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Next question before I get started. Can I use Active Dry Yeast for this recipe? I used the Active Dry for the Almost No Knead Bread above. Thanks!

I just saw this (sorry). I am not familiar with the recipe, but if it calls for 1/3 biga as a starter, fresh yeast will not give the same result. You will be better off using a recipe that uses yeast alone as a leavener. If you already started, you will probably get a nice loaf of bread, it just won't have the texture and flavor of one made with the dough starter.

On a different note, the challah was fantastic, although mine was a bit lumpier than their picture. I used about half whole wheat flour, and wished I had put in more apples. Here is a link if anyone wants to try it. It works fine in the KA mixer with a dough hook.

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Just prepped my first ever batch of classic dinner rolls, didn't read the part about the butter and the eggs being at room temperature :angry: . I'm keeping my fingers crossed. Also I'm not sure a warm non-drafty place exists in my house today.

I have been anxious to bake bread but I think our house is too cold to do it this winter...

I baked cupcakes this evening and need to frost them before taking the little guy to school in the morning.

Planning corn muffins and brownies during the day tomorrow as part of a meal to take to a friend who recently lost her husband.

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I have been anxious to bake bread but I think our house is too cold to do it this winter...

I baked cupcakes this evening and need to frost them before taking the little guy to school in the morning.

Planning corn muffins and brownies during the day tomorrow as part of a meal to take to a friend who recently lost her husband.

Unless you live without heat the cooler temps will only make the rising times longer. You can make a quick proofing 'box' using a large trash bag. Put the dough and a bowl of very hot water in the bag and close it up. In time you will figure out the best temp for the water to keep the bag around 80F.

And speaking of baking, over the weekend I made a batch of croissants. It had been a too long since the last time I made a laminated dough. Since it was as easy as I remembered danish will be next on the list.

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I'm wondering if I can use 1% milk instead of whole milk for this. I'd like to use up what I have vs. going out just for milk. Thoughts?

I actually usually just use skim and it turns out fine (by "fine," I mean it seems to serve the desired purpose of keeping the holes to a reasonable size. I once made a batch without milk and the "holes" were so large that I ended up with essentially one hole - a loaf that was more or less solid on the bottom (with minimal holes) with the top crust standing off significantly. With the skim milk, the holes are more evenly distributed.) I once used 2% milk and didn't get results any different from the skim.

Which is the long way of saying "yes."

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I just saw this (sorry). I am not familiar with the recipe, but if it calls for 1/3 biga as a starter, fresh yeast will not give the same result. You will be better off using a recipe that uses yeast alone as a leavener. If you already started, you will probably get a nice loaf of bread, it just won't have the texture and flavor of one made with the dough starter.

Good point. I don't think monavano was contemplating skipping the biga step, but if so, I should qualify my "yes" to mean that you can use active dry yeast to make the biga and then to supplement the biga when you make the dough, but you shouldn't skip the bioa step and use soley active dry yeast.

And sorry I haven't figured out how to reply to multiple posts in one response. . .

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And sorry I haven't figured out how to reply to multiple posts in one response. . .

{Hit the "Multiquote" button on all the posts you want to reply to, then hit "Add Reply" and it will bring them all into the reply box.}

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Unless you live without heat the cooler temps will only make the rising times longer.

And the extended rising time will only enhance the flavor of the bread. In fact, some recepies call for an extended (12-24 hour) rise in the refrigerator rather than on the counter in order to develop more complex flavors.

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Planning corn muffins and brownies during the day tomorrow as part of a meal to take to a friend who recently lost her husband.

Oh no! Sending warm, comfort thoughts to your friend.

To stay on topic - failed cookies. How does one do that?! <- A: Never bake multitasking.

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Oh no! Sending warm, comfort thoughts to your friend.

To stay on topic - failed cookies. How does one do that?! <- A: Never bake multitasking.

The first time I made cheese straws, I forgot the flour. I ended up with a tray of melted cheese and butter.

Right now, biscotti. But the oven wasn't at the right temp so i upped it. It's not calibrated and went up 50 degrees higher than it should have. hoping I haven't lost the batch.

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Good point. I don't think monavano was contemplating skipping the biga step, but if so, I should qualify my "yes" to mean that you can use active dry yeast to make the biga and then to supplement the biga when you make the dough, but you shouldn't skip the bioa step and use soley active dry yeast.

