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Sushi Sono, Wincopin Circle in Columbia - Chef "King" Comes From Sushi King


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Tosca is a top-three restaurant in the DC-area (with Sushi Sono and Marcel's) ,

Excuse my ignorance, but where is Sushi Sono? Can't say that I've ever heard of it, but if it's truly in the same class as a Tosca or Marcel's, I think I need to make it a point to try it.

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Excuse my ignorance, but where is Sushi Sono? Can't say that I've ever heard of it, but if it's truly in the same class as a Tosca or Marcel's, I think I need to make it a point to try it.

Perhaps this is it? Click

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I worked in Columbia/Baltimore for 10 years, and was a frequent visitor to Sushi Sono.

It's a very nice place, great location, serene atmosphere. Prices were pretty good, and the sushi was very good.

If you're in the Howard County area, it's definitely worth a stop, but it's not worth a drive from DC. They're not as cheap as Kotobuki, as good as Sushi-Ko, or as inventive as Kaz, for example.

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Many parts of the following may look familiar to you, Don :lol:

The best restaurant, in my opinion (and the Baltimore Zagat, though it is not the basis for my opinion), Sushi Sono is by far the best restaurant in MD--if not in the entire DC and Baltimore area.

In full disclosure, I am not a booster, related to a booster, or affiliated in any way to Chef King or Sushi Sono. I am just that passionate about Sushi Sono!

My dining companion and I always dine there "chef table" and have the most fantastic experiences--every single time. The chef-owner (Chef King, who also owns Sushi King but exclusively works at Sushi Sono) is an amazing talent who brings the best fish to the DC-Baltimore area--even better than NYC's best Japanese restaurant (at least according to Zagat), Sushi Yasuda.

At Sushi Yasuda, we had a trio tasting of salmons, tunas, mackerels, and yellowtails, along with non-fish items. They have the best non-fish items (uni, oysters, sea eel, squid) and some special fish (sardine from Chiba, Wild Alaskan Ivory Salmon, and Sockeye Salmon).

However, Sushi Sono is by far superior for delicate, sophisticated sushi-connoisseur's fish. Chef King perfectly weaves in creativity within the lens of a purist. While he has plenty of options for the less discerning palates, Chef King truly stands out with his specials and makes any sushi-lover pant in anticipation :P Chef King knows how to bring out the best inherent taste of each fish/seafood item.

Our personal favorites include Bluefin Otoro nigiri, wild Aji sashimi, Seki Saba (mackerel from Japan), Kasugo Tai (baby snapper) sashimi, Snapper from Japan, Sweet Shrimp (nigiri and deep-fried heads), Yellowtail Belly, and Uni. Other specialties we love are the Dragon Roll (sweep shrimp tempura, avocado, and masago wrapped in white seaweed, topped with lobster), "Spicy Salmon" (it's the most divine slice of salmon that's really refreshing), Chutoro Tartare (more on this later), Geoduck sashimi, and Giant Clam Soup. Among non-cooked items, we love the miso-marinated broiled Black Cod and Yellowtail Jaw broiled with Salt. The seafood soup is also very popular, but we personally prefer the soup made from Aji or Kasugo Tai.

We once indulged in a Wild Bluefin Otoro (available in late-autumn, only) Chef King had flown in from Boston for that day that is like no other toro we had from anywhere else, truly unique in taste and appearance--beautiful alternation of red meat and half inch striations of fibrous fat. When the wild version is not available, you must try the Otoro torched—truly a sublime experience. Either way, Otoro comes paired with a fresh preparation of wasabi, which in it of itself is worth noting. Chef King's fresh wasabi is truly unique, and totally superior to the freshly grated stuff we had to pay extra for in places like Sushi Ko.

The Aji and Kasugo Tai come from the whole fish, which after being filleted for sashimi and/or nigiri, comes with the choice of having the remains deep fried or lightly cooked as a soup (ginger or miso). We tried all three, and surprisingly, the miso soup is the best for both fish. The miso soups accompanying the Aji and Kasugo Tai are the most exquisite seafood-based soup we've had at any restaurant.

