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Rules to Eat By


KMango
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As I sit here savoring my cherry tootsie roll pop, I got as far as, "avoid snack foods with the 'oh' sound in its name-- ho-ho's, doritos, etc." I get a gold star as I have none of these foods in my house (at the moment).

Thanks for posting the link, KMango. Interesting read.

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If it's brown, drink it down. If it's black, send it back.

A habanero in the hand hurts less than two in the tush.

Arterial plaque makes an excellent buttery spread for toasts and crumpets.

As apex predators, eating other animals is not just okay, it's a biological imperative.

When I say Hillshire, you say Farms. Hillshire! Farms! GO MEAT!!

A good cook cleans as he goes.

When cooking, use all nine senses. Especially smell and tarbulencery.

And finally:

Create like a god

Command like a king

Work like a slave

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Rules To Eat By.

Alas, no mention of Catholic School Girls. Chili Pepper lyrics must not count or something.

The food business is similar to the wine business, healthcare business or any of the other service industries that dominate the marketplace in the US. Their lobbying efforts are as pervasive and nefarious as the current healtcare debate has become. Many major newspapers, including the Washington Post re-cycle and re-write press releases from the dominant food providers. A trip to the Safeway is an easy way to find the products from ConAgra, My liGeneral Mills, Neslte, Cargill and more. All these companies have full time lobbyists and aggressive PR firms. Look particularly at the products ConAgra sells. They are all competing brands. They fill practically 80% of the shelves of Giants and Safeways. It shouldn't be a surprise what the result of all this processed food is. The "rules" were cute, but ultimately, not helpful. It is a shame that the alternative, farmers markets and independent food markets are the more expensive alternative.

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A trip to the Safeway is an easy way to find the products from ConAgra, My liGeneral Mills, Neslte, Cargill and more. All these companies have full time lobbyists and aggressive PR firms. Look particularly at the products ConAgra sells. They are all competing brands. They fill practically 80% of the shelves of Giants and Safeways. It shouldn't be a surprise what the result of all this processed food is. The "rules" were cute, but ultimately, not helpful. It is a shame that the alternative, farmers markets and independent food markets are the more expensive alternative.

Sadly, this is all too true of a trip to the local Whole Foods. Today I was at the Silver Spring store and the most local organic item I could spot was Florida priduce at a time when these items could have been sourced here locally. The cheese department was full of industrail grade cheeses. The grocery shelves were full of overly processed and overly sweetened foods of dubious nutritional value. While one can go there and make a healthy and responsible shopping trip, it is far easier to fall into the clutches of big organic at WFM which is so little difference than being int he clutches of big ag.
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It is a shame that the alternative, farmers markets and independent food markets are the more expensive alternative.

It's funny. When I buy produce from the farmers' market, I always feel like I'm spending LESS than I do at the supermarket. Maybe it's because I'm giving more thought to what I'm buying rather than yanking it off shelves, or maybe because I'm JUST buying farm fresh rather than superfluous items like bacon chocolate bras. (I could change that to bars, but leaving the typo is funnier)

Part of where the wallet seems to get hit the most when shopping locally is meats, which almost always seem cheaper at the local megamart. George Schenk, the founder of American Flatbread, told me that part of the problem here (and one of the barriers to widespread locavorism) is that we have this idea of dinner being a massive protein with a veggie side. Protein will always be more expensive. But if we reversed our thinking, if we didn't think of protein as being the centerpiece but rather almost a garnish, (think large flat bread with cheese and veggies and only a sprinkling of a couple ounces of protein), local organic becomes much more affordable.

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It's funny. When I buy produce from the farmers' market, I always feel like I'm spending LESS than I do at the supermarket. Maybe it's because I'm giving more thought to what I'm buying rather than yanking it off shelves, or maybe because I'm JUST buying farm fresh rather than superfluous items like bacon chocolate bras. (I could change that to bars, but leaving the typo is funnier)

You've seen the bacon bra, right?

