I roasted it. It was delicious. The next day, I sliced some more of the roast off and put them on a sandwich. Also delicious.

However, I still have a massive hunk of pork loin (enough for three or four more dinners, of six or eight more sandwiches). Will this freeze well, despite already being cooked? If so, should I leave it whole, or slice it into cold cuts?

Thanks!

Duck confit freezes perfectly well and with this you have no skin to worry about. Freezing it whole is probably the best for the product, but that will require you eat the whole thing when you finally defrost it. If you have a vacuum sealer portion out as appropriate, seal, and freeze.

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Duck confit freezes perfectly well and with this you have no skin to worry about. Freezing it whole is probably the best for the product, but that will require you eat the whole thing when you finally defrost it. If you have a vacuum sealer portion out as appropriate, seal, and freeze.

Even after the confit is has been cooked a second time?

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I keep a lot of things in the freezer to keep them from going rancid, double bagged in ziplocks. Grits, polenta, corn meal, brown rice, pecans, pine nuts, almond flour, grated lemon peel, essential oils, are some examples.

I keep jars of bread yeast in the freezer. Lasts forever.

Ripe bananas, as you said, in individual sandwich bags, frozen for smoothies. Any kind of berry, freeze them on a tray and then bag them.

We don't have a vacuum sealing device but fish that is individually frozen in one lasts very well. Not so well otherwise.

Soups, chili, and especially stews. Fill the container to the brim.

A Louisiana trick, freeze fresh shrimp in an ice block, like a sawed off milk carton. This works very well. Better if you use nice fresh heads on shrimp, right off the boat. The combination of shrimp peel and frozen ice is protective of the texture and the flavor. If you ever freeze the ones without the heads, the little exposed "shoulder" will not be as good as the rest of the shrimp.

Frozen things should be in jars, bottles, or double bags. Or, if you will, the vacuum sealer. Keep freezer air from circulating on the food, or you will get freezer burn. The food may still be good but freezer ice doesn't taste nice.

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I tried it once and the ice crystals made it into something sponge-like and unappetizing. That was with firm tofu.

Actually, freezing tofu, wrapped in plastic and then thawing it is a hippie-dippy method of making something sponge-like and unappetizing first, then after squeezing out all the excess moisture, and incorporating lots of other stuff and subjecting it to heat, ending up with about the only pretend-meat substance I really, really like.

I swear I am not as into Moosewood as recent recommendations might suggest, but the restaurant's second cookbook has a baked hamburger made out of this stuff that is better than not bad, that was initially transformed into a blue plate special (pseudo-meatloaf) that ultimately led to the beauty that is their Shepherd's Pie. Because some of my family's traditions are rather odd, I always add a layer of corn (frozen niblets, cooked) in between tofu mixture and mushroom gravy. Brussels sprouts and steamed carrots on side.

Time-consuming, but as an omnivore, I tend to make this just about every winter, though plans are to try an Argentine version instead this year.

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I can freeze coconut milk, right? I never use a whole can at one time...

I've known people who do that in ice cube trays, so it's possible. I think if you try and thaw it out, it won't be as emulsified anymore and if boiled might "curdle" (though that last one is just something I read somewhere), but if you're adding it to a curry or something, probably be fine.

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I can freeze coconut milk, right? I never use a whole can at one time...

I think so as well. However, I've found it very handy to have packets of dehydrated coconut milk on hand where I can just mix up what I need and the rest hangs out on the shelf in a baggie until next time. You can find this at the various asian groceries around town. Haven't seen it show up yet at mainstream groceries around here.

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Jalapenos freeze well for use in cooking in the future. Like any other pepper, the texture will be mushy when they thaw, so using them raw won't work. Just wash & dry them and throw them whole into freezer bags and toss in the freezer.

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Egg yolks, I believe you have to beat them with some water, freeze in ice cube trays, and then pop out and coat with a thin sheen of oil for storing. And they don't have a long freezer life, maybe a couple of months at best. I just save leftover yolks for a couple of days in the fridge, either add to an omelet, make a mayo, or make spaghetti carbonara. I usually forget about them in the freezer until its too late.

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