As alluded to, Chutoro Tartare is by far the best form of fish tartare/crudo/carpaccio regardless of cuisine--EVER! This refreshing specialty is perfect for those hot summer days. The symphony of flavors strikes the perfect harmony, from the impeccably fresh and moderately fatty tuna, slivers of chives, divine soy sauce (good to the last drop), and flecks of fried onions--wwoww!

Our favorite dessert at Sushi Sono is ordering the uni nigiri--sweet, nutty, and like standing on a boat taking a deep breath of fresh ocean air!

The ultimate taste test for us came when I went with a wealthy sushi-snob uncle from Corea. He likes to dine at the finest sushi restaurants in Corea and has gone to Japan to indulge in sushi. That said, he was thoroughly impressed by the quality and taste at Sushi Yasuda. Not only was our experience a fraction at what he would pay in Corea or Japan, it was his absolute favorite. He even loved the udon and talked about it for days!

When he found out that Chef King was Taiwanese, my uncle was totally dumbfounded and could not believe it--also a totally eye-opening experience in it of itself for him!

So, how does Sushi Sono stack against the DC area's finest sushi places?

I've been to Makoto, Sushi Ko, Kotobuki, Tako Grill, Tachibana, and Matuba. I had been to Makoto on numerous occasions, but stopped going altogether when the quality of fish took a nosedive--who would want to pay an upcharge for their Omakase just to have so-so quality fish? Sushi Ko used to be the standard prior to Makoto, but to a real sushi connoisseur, it's decent and great only to the eyes of amateurs. Frankly, I would rather eat their cooked dishes than their sushi. I haven't been to Kaz Sushi Bistro, but I'm not interested because I’m a purist.

However, none of them are in the same league in terms of quality as Sushi Sono—really it’s like minor leaguer versus a professional hall-of-famer. As a sushi snob, I now save my sushi cravings for that 50+ mile drive to and back from Columbia. Even on the rare occasion when supply becomes limited (i.e. long holiday weekends), we always have a good time because he uses his creativity to dazzle with the more ubiquitous fish (i.e. "spicy salmon" that is barely seared salmon with a refreshing twist). Prior to Sushi Sono, we never ate salmon sushi--and we still don't, unless, of course, it's at Sushi Sono or Yasuda ;)

Maybe a few trips to Kotobuki now and then (kamameshi being key as well as a post-meal visit to the BlackSalt Fish Market) and hopefully another visit (soon?) to Sushi Yasuda, but Sushi Sono has spoiled my taste buds so that I cannot order sushi at the other places. Even if Sushi Yasuda were closer, I would alternate between Sushi Sono for fish and Sushi Yasuda for some specialty fish items and non-fish.

If you haven't been there, GO!!! :lol: :lol:

That's the restaurant. They're running a 33% off special during March (click here for details).

Warning: Sushi Sono gets very crowded on weekends.

Cheers,

Rocks.

We went once for a Friday dinner, and it was very crowded. Needless to say, we go at different times. A Saturday lunch, however, was quite leisurely and amazing as usual :lol:;)

I worked in Columbia/Baltimore for 10 years, and was a frequent visitor to Sushi Sono.

It's a very nice place, great location, serene atmosphere. Prices were pretty good, and the sushi was very good.

If you're in the Howard County area, it's definitely worth a stop, but it's not worth a drive from DC. They're not as cheap as Kotobuki, as good as Sushi-Ko, or as inventive as Kaz, for example.

Read my main posting <_<

Chinese sushi chef. Nuff said.

I understand your preconceived bias :rolleyes:

You're like my uncle who quickly had his mental schema shattered on his first visit.

Needless to say, our next visit came soon thereafter. In fact, I introduced him to many top places in the DC area including Tosca and 2941, but Sushi Sono is his very favorite :lol: :lol:

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I worked in Columbia/Baltimore for 10 years, and was a frequent visitor to Sushi Sono.

