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Has anyone seen Karen MacNeil's (The Wine Bible) television series "Wine, Food and Friends?" Apparently, it was shown on local PBS last winter or so. I see it now through New Jersey Network via satellite. The production company is local, so I guess that explains why so much was shot here, at local restaurants, wine shops and with local residents in their homes.

Interesting to see the local spots. Roberto Donna had a major role in an episode along with Rudy Maxa. Not a bad program by any means, but MacNeil's "memory cues" might well be the stupidest thing I've ever heard. "The way to remember this wine? Think of it as..... Nicole Kidman/young Arnold Schwarzenegger/Audrey Hepburn...etc." Bah.

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Has anyone seen Karen MacNeil's (The Wine Bible) television series "Wine, Food and Friends?"  Apparently, it was shown on local PBS last winter or so.  I see it now through New Jersey Network via satellite.  The production company is local, so I guess that explains why so much was shot here, at local restaurants, wine shops and with local residents in their homes.

Interesting to see the local spots.  Roberto Donna had a major role in an episode along with Rudy Maxa.  Not a bad program by any means, but MacNeil's "memory cues" might well be the stupidest thing I've ever heard.  "The way to remember this wine?  Think of it as.....  Nicole Kidman/young Arnold Schwarzenegger/Audrey Hepburn...etc."  Bah.

I believe you can also catch it on PBS at various times as my Tivo records it for me. As for her memory cues, I guess you have not read The Wine Bible. :P

She also did another shoot locally with sommelier Doug Mohr of Vidalia. He showed how to properly open a bottle of champagne.

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I received the following e-mail from Mark Phillips, who runs the Wine Tasting Association here in the DC area. I offer it without comment ... except to say that I, personally, would NEVER drink wine while doing laundry for fear of making a mistake and having my underwear come out looking like rose' ...

My show Enjoying Wine with Mark Phillips is about to air. You would think they could have come up with a sexier name than that? Anyway, it airs nationwide in March on public television. In Washington D.C. it's airing on March 7 at 8pm on WETA, Channel 26.

I am inquiring to see if you would mention the show to your readers by sending an email.

I think it's important to promote this show, even if it wasn't mine, for two reasons:

1. There has been no successful wine show on TV and halping make this one a success will help bring more wine shows to TV which will get more folks involved in wine.

2. It supports PBS.

My show is a 90 minute special about wine that's meant to be fun. I'll be talking about:

Microwaving wine

Freezing wine

What wine to have while walking the dog, doing laundry, etc.

The one ingredient that will make every wine and food match work

Putting ice cubes in wine

and much more

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1. There has been no successful wine show on TV and halping make this one a success will help bring more wine shows to TV which will get more folks involved in wine.

No matter what you think of her, I bet that Andrea Immer would beg to differ.

PS- Although for what it's worth, I think her new cooking show is absolutely horrendous.

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No matter what you think of her, I bet that Andrea Immer would beg to differ.

PS- Although for what it's worth, I think her new cooking show is absolutely horrendous.

I haven't seen one all the way through, but what don't you like about it? The idea of pairing herbs and flavorings to wine sounds intriguing.

And when did she marry Jancis, anyway? :lol:

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I haven't seen one all the way through, but what don't you like about it? The idea of pairing herbs and flavorings to wine sounds intriguing.

And when did she marry Jancis, anyway? :lol:

I tried to watch it twice and I think one time I made it all the way through.

It's rather dumbed down food-wise. Rachel Ray-level recipes. And she has some of RR's habits -- AI says "Yummy" instead of "Yummo".

It's basically watching "30 minute meals" with wine. Not bad, but if I want to watch Rachel Ray, I'll watch Rachel Ray.

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No matter what you think of her, I bet that Andrea Immer would beg to differ.

PS- Although for what it's worth, I think her new cooking show is absolutely horrendous.

Absolutely horrendous cubed. It's THAT bad. I wanted to gouge my eyes out after watching an episode and I have banned my Tivo from ever trying to record it again.

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Have any of you seen Wine, Food, and Friends with Karen MacNeil? How does her wine show compare to AI?

