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I was in France (Paris, Rouen, Amboise) back in April, and so it's all basically a blur at this point. So, here are some quick hits: Our concierge scored us a lunch seating at Septime, and it wa

This brief review will include the restaurants visited on our two most recent trips to Paris. Now that Don is asking for detailed reviews of 3-Mich restaurants, I will start to add more "color" there.

A group of six of us just got back from a ten day holiday in Paris, Rhone and Champagne where we got to experience the 2015 vendange. It was a pretty awesome trip. High points listed below including s

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crazeegirl said:
Good question...I am planning on staying for 5 nights.  I can see myself splurging 3 dinners ($200-400/pp)...I realize getting reservations is another hurdle!!

Couple bistro fares and cheap but good eats would be great.

Get in touch with LeCinq immediately. As Joe mentioned, L'Astrance is another excellent choice, but if you were thinking of going to any of the ***ed restaurants, LeCinq is the best bet. Note, if you are staying at the George V (as we were when we went this April) reservations are much easier to come by.

I'd also recommend L'Atelier de Joel Robuchon for a great dinner that won't be up in "splurge" ($200-400/pp) territory.

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Agree that, for me, Le Cinq is the three star (there are nine) that I would return to. It has the former chef who helped build Taillevent's reputation. Pierre Gagnaire is the "cutting edge" three star if you are into this. Ducasse is there but, personally, since he now seems to be everywhere this does not have the same attraction for me.

L'astrance is the most difficult reservation in Paris and worth the effort. Two months to the day. Yes, this means waking up at 4:00AM and calling them. Take lunch if this is the only time you can get in. I have actually built business trips around this.

One of my better "reviews" on CH was this about L'atalier which I wrote several weeks after it opened:

Please read the above if you have time. I put quite a bit of thought into it (most of my posts anywhere I don't even proofread!) knowing that it was probably the first post on this restaurant on any food board. It's been over a year since my last visit and it will be interesting when I go back next spring to see how it has evolved since I wrote the above.

I would also give serious consideration to Jamin [Now Café Jamin and unrelated] (two stars, Robuchon's original location ((he was considered the all time greatest French chef when he closed his restaurant in the mid '90's in Paris)), Violon d'Ingres (Christian Constant and his wife, Catherine-a one star that, like Jamin, has dishes as good as any three), La Regelade (considered by many to Paris' best bistro) and yes, I would (and have)return to L'atalier du Robuchon. Especially the first day you are there since you'll probably be sleepy and looking for an early dinner.

"Dining in France" is a superb resource for Paris' better restaurants with links to numerous reviews and detailed info including phone numbers. CALL YOURSELF TO MAKE THE RESERVATION FROM HERE; MOST PLACES SPEAK ENGLISH. Most of the ones noted above are DIFFICULT RESERVATIONS. Particularly, L'Astrance, Le Cinq, Jamin, Violon d'Ingres, Taillevent. It is possible because of the recent rioting that busnenss may have fallen substantially but because your trip is two months out you should still start MAKING RESERVATIONS NOW.

Have a great time!

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I may be in the minority of this, but rather than try to cram three blowouts into a five day trip, I'd suggest that you vary the scale and elegance level. Part of Paris' charm is its excellent low- and mid-priced dining establishments. Tucking into a cozy cafe or brasserie where actual Parisians eat is valuable and wonderful in its own right. I think it was the esteemed AJ Liebling who wrote how pleased he was to have been poor when he first came to Paris: rather than just picking something from the Michelin galaxy, he learned to seek out low-priced establishments of extraordinary quality, and became acquainted with the braises, tripes and other "peasant" foods that were delicious in the right hands.

Not to say that one shouldn't get a night at Astrance. But, rather than facing nine brilliant and expensive courses the next day, you might want to try the Tripe Sausage at Au Petit Tonneau 20, Rue de Surcouf,75007 Paris, not far from the Tour Eiffel the next night and feel transported back to an earlier time; or, for something slightly more upscale and equally charming and delicious, the Petite Troquet, also in the 7th at Le Petit Troquet at 28, Rue de l'Exposition.

A guide to Parisian cafes can be found here on whitings-writings.com

There's also much to be said for shopping around for cheese, bread, wine and the many delights available at streetcorner traiteurs (prepared food sellers, like a deli but pure French) -- from eggs en gelee to chocolate dessert -- and having a hotel room picnic. You can use the money you saved for a bottle of killer Burgundy at the three-star of your choice.