It's a very nice place, great location, serene atmosphere. Prices were pretty good, and the sushi was very good.

If you're in the Howard County area, it's definitely worth a stop, but it's not worth a drive from DC. They're not as cheap as Kotobuki, as good as Sushi-Ko, or as inventive as Kaz, for example.

Read my main posting :rolleyes:

I've been to Sushi Sono at least 20 times. I stand by my opinion.

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Many parts of the following may look familiar to you, Don :rolleyes:

My dining companion and I always dine there "chef table" and have the most fantastic experiences--every single time. The chef-owner (Chef King, who also owns Sushi King but exclusively works at Sushi Sono) is an amazing talent who brings the best fish to the DC-Baltimore area--even better than NYC's best Japanese restaurant (at least according to Zagat), Sushi Yasuda.

Having been to Masa last weekend, this quote is probably the most absurd thing I have read on a food board - this year, anyway.
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Having been to Masa last weekend, this quote is probably the most absurd thing I have read on a food board - this year, anyway.
I'd be surprised if a place in Columbia were able to get higher quality fish than Yasuda (3 stars from the Times under both Grimes and Bruni in case you consider Zagat less than reliable) or Masa without charging significantly higher prices than they list on their web site.

This is not to say that the chef may not have some kind of hookup somewhere - I'm fairly sure that Hama Sushi and Mikaku in Herndon take advantage of the fact that there are a couple of direct flights a day coming into Dulles from Tokyo, and there may be the same or similar coming into BWI. At the same time, I don't think for a second that Hama or Mikaku have their own personal agent at Tsukiji Fish Market picking out the prime toro like Masa does.

There's a difference between personally liking a restaurant, and demanding that everyone else on the planet agree that it's the best place ever. It's perfectly okay for GeorgetownFoodie to love Sushi Sono and rave about it. The "everywhere else is icky" approach is a little offputting, but if that's going to be his/her style, that's fine too.

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How do you feel about the quality of the food prepared at Western European-style restaurants that employ African-American or Laitin-American cooks?
I don't know if you're trying to interpret this as a racist comment. This is not a race thing. It's a training thing. This is also not about someone of another race knowing/being familiar with a cuisine. So maybe it wasn't 'nuff said.

The majority of sushi restaurants run by Chinese in the Baltimore area do not have classically trained sushi chefs. In Japan, classically trained sushi chefs apprentice and take up to a year or more to learn just how to make the sushi rice. It also requires a long time to learn how to properly handle and cut fish. Maximizing the flavor of tuna, for instance, takes a certain skill in knowing how far to let it "rot," as certain enzymes need time to work. You can read a lot more about it in Trevor Corson's sushi book.

So while it may be said that sure he could have had training, experience in Japan, or apprenticed with a master, the vast majority of Chinese sushi chefs in the Baltimore area do not, and I was, admittedly making a generalization.

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Chinese sushi chef. Nuff said.

My question for you is have you been to Sushi Sono? While GtownFoodie may have gone overboard in his praise, I have eaten at Sono a few times and it's very very good IMO. They have some inventive and tasty rolls which are not listed on the menu (make sure to ask your server). It's a pleasant space and decently priced. I couldn't care less where the chef is from, and I doubt you could tell he isn't Japanese by tasting his food. BUT, I understand the general sentiment, just as I tend to avoid eating sushi in Korean establishments.

I worked in Columbia/Baltimore for 10 years, and was a frequent visitor to Sushi Sono.

It's a very nice place, great location, serene atmosphere. Prices were pretty good, and the sushi was very good.

If you're in the Howard County area, it's definitely worth a stop, but it's not worth a drive from DC. They're not as cheap as Kotobuki, as good as Sushi-Ko, or as inventive as Kaz, for example.

I basically concur with DanielK - though I think the quality of the sushi may be as good as SushiKo's, we're probably splitting hairs here.