I have seen this show. The word "horrible" comes to mind. I love wine, but don't know too much about it and thought that maybe this show would help. Nope. I don't care for Karen MacNeil's on-air persona or the fact that she dumbs things down and provides "memory cues" about wines. Ugh. Is there no happy medium between telling me that a wine has a particular bouquet (a la the old Steve Martin routines) and telling me to think of rose as a "young Barbara Streisand"? I'm not sure if the wine or Barbara should be more insulted. In one show, she provided the following info:

1. Rosé

Color: Red

Taste: Dry, Robust, Spicy, Berries

Geography: France, Spain, USA & Others

Memory Cue: Young Barbara Streisand

2. Blanc De Blancs

Color: White

Grape: Chardonnay

Taste: Light and Crisp

Memory Cue: Renee Zellweger

3. Blanc De Noirs

Color: Red

Grape: Pinot Noir

Taste: Full and Round

Memory Cue: Catherine Zeta Jones

In case you think I may have made this up, here is a link to that epsiode. wineshow. And I'm happy to see the information about the new wine show. I'll give it a try.

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No matter what you think of her, I bet that Andrea Immer would beg to differ.

PS- Although for what it's worth, I think her new cooking show is absolutely horrendous.

At one point in her career, Ms. Immer was the official sommelier of Target department stores. One of her savory recommendations:

With buttery chardonnay like Kendall-Jackson Vintners Reserve pair Orville Riedenbackers butter flavored gourmet popcorn. (I'm not making this up!)

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3. Blanc De Noirs

Color: Red

Grape: Pinot Noir

Taste: Full and Round

Memory Cue: Catherine Zeta Jones

I followed the link provided and now feel much dumber than before I did so, and I don't have too much more intelligence to lose. Anyway, it appears that according to Karen MacNeil a Blanc de Noirs is a red wine. At least the old guy who wrote the story in today's post does not purport to claim to be a wine expert.
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I have seen this show.  The word "horrible" comes to mind. I love wine, but don't know too much about it and thought that maybe this show would help. Nope. I don't care for Karen MacNeil's on-air persona or the fact that she dumbs things down and provides "memory cues" about wines. Ugh.  Is there no happy medium between telling me that a wine has a particular bouquet (a la the old Steve Martin routines) and telling me to think of rose as a "young Barbara Streisand"?  I'm not sure if the wine or Barbara should be more insulted.  In one show, she provided the following info:

1. Rosé

Color: Red

Taste: Dry, Robust, Spicy, Berries

Geography: France, Spain, USA & Others

Memory Cue: Young Barbara Streisand

2. Blanc De Blancs

Color: White

Grape: Chardonnay

Taste: Light and Crisp

Memory Cue: Renee Zellweger

3. Blanc De Noirs

Color: Red

Grape: Pinot Noir

Taste: Full and Round

Memory Cue: Catherine Zeta Jones

In case you think I may have made this up, here is a link to that epsiode. wineshow.  And I'm happy to see the information about the new wine show. I'll give it a try.

This show was produced locally. Many of the episodes are set in DC Metro area. It visits a number of local restaurants, wine retailers and features the local riff raff citizenry getting lessons from MacNeil.

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At one point in her career, Ms. Immer was the official sommelier of Target department stores. One of her savory recommendations:

With buttery chardonnay like Kendall-Jackson Vintners Reserve pair Orville Riedenbackers butter flavored gourmet popcorn. (I'm not making this up!)

At least once a week I make some popcorn, open a bottle of Champagne and watch an old movie with my wife. All around perfect match.
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This show was produced locally.  Many of the episodes are set in DC Metro area.  It visits a number of local restaurants, wine retailers and features the local riff raff citizenry getting lessons from MacNeil.

I believe only one show was done locally. One was up in NY and a bunch in CA. She runs the wine program out at the CIA campus in CA and her book The Wine Bible is pretty good. Although you do have to deal with the linking of wines to movie stars. :lol:

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Just because this is so bizarre, I have to ask:  Why?

From her web site this is the memory cue for German Riesling...

German Riesling

Color: White

Taste: Crisp, Peaches, Apricots

Geography: Germany

Memory Cue: Lace Negligée

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Just because this is so bizarre, I have to ask:  Why?

Something about it being easygoing. I'll have to look at the magazine tonight - she had a few others.

Or maybe Riesling is jealous of some luscious, full bodied, red wine (i.e. Angelina Jolie)?

Edited by bilrus
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I believe only one show was done locally.  One was up in NY and a bunch in CA.  She runs the wine program out at the CIA campus in CA and her book The Wine Bible is pretty good.  Although you do have to deal with the linking of wines to movie stars.  :lol:

According to her site, there were 4 shows done here. I saw them all. I wouldn't rave over the show and I really didn't like those memory cue things. But it wasn't bad overall. Clearly better than that Andrea Immer garbage.