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I am in total agreement with Waitman oon this. I would maybe do 1 blowout dinner but probably not.

There are so many wonderful bistros at affordable prices. I go to Paris at least once or twice a month. My recommendations would be, as follows.

Le Troquet

Chez Michel

Le Cerisaie

L'Epi Dupin

L'Entredgeu

Try checking Egullet.com and their France forum for recommendations.

PM me if you want to know more or if I can help in any way.

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Last minute changes...due to scheduling conflicts, such as work (yippeee!!), I have changed my trip to December 22-30. As much as I am filled with excitement (oui! oui! first time in Paris), I have NO reservations. Are restaurants/bistros open during Christmas? I have been told I should make reservations at bistros. Is it too late?

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I was in Paris last christmas and had no problem finding places to eat......of course, I was also not going for a high end foodie experience either.

I would suggest that if you can get into one of the better restaurants on christmas eve, it's really worth the experience. It definitely felt like that was the night to be out celebrating.

Christmas day was a little more quiet, but there was still stuff open in the marais, the champs, and the latin quarter.

I found the "chain" brasseries were open and fairly easy to get into.

If it makes you more comfortable, you can make reservations online at the FLO brasseries.

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jparrott said:
Ambassade du Sud-Ouest [Closed Mar, 2017].  Raw FG and toasters on the tables.  Enough said.

Would I need reservations? Where is it?

So far I have reservations at Brassierie Flo for the 24th and at Atelier Joel de Roboucon for the 26th. Part of me tells me make more reservations, part of me tells me just go with the flow and let destiny take its course.

I am staying by by the Champs Elysees so recommendations of bistros, bakeries (good croissants), gourmet stores around that area would be very very much appreciated.

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I am staying by by the Champs Elysees so recommendations of bistros, bakeries (good croissants), gourmet stores around that area would be very very much appreciated.

There's a Michelin Red Guide for Paris - not the "regular" Red Guide, but one with all the specialty and gourmet stores (traitteurs, chocolatiers, boulangeries, patisseries, viennoiseries, fromageries, serrureries just kidding but I think that's the most unpronouncable word in the language, etc.), arrondissement-by-arrondisement. It's indispensible, the problem being: it's written in French.

Who the hell has mine? TK? Babka? I lent it out to someone and now it's gone - if I get it back you can borrow it; if not you can find one at a bookstore, maybe even at the airport.

A la votre,

Rocks.

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crazeegirl said:
Would I need reservations?  Where is it?

So far I have reservations at Brassierie Flo for the 24th and at Atelier Joel de Roboucon for the 26th.  Part of me tells me make more reservations, part of me tells me just go with the flow and let destiny take its course. 

I am staying by by the Champs Elysees so recommendations of bistros, bakeries (good croissants), gourmet stores around that area would be very very much appreciated.

Tea/sweets:

Ladurée (the one at 16 rue Royale 8e) for amazing macaroons, praline millefeuilles and afternoon tea. There is one on the Champs-Elysées which is also nice, but try to visit this original location, established in 1862

Lunch/Dinner:

L’ANGLE DU FAUBOURG [Closed Jan, 2012]

195, rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré

Paris 8

Tel: 01 40 74 20 20

Fax: 01 40 74 20 21

1 Michelin star

Same owner as Taillevent. It's a lovely, modern restaurant located right by the cozy Taillevent wine store (Les Caves Taillevent, 199, rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré). If you are on the rue du Faubourg during Les Caves business hours, stop by for a tasting. Usually they are offering the same gougeres as at Taillevent, freshly made throughout the day.

L'Angle du Fabourg and Les Caves were within walking distance of our hotel just off the Champs-Elysées - the Hotel Lancaster (7, rue de Berri, Champs-Elysées 75008) which also has a wonderful 1-star restaurant La Table du Lancaster with chef Michel Troisgros running the kitchen. Food & atmosphere have an asian flair. Beautiful courtyard.

La Table du Lancaster

tél : 01 40 76 40 76

fax : 01 40 76 40 00

e-mail : reservations@hotel-lancaster.fr

One evening we skipped dinner reservations altogether and ended up at the bar at the Hôtel Plaza Athénée (25 Avenue Montaigne) for champagne and appetizers of fois gras on toast & a plate of finger sandwiches. I would definitely do that again.

Have an excellent trip!

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This is my most detailed recollection of my experience and I hope it helps you...