Part of where the wallet seems to get hit the most when shopping locally is meats, which almost always seem cheaper at the local megamart. George Schenk, the founder of American Flatbread, told me that part of the problem here (and one of the barriers to widespread locavorism) is that we have this idea of dinner being a massive protein with a veggie side. Protein will always be more expensive. But if we reversed our thinking, if we didn't think of protein as being the centerpiece but rather almost a garnish, (think large flat bread with cheese and veggies and only a sprinkling of a couple ounces of protein), local organic becomes much more affordable.

Which goes right back to Pollan (ha, full-circle thread): Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. (Since I never met a vegetable I didn't like, I'm ok with that. ) Think of Asian societies, where meat is in fact used as a garnish instead of as the centerpiece of the plate. I think the focus on protein arose in societies where farming the land became difficult with harsh winters and poor soil; wheat and animals that ate grains prospered, and became the norm. (Anyone know if that's a legitimate read of the history?)

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Sadly, this is all too true of a trip to the local Whole Foods. Today I was at the Silver Spring store and the most local organic item I could spot was Florida priduce at a time when these items could have been sourced here locally. The cheese department was full of industrail grade cheeses. The grocery shelves were full of overly processed and overly sweetened foods of dubious nutritional value. While one can go there and make a healthy and responsible shopping trip, it is far easier to fall into the clutches of big organic at WFM which is so little difference than being int he clutches of big ag.

When I was at the Old Town Whole Foods last week, one of the items on my shopping list was pork tenderloin. They used to carry Niman Ranch tenderloin, which is an expensive splurge but good. In the meat cases, however, all I could find on this trip was (non-NR) pork sirloin, which was disappointing but not a huge problem. What WAS a problem is that all of the pieces of sirloin they had were pre-marinated. I don't buy packaged pre-marinated pork at the Safeway, and I'm sure as hell not going to buy it at Whole Foods :( . I also asked at the butcher counter, and that was all they had. The woman couldn't even tell me whether they would be stocking plain pork tenderloin again.

This was on top of my futile attempts last month to find Israeli couscous, which they used to stock in their 365 brand. It seems to have been replaced by Near East pearled couscous, which might be tolerable, but it's only available in pre-flavored varieties. It's not possible, at least at the Old Town store, to buy plain pearled couscous anymore.

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What WAS a problem is that all of the pieces of sirloin they had were pre-marinated. I don't buy packaged pre-marinated pork at the Safeway, and I'm sure as hell not going to buy it at Whole Foods :( . I also asked at the butcher counter, and that was all they had.

That is quite strange. That is definitely not the case at the Clarendon Whole Foods, if it is at all convenient to you. Also, if they do not have what I want, they have offered to butcher it if I wanted to come back later to pick it up.

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That is quite strange. That is definitely not the case at the Clarendon Whole Foods, if it is at all convenient to you. Also, if they do not have what I want, they have offered to butcher it if I wanted to come back later to pick it up.

I used to find the butcher counter at Clarendon to be superior to that at other Whole Foods, but then it seemed to slip some. I get to that location periodically, so I'll aim for there next time I want pork tenderloin. Thanks.

They may well have it at the Old Town store again. I find that the employees there frequently have no idea if things are discontinued or just out for the time being. Service at the Clarendon store is better overall, but it's generally easier for me to get to Old Town.

(And I bought some of the couscous online, so I'm set for a while, but I'll remember to check Harris Teeter and Trader Joe's when I run low.)

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That is quite strange. That is definitely not the case at the Clarendon Whole Foods, if it is at all convenient to you. Also, if they do not have what I want, they have offered to butcher it if I wanted to come back later to pick it up.

Whole foods buys its meats in bag. They may have a pork loin to cut a tenderloin off from. The tenderloin is bought in bags of 2 and should be easy to get. Sometimes they are in the grab & go meat case.