European Wines

guest was Rudy Maxa. They cooked with Roberto Donna at Galileo

Visited:

Taberna Del Alabardero

Gallileo

La Ferme

An episode on foodie supper clubs shot in Sterling.

They visited MacArthur Beverages

Dating and Wine

Visited:

L’Auberge Chez Francois

Bistro Bis

Building a wine pantry

They shot this one at some couple's home in MD.

Ann Cashion was on it, too, and did a recipe demonstration.

They also visited Pearson’s Wine

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According to her site, there were 4 shows done here.  I saw them all.  I wouldn't rave over the show and I really didn't like those memory cue things.  But it wasn't bad overall.  Clearly better than that Andrea Immer garbage.

European Wines

guest was Rudy Maxa.  They cooked with Roberto Donna at Galileo

Visited:

Taberna Del Alabardero

Gallileo

La Ferme

An episode on foodie supper clubs shot in Sterling.

They visited MacArthur Beverages

Dating and Wine

Visited:

L’Auberge Chez Francois

Bistro Bis

Building a wine pantry

They shot this one at some couple's home in MD.

Ann Cashion was on it, too, and did a recipe demonstration.

They also visited Pearson’s Wine

I guess it is good to see DC getting some exposure. I have only seen a few shows and must have missed all the local ones.

It is not a bad show, especially considering the other wine shows out there.

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Man.

I'll hold off judgement til I see the show.

I have a certain respect for Karen MacNeil; I think the Wine Bible is a great book for teaching people about wine without dumbing it down too much...but the show...and the celebrity-comparison gimmick...kinda sad.

Although, at the same time I think we should have some patience for what we see as "dumbed down." If it helps spark more Americans' interest and fascination with wine, that's a good thing all around- even if it makes us cringe.

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More celeb/wine comparisons from Cooking Light this month:

Chardonnay - soft, blond, round and fleshy - Marilyn Monroe

Sauvignon blanc - taut, lean, sassy - Jamie Lee Curtis

Zinfandel - muscular, full-bodied, thick - Arnold Schwarzenegger

As for the Jennifer Aniston thing, she asked a salesperson at a wine store for a wine like Jennifer Aniston and he gave her a light bodied, easy-going Australian Riesling. Can you imagine his intital reaction to her request? I wonder what the occasion was that prompted the need for an Aniston wine?

And what sort of food do you serve with a Jennifer Aniston?

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French fries and Champagne -- our favorite combination.  Seriously!

Nacho cheese Doritos also go really well with Champagne. We discovered this on a day when we were completely exhausted by moving, the phone wasn't hooked up (this was before either of us had a cellphone), and the only food and drink items in the new house were a bag of Doritos and a bottle of Veuve Clicquot. Now, it's a moving day tradition. :lol:

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Nacho cheese Doritos also go really well with Champagne.  We discovered this on a day when we were completely exhausted by moving, the phone wasn't hooked up (this was before either of us had a cellphone), and the only food and drink items in the new house were a bag of Doritos and a bottle of Veuve Clicquot.  Now, it's a moving day tradition.  :lol:

Champagne is one of the most versatile drinks available. I have yet to find something that I cannot match with some Champagne. I used to swear that chocolate and foie gras were on that list, then tried chocolate and Nectar Imperial Rose, and foie gras with VC demi-sec, both were matches made in heaven.
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I have seen this show.  The word "horrible" comes to mind. I love wine, but don't know too much about it and thought that maybe this show would help. Nope. I don't care for Karen MacNeil's on-air persona or the fact that she dumbs things down and provides "memory cues" about wines. Ugh.  Is there no happy medium between telling me that a wine has a particular bouquet (a la the old Steve Martin routines) and telling me to think of rose as a "young Barbara Streisand"?  I'm not sure if the wine or Barbara should be more insulted.  In one show, she provided the following info:

1. Rosé

Color: Red

Taste: Dry, Robust, Spicy, Berries

Geography: France, Spain, USA & Others

Memory Cue: Young Barbara Streisand

Most of you guys are too young to remember one of Barbra's early hits from the late 60's--a song that Fanny Brice (the inspiration for Funny Girl and Funny Lady) made famous in the 1920's:

"I'm wearing second-hand hats

Second-hand hose

That's why they call me

SECOND-HAND ROSE

Even our piano in the parlor

Father bought for ten cents on the dollar

Secondhand rings, I'm sick of second-hand things

I never get a single thing that's new

Once while strolling through the park

A girl got my goat

She nudged her friend and said

'Oh look, there goes my old fur coat'

Oh everyone knows

That I'm just SECOND-HAND ROSE

From Second Avenue

From Second Avenue"

:lol:

Edited by zoramargolis
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Ok. So, I'm watching this Mark Phillips show. I'm not done with it yet. I'll watch more tomorrow, I think. But there's one thing I wanted to point out that he said.