Just make your reservations as early as you can. Reservations are strongly suggested in most high-end places. It’s easier to cancel than to get one. I don’t know if it depends on the time of the year, but when I was there, I found that a lot of the destination restaurants were closed Saturdays and Sundays because I think a lot of people go out of town for the weekend. By Monday and Tuesday when they were back, it was so difficult to get reservations. Save those interesting mom and pop bistros and brasseries for desperate last-minute places to go, they’re everywhere and always open anyway. Also since it’s your first time (I didn’t know during my first visit), it helps to know that all restaurant bills in France include tax and 15% gratuity (extra 5% tip if you really like the experience).

Getting around: remember what I mentioned to you about hailing cabs, DON”T, I think it’s a sign of disrespect for them. They’ll just either look at you or even give you the finger! You’re better off waiting by the designated cabstands with a blue sign (just like a bus stand). If you rent a car, parking can be a big challenge. The smallest (and cutest) Smart Car is the way to go, but cost more than the bigger cars because of limited parking space everywhere. If you take the subway, they only operate until midnight. The underground system is CONFUSING AS HELL if you don’t know where you’re going and if you don't speak French. It’s like a maze down there with lots of confusing signs. If you ask for directions—Parisians will usually tell you “it’s very close, it's just around the corner, just go there” but they give you roundabout directions—REALLY! Before you know it, you’ve walked 5 miles and spent half a day finding your destination! Always carry a map with you.

The best shopping area is along rue St-Honore (for hard-to-find goods in a lot of mom ‘n pop shops) and rue de Rivoli (for all the modern shops) close to the Louvre. Of course the Champs-Elysees for more modern shops and around Place Vendome for the high-ends shops. Anywhere around Ile de la Cite and Ile Saint-Louis (my favorite place) surrounding Notre Dame would be a nice place for a quaint stroll and lots of mom ‘n pop shops and brasseries. In Ile St.-Louis is where you will find Berthillon, rue Saint Louis en L’ile (famous for their sorbets and glaces, but I found to be just ok). And Brasserie l’Isle Saint-Louis in the very corner of rue Jean du Bellay and rue Saint Louis en L’ile that bridges Notre Dame and the island is where you can enjoy a great cup of latte while people-watching. This is the brasserie used in a scene in the modern version movie of Sabrina.

Since I know what it’s like to have extremely limited time to want to try restaurants plus how expensive it is for fine dining (price is the same for lunch and dinner and you can easily spend 500 euros for two for lunch or dinner with wines), I tried to list what I remember by arrondissement to help you narrow your plans (worth it or not). Multiple tasting menus are the way to go, but be prepared to dine for 2-4 hours:

MARAIS DISTRICT

3rd Arrondissement

Chez Jenny (casual)-39 bld du Temple

They’re open Fri, Sat. until 1 am. 1930s Alsatian brasserie fare with decent food and oysters. They have deep-fried hocks that are very interesting, if you like this kind of stuff. I would save this for a desperate moment.

4th

Hiramatsu – 7 quai de Bourbon

In Ile St-Louis

Japanese, but I heard they’re not doing well.

QUARTIER LATIN

5th

Tour D’Argent (super fine dining)– 15-17 quai de la Tournelle

Old style institution famous for their numbered pressed duck and magnificent view of Notre-Dame and Seine River. Don’t waste your time and money on this one. It’s very expensive for what you get.

SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRES

6th

Bouquinistes (casual) – 53 quai des Grands Augustins

A bistro owned by Guy Savoy, contemporary and modern, but nothing special.

LES INVALIDES

7th

Arpege (fine dining) – 84 rue de Varenne

The main floor dining room is better than the downstairs. Nice ambience, great service, style of food was just ok, expensive, good place if you’re vegetarian.

L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon – 5 rue Montalembert

They don’t take reservations but the wait is very long.

Voltaire (casual) – 27 quai Voltaire and rue de Beaune

Old Parisian institution, classic French cuisine, NOT TO MISS 1-POUND BRICK FOIE GRAS TERRINE APPETIZER they give you, if you’re ready to be foie gras(ed) out! The crab salad was excellent; don’t get the faux filet (nothing special cut of steak).

CHAMPS-ELYSEES

8th

Café Lenotre – 10 av des Champs-Elysees

I have not been, but this is where Chef Michel Richard came from before coming to the US.

Le Cinq (super fine dining in the Four Seasons Hotel George V) – 31 av George V

If you want to feel very pampered with great ambience, food, very professional and friendly staff.