Having been to Masa last weekend, this quote is probably the most absurd thing I have read on a food board - this year, anyway.

But Masa is not a sushi joint that 99.9% of people could ever afford (me included). A more accurate statement might be that Sushi Yasuda is among the best, if not the best, sushi restaurants in NYC at a non-insane price. :-) Admittedly, I'm going mostly on reputation, but I have eaten at Yasuda and the quality of the sushi is as good as any I've ever eaten. And I love the design of the space.

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My question for you is have you been to Sushi Sono? While GtownFoodie may have gone overboard in his praise, I have eaten at Sono a few times and it's very very good IMO. They have some inventive and tasty rolls which are not listed on the menu (make sure to ask your server). It's a pleasant space and decently priced. I couldn't care less where the chef is from, and I doubt you could tell he isn't Japanese by tasting his food. BUT, I understand the general sentiment, just as I tend to avoid eating sushi in Korean establishments.

I basically concur with DanielK - though I think the quality of the sushi may be as good as SushiKo's, we're probably splitting hairs here.

But Masa is not a sushi joint that 99.9% of people could ever afford (me included). A more accurate statement might be that Sushi Yasuda is among the best, if not the best, sushi restaurants in NYC at a non-insane price. :-) Admittedly, I'm going mostly on reputation, but I have eaten at Yasuda and the quality of the sushi is as good as any I've ever eaten. And I love the design of the space.

I don't recall any qualifiers with regard to price in GeorgetownFoodie's original statement, just that Sushi Sono was better than NYC's "best" Japanese restraurant, which is Masa (apologies to Zagat - it makes a good phone book). I'm in no position to opine on the relative sanity of sushi pricing, but suffice to say that at first glance I do not believe the quality of fish to be equal, even to Sushi Yasuda (where I have been, albeit not as recently as Masa - July maybe? August?). I guess I will have to drive all the way up to see for myself, but color me suspicious, especially considering the source's track record here.
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I don't recall any qualifiers with regard to price in GeorgetownFoodie's original statement, just that Sushi Sono was better than NYC's "best" Japanese restraurant, which is Masa (apologies to Zagat - it makes a good phone book). I'm in no position to opine on the relative sanity of sushi pricing, but suffice to say that at first glance I do not believe the quality of fish to be equal, even to Sushi Yasuda (where I have been, albeit not as recently as Masa - July maybe? August?). I guess I will have to drive all the way up to see for myself, but color me suspicious, especially considering the source's track record here.

I never stated Sono the equal of Yasuda, but it is very good. And while I'm not defending the original statement that started this discussion, I do think it's silly for people to diss a restaurant without having been there. And there are multiple people who have written very kindly of Sono on this thread and elsewhere, so I think the skepticism isn't warranted.

As far as pricing is concerned, the last I heard Masa cost $350 per person and up. Is this still not the case?

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I never stated Sono the equal of Yasuda, but it is very good. And while I'm not defending the original statement that started this discussion, I do think it's silly for people to diss a restaurant without having been there. And there are multiple people who have written very kindly of Sono on this thread and elsewhere, so I think the skepticism isn't warranted.

As far as pricing is concerned, the last I heard Masa cost $350 per person and up. Is this still not the case?

Uhh, GeorgetownFoodie stated that Sono was equal to or better than Yasuda - I was not addressing your comments at all, just GF's, but thanks for thinking my skepticism isn't warranted. My "skepticism" isn't that I think Sono is a bad restaurant, per se (although you yourself agreed with DanielK that it wasn't worth the trip from DC), just that it is unlikely to have better quality fish than Masa or Yasuda. I don't think that qualifies as a diss. Of course, that's why I said I'd drive all the way up there to see for myself. Silly, right? Masa's pricing is irrelevant to this discussion, which is over for me. :rolleyes:
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Uhh, GeorgetownFoodie stated that Sono was equal to or better than Yasuda - I was not addressing your comments at all, just GF's, but thanks for thinking my skepticism isn't warranted. My "skepticism" isn't that I think Sono is a bad restaurant, per se (although you yourself agreed with DanielK that it wasn't worth the trip from DC), just that it is unlikely to have better quality fish than Masa or Yasuda. I don't think that qualifies as a diss. Of course, that's why I said I'd drive all the way up there to see for myself. Silly, right? Masa's pricing is irrelevant to this discussion, which is over for me. :rolleyes:

One last thought: Sono may not be worth a special trip from DC, but it's certainly worth a detour on your way back/to Baltimore. That's when I've been -- always for lunch -- on a drive home from Baltimore or north of Bmore. It's only like 10 minutes out of the way when traveling I-95. And a lunch time it's never been crowded in my experience.

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I am the daughter of King, owner and chef of Sushi Sono. I work a full-time job in the financial industry and have just recently gotten involved with Sushi Sono due to the amount of opinions and feedback that's been circulating on the web. Frankly, it's terrific that everyone of you (particularly to the ones who have actually posted) feel this strongly toward my father's place and the other places listed here. It's a shame that my father is unable to comprehend the full intent of each of your comments - I can translate, but the meaning itself truly gets lost in the translation. I also want to make it clear that, personally, him being a chef was a point of contention in our relationship. He was never present when I was growing up due to the fact he was ALWAYS in the restaurant - every day but Sunday were 14 hour workdays. I understand now the choices he made were on behalf of me - but it still would've been nice to have him around. So, besides the fact that he's my father, my comments are unbiased (whether or not you believe it is up to you obviously)!

This is my first time posting here as well.

I don't know if you're trying to interpret this as a racist comment. This is not a race thing. It's a training thing. This is also not about someone of another race knowing/being familiar with a cuisine. So maybe it wasn't 'nuff said.

The majority of sushi restaurants run by Chinese in the Baltimore area do not have classically trained sushi chefs. In Japan, classically trained sushi chefs apprentice and take up to a year or more to learn just how to make the sushi rice. It also requires a long time to learn how to properly handle and cut fish. Maximizing the flavor of tuna, for instance, takes a certain skill in knowing how far to let it "rot," as certain enzymes need time to work. You can read a lot more about it in Trevor Corson's sushi book.

So while it may be said that sure he could have had training, experience in Japan, or apprenticed with a master, the vast majority of Chinese sushi chefs in the Baltimore area do not, and I was, admittedly making a generalization.

Truly - I want to thank you for your candid comment - the "nuff said" part. It is because of thoughts like this that has pushed my father to excel and succeed. Your comment is not without truth. However, as it relates specifically to my father, who has been cooking since grade school (he was forced to drop out of grade school to help his parents pay the bills) and has had the lucky chance to apprentice under several great chefs in Taiwan and Japan, it is completely unfounded. He may not have attended esteemed culinary schools, but he has the actual training and experience to back up what he lacks under "formal" education. Also, he is truly passionate about the food he is making. Every plate he makes is about highlighting and bringing out the flavor and simplicity of the components without different sauces and unnecessary ingredients. No one can read or learn about this type of commitment to food - it's something that is innate. Someone can have all the technical skills, but without true love and appreciation for the food, the dish itself will always fall short.

BTW - we are from Taiwan. :rolleyes:

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Regarding the several comments of freshness and cost of the food: my father orders every day from the fish market in Jessup. When I was little, he used to take me with him before school and he'd show me how to pick out fish - which really didn't make sense to me at the time, but I'm glad now because I do not get ripped off with pricing nor do I take home old fish. The cost is fair since he has been dealing with the fish market for a VERY long time (although it's creeping up due to the economic crisis we're under). Therefore, he tries in every circumstance to pass the savings onto his customers. Even now, with all of his bills (business and personal) going up, he's having specials because he knows that people are running into issues and he's trying to help.

As for the driving debates going on ... I'm very appreciative for the people that drive from all over to have my father make a meal for them - and I know he is too. For the ones that don't think the drive is worthwhile, that's OK. Everyone has different personalities and his food may not strike your fancy, depending on what you like.