Let's say there's no salesperson where you're buying wine to help you. Safeway for instance. For wines from North or South America, if the producers name begins with the letter C or A or R, the wine will be good. He stressed that this doesn't mean you can't find good or great wines from producers that begin with other letters, but C A R will be good wine.

Discuss. <_<

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I watched about five minutes of this show last week and found it incredibly dull. It might have offered useful information at some point, maybe even throughout, but the host came across as some sort of wine court jester and didn't hold my interest.

As far as the C-A-R link, I am sure Bart Araujo is pleased his wines compare so favorably to, say, Callaway.

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I just finished watching the rest of the program. It got much better. When you take it that this program is for beginners and advanced beginners, I was quite impressed. Some reasons:

Rather than try to introduce folks to individual taste characteristics of certain bottles, vintages, etc. he split it right into generalizations between the nature and character of old world wine vs. new world wine. A much easier concept for beginners to understand. The details included length of growing season, the role of food in the creation of old world wine, the differences you'd generally find between acidity and fruitiness of old vs. new.

This is what kind of led to the bit about "what kind of wine to have when doing the laundry or walking the dog." In general, he was saying that (for novices now) it's best to order/serve an old world wine if you're having it with food/meal. The higher acid and tamer fruit complements the meal better than a new world wine. If you're doing the laundry, go for the new world wine. Generally it'll be fruitier, less acidic and more like a meal in a glass. (He broke the food thing down further in that if you're having food made by a "chef" order old world wine. If the food is being prepared by a cook (burger, mac and cheese, scrambled eggs) go for the new world wine as the higher fruit won't be fighting the flavor interactions as much as the kind of meal a chef would prepare. I think it's neat advice).

Beyond content, and there's more I could say but I don't have the time right now (write now?), I was also impressed with him as a presenter. Kinda goofy at times, but on the whole I appreciated the fact that he stood out there and gave quality advice on wine and didn't once have to tout any kind of pedigree. You know from his presentation he was well versed in his craft. That's not to say he necessarily knows everything or knows the right things, but there was an engaging level of authority and teaching that didn't become lecture. Unlike the dreadful Andrea Immer who I think has to live on credentials and connections to make a point. (Would love to know if anyone thinks that there might be a difference here because she's a woman.)

Anyway, I'd be happy seeing more of Mark Phillips. The program would be a welcome addition to boosting the wine knowledge of the masses. Although I would like to know more about where that C-A-R comment that I noted in an earlier post comes from. That one was kinda out of left field and unlike other generalizations he made to assist the novice, I think that one was misplaced.

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So I'm new to this whole board stuff. This is my first posting ever. It's me. Mark Phillips. Thanks CrescentFresh for your comments. I was a little worried after your first posting that you said I was boring. But either way, I like to hear feedback about the show...even the negative.

Let me briefly explain the C-A-R system. My whole goal with wine is to give novices...or anyone for that matter...an easy way to enjoy wine. When it comes to buying wine, there has never been a system put out there about how to do it without any help. So I went to wine shops and looked for wines that I thought were reliable choices and came up with a common thread. So any North or South American producer that begins with the letters C, A or R usually makes good wine. Oh sure, Corbett Canyon, etc....there are those but there will always be exceptions. And I'm NOT saying that the producers that DON'T begin with those letters don't make good wine. Or course not. My system is kind of like the Zinfandel R's. Ravenswood, Rosenblum, Renwood, Ridge. Remember the R's for Zinfandel and you'll be in good shape most of the time. Obviously there are very good Zinfandel producers that don't begin with an "R". But the idea is to come up with a system that works more times than not.

And it continues. C, A or R for North or South American wine producers. R or P for Australian producers. And the best one....M for European wine. If the producer, grape variety or region begins with the letter "M", the odds are the buyer will like the wine. I know it sounds whacky but for the novice, it will work.