Maison Blanche (very hip, modern) – 15 av Montaigne

A penthouse restaurant with a magnificent view of the Seine River, it’s better to dine in the evening with the view of the city lights. Dining is better in the lower level next to the wall-to-floor glass windows than on the upper level where the room looks unfinished and the flooring is all wood where you can hear every single footstep. Cool clubby music, very hip but food just ok with a lot of repetition with the use of ingredients.

Pierre Gagnaire (super fine dining) – 6 rue Balzac (a little hard to find, tucked inside the street off av des Champs-Elysees)

This is my absolute favorite where every dish is served with numerous accompaniments and every single thing went perfectly well together. Observing how the wait staff work is like watching ballet—flawless and amazing.

Spoon (casual, fusion) – 14 rue de Marignan (tucked in an alley-like street off av des Champs-Elysees)

A trendy Alain Ducasse restaurant, you choose your own mix ‘n match dishes. Don’t waste you time and money on this—our mix ‘n match experience tasted like medicine.

TROCADERO/MONCEAU

16th

L’Astrance-4 rue Beethoven

Reservations are very difficult, exactly 6 weeks in advance. I have not been, but Tom Sietsema always recommends this place.

Guy Savoy – 18 rue Troyon

Very expensive, but goes along the same line up there as Pierre Gagnaire.

MY 3 MOST ABSOLUTE, MUST-GO-PLACES-FOR-SPLURGING-IN-A-FINE-DINING-RESTAURANT AND FOR A PERFECT EXPERIENCE (cuisine, service and ambience) in this order:

PIERRE GAGNAIRE-I dream of going back there!

LE CINQ

GUY SAVOY

If you only have one week to spend in Paris and would like to try EVERYTHING, like myself, every single tip helps a lot! I wish I had someone to guide me during my very first visit, as I wasted a lot of time looking for places!

Au revoir!

Edited by Rissa P
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Guy Savoy was our best dining experience -- even better than Taillevent. It was also the most expensive dinner we've had anywhere -- (French Laundry included.) You know the credit card is in for a beating when the signature soup is 78 euros! It is fabulous though - artichoke soup with truffles served with warm mushroom brioche spread with truffle butter for you by the waiter. And the wine list is so large it travels with it's own table!

Edited by Camille-Beau
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Guy Savoy was our best dining experience -- even better than Taillevent.  It was also the most expensive dinner we've had anywhere -- (French Laundry included.)  You know the credit card is in for a beating when the signature soup is 78 euros!  It is fabulous though - artichoke soup with truffles served with warm mushroom brioche spread with truffle butter for you by the waiter.  And the wine list is so large it travels with it's own table!

If I'm not mistaken, GS will be opening his place in Las Vegas sometime next year. Robuchon is already there, along with several others. It's getting to be La Seine on the Colorado.

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Would I need reservations?  Where is it?

So far I have reservations at Brassierie Flo for the 24th and at Atelier Joel de Roboucon for the 26th.  Part of me tells me make more reservations, part of me tells me just go with the flow and let destiny take its course. 

I am staying by by the Champs Elysees so recommendations of bistros, bakeries (good croissants), gourmet stores around that area would be very very much appreciated.

For everything in one place, and an excellent selection. go to Galeries Gourmand. It is at Place Maillot, right off the Champs Elysee. You can walk or take the Metro there, it leaves you right at it! (Line #1) You can't miss it because it is in the underground shopping area right at Concorde Lafayette Hotel which is the tallest point in the area. Le Palais de Congres is also there. The wonderful thing about this place is that it is open Sundays!

There is a little wineshop called Vin D'or about 2 blocks from there, It is run by a charming Frenchman named Bruno. He usually has some excellent but inexpensive wiones available, he also has tastings on Saturdays from time to time.

If you need further details, PM me.

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BTW read my post on EG about Yves Camdeborde's place! If you can somehow make a reservation, do it. It is 40 euros for 7 courses. It is unbelievable. If you can't snag a reservation, try walking up and getting an outside table. It really is awesome! I absolutely love this man's cooking!

Edited by RaisaB
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BTW read my post on EG about Yves Camdeborde's place! If you can somehow make a reservation, do it.

sniff...Email reply:

Thank you for the interest shows for le Comptoir,unfortunately the

restaurant will be closed for the last week of december and in late January

for renovations.