Again, thank you all truly for these comments. It is nice to know that his restaurant has made impressions on people's minds.

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Not a problem. If there is anything that any of you would like to share with me - your favorite dish, what is terrible, service, etc. - please do. I have extremely thick skin and it would be nice to help my father improve in anyways possible.

Jamie - I am SOOOOOO jealous that you got to interview Bourdain.

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Also, he is truly passionate about the food he is making. Every plate he makes is about highlighting and bringing out the flavor and simplicity of the components without different sauces and unnecessary ingredients.

Quite simply, this is why—along with super premium quality fresh ingredients—Sushi Sono and Sushi Yasuda (in Manhattan) are my two very favorite restaurants for sushi. My dining companion and I experience as much joy eating their preparations as watching Chefs King and Yasuda put their heart and soul into their creations.

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I recently had the pleasure to visit Sushi Sono and I must say: Wow, what a meal.

It was lunch, but it was extraordinary. Of all the dishes that I found impressive, the white tuna was the most memorable flavor.

The crispy spanish mackarel was amazing, too.

Highly recommended. Well done, King Chef!

And I must add that I am compelled by the story of his daughter written above. Touching, honest and yet more understanding of this very talented chef.

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Sushi Sono has added two new rolls -- master pieces of fish and vegetables that push their already-imaginative food. The new rolls come on top of one of the best restaurants in Howard County. It's pricey. About $50 for three large rolls, a soda, and edamame. But those rolls are unique and inventive:

  • The "sunshine roll" -- tuna with crunchy seaweed topped with spicy tuna tataki and a dallop of mango sauce. It's a spectacular roll. Fish with the spicy edge, the sweet of fruit, and the crunch of the seaweed. Special seaweed, the Sushi Sono folks explained. Cooked to create the crunch. Not the crackling of a cracker, but more the crunch of bean sprouts.
  • The "sushi nugget" -- cooked tuna with onion, topped with scallop and then baked. You get five pieces laid on their side. It's rich and cozy. The wrapper has a slight crunch, but the real flavor comes from the fish and, I think, some type of sauce.

The sunshine roll matches the No. 12 roll that the Columbia restaurant introduced earlier this year. That was a delicious roll with a tempura shrimp topped with tuna and a spicy sauce. The sunshine is light and flavorful. The tuna is spiced, then seared before its sliced on top. The roll fulfills sushi's best promise of fresh fish dressed up for a party.

In contrast, the sushi nugget was a complete surprise. The roll comes hot. It's not the clean, light notes of most sushi. The warm, mellow flavor comes more like a winter soup, a restaurant soup where someone with skill has balanced ingredients into some special. It's closer to Volt than a sushi bar. Rich and concentrated like a stuffed mushroom, but sweet with the scallops on top.

I don't throw Volt around lightly. This was a dish that someone thought about. "Small plate" cuisine where some chef has experimented and turned out bites that I couldn't figure out, let alone replicate. Worth a drive from either city.

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Has anyone been recently, say in the last six months? I'm helping a friend out Monday leaving her car in the auto park off 29 for a few hours on Monday and need someplace to have lunch. If not, any recommendations from Burtonsville to Columbia? Very open to all cuisines.

Thanks

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Has anyone been recently, say in the last six months? I'm helping a friend out Monday leaving her car in the auto park off 29 for a few hours on Monday and need someplace to have lunch. If not, any recommendations from Burtonsville to Columbia? Very open to all cuisines.

Thanks

Much too late to be of help to you but we had dinner here about two months ago. It was our first visit and, in a word: impressed. Didn't know the whole back story or history on this thread but it all makes sense. Excellent quality fish maybe somewhat similar to Sushi Capitol in a much larger and more elegant venue. Wouldn't compare this to spots like Yasuda (or, even better in NYC imho, the newer Nakazawa), but we thought very good and worthwhile for a trip up from the District.
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We did go on Monday the 19th and had a great meal. We mostly ordered off that days specials board which I would recommend unless you're on a budge. his was a birthday splurge for me. We shared all the food we ordered.