WFM's marinades are made for them of property and I find them to have a processed food taste because that is what they are.

I would report the meat counter issues to the store manager.

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Risotto is a first course, not a main course, nor side dish unless you're eating osso buco and it's risotto Milanese.

Parmesan should be a fine powder when grated onto pasta.

Eat your salad after main course.

Eat your salad before your main course.

It's rude to salt food at the table after someone else seasoned it for you.

Eat your vegetables.

Don't eat animals with cloven feet.

Don't eat after 7 PM.

Don't eat between sunrise and sundown.

Don't drink alcohol.

Don't eat carbs.

Don't eat meat.

Don't eat anything with a face. (For some reason this exempts fish according to its adherents.)

Don't eat trans fats.

Chew at least X times before swallowing.

Don't talk with your mouth full, Billy.

How many rules are about things that bring you pleasure rather than make you feel put upon?

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When I was at the Old Town Whole Foods last week, one of the items on my shopping list was pork tenderloin. They used to carry Niman Ranch tenderloin, which is an expensive splurge but good. In the meat cases, however, all I could find on this trip was (non-NR) pork sirloin, which was disappointing but not a huge problem. What WAS a problem is that all of the pieces of sirloin they had were pre-marinated. I don't buy packaged pre-marinated pork at the Safeway, and I'm sure as hell not going to buy it at Whole Foods :( . I also asked at the butcher counter, and that was all they had. The woman couldn't even tell me whether they would be stocking plain pork tenderloin again.

I hate that. It seems no matter where you go the loin and tenderloin are always pre-marinated. I think this is even the case with the tenderloin at union Meat at Eastern Market. (Harris Teater still carries NR, IIRC.)

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...I think the focus on protein arose in societies where farming the land became difficult with harsh winters and poor soil; wheat and animals that ate grains prospered, and became the norm. (Anyone know if that's a legitimate read of the history?)
Protein consumption as a function of winters and poor soil highlights the versatile pig due to its indiscriminate palate, large litters and easily preserved meat, though parasites and difficulties in porcine herding have led to its prohibition from predominantly shepherding societies (pigs eat all their crops). Winter diets of centuries past relied heavily on preserves, roots and stored grains.

General meat consumption however, and its hefty proportions to produce/grains have been the hallmark of the wealthy gentry who consume(d) in a manner to distance themselves from the philistine’s paltry pantry, often at the expense of dietary health (e.g. gout and the nutritional deficiencies of “white bread”). Modern steakhouses are a shameless homage to those regal fat cat appetites of antiquity.

Domesticated grain crops such as wheat, rice, barley and maize/corn were and remain far more efficient means of providing nourishment than livestock sharing the same land and permitted otherwise nomadic folks to settle down. Those crops made meat an expensive luxury up until the industrial age, which then allowed for cheaper and more widely accessible meat as a result of efficient pasture management, formulated feed, selective breeding, automation and transportation. Meat is only a cheaper commodity in the industrialized world and remains an expensive privilege everywhere else.

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Life is to short to drink bad wine.

and the variant: Life is short. Eat dessert first.

Life is uncertain. Eat dessert first!

I still get flak from people about eating dessert first at banquets. What usually then follows is a growing sense of envy, especially if the servers (or lines, if it's a buffet) are slow. Finally, liberation.

The three stages of dessert. Eat your heart out, Kubler-Ross.

Yes, I count raw oyster bars as dessert.

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(Harris Teater still carries NR, IIRC.)

You are correct. Thanks! I found Niman pork tenderloin at the Capitol Hill Harris Teeter.

This and my other complaint illustrate one principle I try to adhere to: Buy foods in as close to their natural state as possible.

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Don't eat fish/seafood far from an ocean.

Don't eat shellfish during a month without an "R".

Don't talk with your mouth full.

Don't chew with your mouth open.

Don't slurp (for non-Asians only).

Keep your elbows off the table.

If you refuse to eat your healthy food, you can't have dessert.

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