Best regards

Philippe.

another one from L'Atelier Maitre Albert Restaurant avec Guy Savoy

Bonjour,

I m so sorry but the restaurant is closed between the friday december 23th and the tuesday january 3th 2006.

Sincerely yours.

Jacquet Laurent

The interesting thing is that they actually reply to emails!! I've been able to snag some reservations but many places seem to be closed. sniff. :lol:

[edited to remove triple spacing]

Edited by crazeegirl
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sniff...Email reply:

Thank you for the interest shows for le Comptoir,unfortunately the

restaurant will be closed for the last week of december and in late January

for renovations.

Best regards

Philippe.

another one from L'Atelier Maitre Albert Restaurant avec Guy Savoy

Bonjour,

I m so sorry but the restaurant is closed between the friday december 23th and the tuesday january 3th 2006.

Sincerely yours.

Jacquet Laurent

The interesting thing is that they actually reply to emails!!  I've been able to snag some reservations but many places seem to be closed.  sniff.  :lol:

[edited to remove triple spacing]

The French hospitality industry is old-school polite. If you write them a thank-you letter, you'll receive one back - often typed on a typewriter. It's a fine art of politeness that this country sorely lacks, and is but one of many things I love about the French.

Cheers,

Rocks.

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I will be taking a week long trip to Paris and London with my boyfriend and his very learge family over New Years. Since there are 9 of us going, we are looking for inexpensive restaurants that are close to the more touristy areas. There will be several teenagers going, so unfortunately nothing to adventurous. We are looking for restaurants in Paris and London, so I will also post this on the London thread. This is their first trip to Europe, so we are looking for some really good finds, like Wagamama's!!

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A restaurant that has good bistrot food and should be a lot of fun for teenagers is Roger la Grenouille in the 6th (metro: Odeon). Inexpensive by Paris standards. Their version of the bistrot classic salad of warm potatoes and herring in oil (which I adore) was probably the best I ever had.

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Under no circumstances eat in the touristy areas. You will get bad expensive food. Don't order sodas in restaurants.Wine is cheaper,or if not of legal age,ask for Une Carafe d'Eau. (carafe of tap water). What is your definition of inexpensive? Do you plan to have your large meal at night or at lunch? I know Paris pretty well so let me know and I will give you some suggestions. Try Egullet.com also,they have alot more on the subject.

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Since we are such a big group, we will probably all do our own thing for lunch or meet for dinner. We are staying at a hotel near the Eiffel Tower. Inexpensive meaning less than $25/person. Thanks

Under no circumstances eat in the touristy areas. You will get bad expensive food. Don't order sodas in restaurants.Wine is cheaper,or if not of legal age,ask for Une Carafe d'Eau. (carafe of tap water). What is your definition of inexpensive? Do you plan to have your large meal at night or at lunch? I know Paris pretty well so let me know and I will give you some suggestions. Try Egullet.com  also,they have alot more on the subject.

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Yeah -- you're going to get unadventurous first-times to eat herring. Good luck. :)

Though, The Hersh does make a good point that there are any number of decent bistros to be found where the unadventurous can get steak frites or roast chicken, while the more adventurous eat herring or tripe sausage (or frog's legs, though hopefully not Roger).

Here's a fun list, from which I pick one suggestion at random because I like the name (tranlates as "the worried mother" and the owners' affection for tourists.

La Mère Agitée

Le Domaine de Lintillac

La Mère Agitée is a back-street Paris bistro noted for its bonhomie and its punning cognomen. With a low-cost no-choice menu, it figures prominently in lists of recommended eateries. There's singing on Wednesday night and all week long there's a camaraderie among the out-of-towners who assume that they share a social impetus and a love of the honest peasant cuisine which is fast disappearing.

The burly, shiny-headed host is an unashamed self-booster. "We French don't appreciate real food any more," he proclaims to the whole room. "No butter, no fat - and we want tiny portions. We're ruining our own country. It's the tourists that keep me in business."

Edited by Waitman
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That is a great list but the only one where you may be able to get out under 25 EUROS is Le Domaine de LIntillac, but mostly duck is served there so good luck.

I will look up some Bistros later today or tomorrow and post them, though most I know are on the same list as Waitman. These average about 30-40 euros per person not including any drinks.