While I usually don't order complicated rolls, I prefer nigiri style sushi, we had a scallop and king crab roll. It was quite good but I have waited too long to write this and can't remember what else was on it. $16

Next was the bluefin deluxe. 3 pieces of tuna ranging from high quality toro to unbelievable almost white from the amount of fat otoro. The last time 
I had otoro this good was at Mac's seafood market in Wellfleet on Cape Cod where I saw it being cut from the collar of a fish caught the day before. $18 and a bargain for the quality.

I wanted to try the whole fish of the day which was KIng Mackerel. It was presented as a combination of half sashimi and half nigiri sushi on either side of what remained of the fish. It came with a special ponzu sauce which suited it much better than soy sauce. After you finish eating the raw fish, you are given the choice of having the rack of bones made into a brothy soup or deep fried. We chose to have it fried. A great crunchy snack, you can eat all of it except for the spine and part of the head.

Instead of having one of the ice creams for dessert, I chose another savory option. I'm wary of ordering uni (sea urchin) in most places because it really needs to be very fresh and not have been frozen. My lunch partner had never had it. After her first bit, she said: OMG my mouth feels like I'm at the beach and running  in my bare feet along the edge of the water. Good uni should take like an ocean breeze, so this was perfect.

Service was excellent, attentive without being annoying. We arrived right after they opened, seated by the windows with a nice view of the lake and were the only ones  in the restaurant for the first 15 minutes, but it soon filled up completely. We only ordered one item at a time and spent a little over 2 hours there and never felt rushed.

We had tea as well as 2 large warm (house) sake flasks and the total with tax and tip was ~$130. I look for going back and recommend Chef Kings food for anyone looking for quality sushi.

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Sorry to say that my first experience here was rather disappointing compared to its reputation.  The positives are pretty high quality fish and rice.  Downsides are price, limited range of sushi/sashimi offerings, and a rather awful iceberg salad dressing (may be petty of me, but as a big fan of Momo's fantastic iceberg salad, Sono's inedible version was a big disappointment for me).

And while most of the fish in our sashimi moriawase were good (especially a tender flavorful octopus), the tuna cuts were sinewy.  I would say that at this price level, I'd stick to Sushi Taro, where we had some very good sashimi earlier last week.

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Sorry to say that my first experience here was rather disappointing compared to its reputation.  The positives are pretty high quality fish and rice.  Downsides are price, limited range of sushi/sashimi offerings, and a rather awful iceberg salad dressing (may be petty of me, but as a big fan of Momo's fantastic iceberg salad, Sono's inedible version was a big disappointment for me).

And while most of the fish in our sashimi moriawase were good (especially a tender flavorful octopus), the tuna cuts were sinewy.  I would say that at this price level, I'd stick to Sushi Taro, where we had some very good sashimi earlier last week.

Interesting. We've only been 2 or 3 times and never ordered an iceberg salad so can't comment on that other than thinking maybe just a badly designed dish? The sinewy tuna surprises some since agree the fish quality here is high and has been for us without exception across the couple or few visits. It's not inexpensive so would definitely let them know if any fish was unsatisfactory.

We love Taro also but think dinner there a couple of notches higher on price.

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It's the iceberg salad accompanying the miso soup that comes with their entrees.  The ingredients were fresh and it was clearly intended to be presented this way, but the flavor was yucky to me.

Interesting that you thought the prices were a couple notches lower than Sushi Taro.  We actually thought Sono's prices were higher than the equivalent items at Sushi Taro, albeit for portions that are somewhat bigger than what we get per order at Sushi Taro.  (Though it's really easy for me to go crazy with Sushi Taro's menu, since they typically have so many choices for both raw fish and small plates.  It's easy to order a couple rounds and then be faced with a big bill.)

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