And sorry I haven't figured out how to reply to multiple posts in one response. . .

Cook's Illustrated Ciabatta

I used the active dry yeast and made the biga.

Good morning biga!

The dough was sticky and wet, as promised. I allowed it to rest under my countertop lights each time and got the dough a bit closer to the heat by propping it up on top of another bowl. I also gave it a bit more time to rise and develop.

4327105863_00d4a225a5.jpg

Loaves.

Crust and crumb.

The biga developed nice taste and I really like the pull and chew of the bread.

Also, the video with this recipe really saved me with its "how to" guidance.

{Hit the "Multiquote" button on all the posts you want to reply to, then hit "Add Reply" and it will bring them all into the reply box.}

Thanks-I've been scratching my head over this.

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[

Loaves.

4326166274_3712bb3c2a.jpg

Crust and crumb.

4327832592_2276431945.jpg

That is EXACTLY what my loaves look like - inside and out - when I bake mine. I originally thought that this fact shouldn't be odd, but then realized why it is - I have an identical cooling rack. . .

I don't see an icon for Twighlight Zone music.

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That is EXACTLY what my loaves look like - inside and out - when I bake mine. I originally thought that this fact shouldn't be odd, but then realized why it is - I have an identical cooling rack. . .

I don't see an icon for Twighlight Zone music.

They really did look like a cute pair of slippers!

I'm glad you had similar results; I must be on the right track. While not quite like Eve's ciabatta, I was pleased and encouraged to explore more bread baking.

Next up: sour dough bread from The Bread Baker's Apprentice.

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Next up: sour dough bread from The Bread Baker's Apprentice.

Please let me know how it goes. I've enjoyed reading the Bread Baker's Apprentice but have been scared off by his frequent reference - and rigid adherence - to specific temperatures. I'm just not that precise.

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Unless you live without heat the cooler temps will only make the rising times longer. You can make a quick proofing 'box' using a large trash bag. Put the dough and a bowl of very hot water in the bag and close it up. In time you will figure out the best temp for the water to keep the bag around 80F.

And speaking of baking, over the weekend I made a batch of croissants. It had been a too long since the last time I made a laminated dough. Since it was as easy as I remembered danish will be next on the list.

You can also proof in the microwave or oven. I just nuke 2 cups of water in a pyrex measuring cup and leave it in the microwave or oven with my dough with the power off. I've also had success putting dough in a turned off oven with just the light on to provide a little extra warmth.

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It's not bread but I am baking Ina's Gartens Coconut Cake with a few modifications.... I also have some bread from "Healthy Bread in 15 minutes a day" ready to go....but I am not too hopeful for that.

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This morning it was poppy seed bagels. Tomorrow is SF style sourdough bread.

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English muffins in preparation for a morning toasting

Does your recipe require the use of crumpet rings to make them?

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This weekend, I made the Rustic Italian Bread from "Baking Illustrated." It's a good loaf, but I think not quite right. I'm not sure I kneaded it or let it rise long enough. The dough was still pourable when it came time to turn it and to shape it (I would never have gotten it onto the parchment-covered baking sheet without Azami's assistance). It has a more open crumb than I expected, but the flavor is good and the crust is very crisp (another clue to the wrongness: I didn't have to spritz the loaf with water to get a crisp-ass crust). I'll probably make it again as another weekend project to try to get it "right".

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NYTimes-Bittman-Sullivan no-knead bread, augmented with some whole wheat flour and flax seeds. Actually gave it a minute or two of kneading before forming loaf, though. Nice loaf.

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About to make some lemon curd for lemon curd pies, with a kick of some sort tbd. The lemons goes along with news I was just dealt with - I need to stop getting lemons.

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About to make some lemon curd for lemon curd pies, with a kick of some sort tbd. The lemons goes along with news I was just dealt with - I need to stop getting lemons.

Hey, no scurvy!

(coy envy rush)

(over shy cuny)

(hun very cosy)

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I've dug into some of Peter Reinhart's stuff (from his newer book Artisian Breads Every Day) over the last few days of being stuck in my house. I was really happy with how the pizza dough turned out. Never having tried the cold rise process, I've been impressed with its results. I have another batch of dough in the fridge now that I will probably let go for another 24 hours (it just hit its 1st day in the fridge) to see what that does to the taste.

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