Okay, that's it for my first post. I'm going to drink some wine.

Mark

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Can I reply to my own post? I don't have a clue how this works. But I realized it wasn't Crescent who thought I was incredibly dull, it was B.A.R....just wanted to make sure I didn't misrepresent Crescent.

I know this is a board of real wine folks and I can imagine that folks like B.A.R. WILL find my show dull. And even worse, wrong. But you folks are not my target audience. I am trying to give novices practical information that they can use to better approach wine.

But I would still love to hear your critical comments. Just don't egg my house.

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I watched about five minutes of this show last week and found it incredibly dull. It might have offered useful information at some point, maybe even throughout, but the host came across as some sort of wine court jester and didn't hold my interest.

Now you have me quoting my own post! Five minutes of a two-hour show is certainly not an objective example. The five minutes I watched were a little bit goofy, but I realize that part of trying to de-mystify wine for the novice is to make it more approachable.

Welcome to the board!

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So I'm new to this whole board stuff. This is my first posting ever. It's me. Mark Phillips. Thanks CrescentFresh for your comments. I was a little worried after your first posting that you said I was boring. But either way, I like to hear feedback about the show...even the negative.

Let me briefly explain the C-A-R system. My whole goal with wine is to give novices...or anyone for that matter...an easy way to enjoy wine. When it comes to buying wine, there has never been a system put out there about how to do it without any help. So I went to wine shops and looked for wines that I thought were reliable choices and came up with a common thread. So any North or South American producer that begins with the letters C, A or R usually makes good wine. Oh sure, Corbett Canyon, etc....there are those but there will always be exceptions. And I'm NOT saying that the producers that DON'T begin with those letters don't make good wine. Or course not. My system is kind of like the Zinfandel R's. Ravenswood, Rosenblum, Renwood, Ridge. Remember the R's for Zinfandel and you'll be in good shape most of the time. Obviously there are very good Zinfandel producers that don't begin with an "R". But the idea is to come up with a system that works more times than not.

And it continues. C, A or R for North or South American wine producers. R or P for Australian producers. And the best one....M for European wine. If the producer, grape variety or region begins with the letter "M", the odds are the buyer will like the wine. I know it sounds whacky but for the novice, it will work.

Okay, that's it for my first post. I'm going to drink some wine.

Mark

Mark, glad you could join us. As I said, I think it was easy to see your program is for novices and I think it did that job very well. What I saw was a pledge drive program and I presume it was the only one you've made at this time? What are your plans for the show? And, just curious, but where did you shoot it and what were you all drinking during it?

Thanks also for the CAR explanation. Now, I'm not egging your house here, but even though you say it'll work for novices I think the advice is misplaced and is of no more value than saying "drink wines with labels that have birds or aquatic species but avoid those that have furry mammals, unless the mammal has a hairless tail." I think the nature of what you're informing novices with CAR is not something which will help them make that leap from novice to beginner to advanced beginner, etc. Everything else you did on the program has a basis in fact that when the novice is ready to learn more, he or she will be able to build on the base that you've given them.

But as we all recognize here, not only are there consistently good wines that don't begin with CAR, there are bad wines that begin with CAR. It's not information based on a fact that people can learn from when they're ready. And that's why I think CAR stands as something completely different from all the other advice you pass along to the novice.

Again, I think you've done well. I'd be happy to see more. If your program was around 20 years ago you'd probably have saved me from drinking a lot of shit wine! Now how do I get my hands on one of those snazzy pocket wine guides? <_<

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Can I reply to my own post? I don't have a clue how this works. But I realized it wasn't Crescent who thought I was incredibly dull, it was B.A.R....just wanted to make sure I didn't misrepresent Crescent.

I know this is a board of real wine folks and I can imagine that folks like B.A.R. WILL find my show dull. And even worse, wrong. But you folks are not my target audience. I am trying to give novices practical information that they can use to better approach wine.

But I would still love to hear your critical comments. Just don't egg my house.

Hey Mark - I am not a novice and I really enjoyed your show! Your enthusiasm was contegeous. Rules of thumb are exactly that - to be taken with a grain of salt or a glass of wine.

I heard last week that you were picked up by 200 stations. Congratulations. Keep the energy going - and let me know if you ever need "guests" on your show!

Cheers,

Scott

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