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Under $25 for dinner in Paris is very difficult; even under 25 euros is difficult. It might be doable at lunch, in ordinary neighborhood places that have a lunch menu. Some such places will feed you very well indeed for not very much. I remember, for example, having lunch a couple of years ago at a place called Brasserie Solférino on Boulevard St. Germain in the 7th--a very ordinary clattery corner joint. Their lunch special for the day was a beautifully cooked duck breast with a green peppercorn sauce, with pommes forestières and a quarter litre of red wine (and I think a little green salad), and as I recall the bill amounted to less than twenty dollars. And it was good. And then you might have a sandwich at a café for dinner, and with the money you saved that day, splurge on dinner the next.

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Would I need reservations?  Where is it?

So far I have reservations at Brassierie Flo for the 24th

How did you like Bistro Flo? It is a favorite of my wife and me. We try to get there every trip to Paris as well as to La H'uitre (The Oyster in case my Francais is incorrect). Small but easily found restaurant with excellent oysters (per the name), clams and shrimp.

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I'm actually going to be in Paris at the end of next week. For the third year in a row I have been trying to get into L'astrance and, once again, have not been able to get a reservation. Part of the problem is my lack of flexibility-I am committed to several business meetings and do not have the option of lunch or a night different than when I am there. Still, this is a restaurant that I would like to have tried. Curiously, as the years have gone by and their fame has spread, their prices have also risen. Dramatically. More than likely I'll end up at L'atalier du Robuchon which I've been to before or his new "casual" restaurant.

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I'm actually going to be in Paris at the end of next week.  For the third year in a row I have been trying to get into L'astrance and, once again, have not been able to get a reservation.  Part of the problem is my lack of flexibility-I am committed to several business meetings and do not have the option of lunch or a night different than when I am there.  Still, this is a restaurant that I would like to have tried.  Curiously, as the years have gone by and their fame has spread, their prices have also risen.  Dramatically.  More than likely I'll end up at L'atalier du Robuchon which I've been to before or his new "casual" restaurant.

I am envious. We snagged an early afternoon lunch reservation at l'astrance two years ago on our first trip to Paris and it was everything it is cracked up to be. The room is extremely comfortable; the food was prepared perfectly; the wines (which I had asked the waiter to choose after I narrowed my preferences to the Languedoc region) were exquisite; and the service was warm and impeccable. Even then it was expensive, but overall I thought it a good value for the two-hour+ experience.

We also found l'atelier du Robuchon to be a delightful eating experience. So many dishes to try; and only so much room in the stomach! We also had a great experience with the service there. I had selected a familiar, modestly priced wine; the waiter recommended another that he said was better, at a noticeably lower cost. It was better, and belied the notion that Parisians are difficult on Americans.

Let us know how the new casual restaurant turns out.

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http://www.chowhound.com/boards/intl5/messages/19460.html

is the link to my comments about L'atalier about three weeks after it first opened in 1983. Although they now accept reservations for only the first seating it is a very real advantage that with one's willingness to wait you can still get in. I also understand that on weeknights now, often there will not be a line. I would note in my comments above from 2003 that the kitchen staff is dressed in black. Today, Maestro's kitchen staff (Fabio excepted) is dressed in black. A statement and a presence.

Edited by Joe H
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Le Relais du Parc in late November started a "best of" menu faturing four dishes each from both Ducasse and Robuchon in their first collaboration. Gayot gives the "old" restaurant 15/20. Has anyone been to this since the addition of these dishes?

www.gayot.com/restaurants/features/relaisduparc.html

Curiously, I had no difficulty booking a table for this Saturday, a night when seemingly ever place that I tried was closed.

Edited by Joe H
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  I would note in my comments above from 2003 that the kitchen staff [at L'Atelier de Joel Robuchon] is dressed in black.  Today, Maestro's kitchen staff (Fabio excepted) is dressed in black.  A statement and a presence.

When I dined at L'Atelier in Vegas in October, they explained that Robuchon orders the black clothing because he wants the customers to focus on the food, not the chefs. Anyway, it's stylish. Black is the new black, as it were. :lol:

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Tour D’Argent (super fine dining)– 15-17 quai de la Tournelle

Old style institution famous for their numbered pressed duck and magnificent view of Notre-Dame and Seine River.  Don’t waste your time and money on this one.  It’s very expensive for what you get.

Tour D'Argent is now a one star restuarant.
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Dinner at Atelier de Joel Robuchon. Opting for "no wait" I made reservations via email before leaving for Paris for dinner at 6:30pm. Given the fact that lunch at L'Entregeu ended after 2pm, we had very little time to digest, but the walk from Champs Elysees to the Quartier Latin helped us digest...ready for more!!

Menu DecovertE

L'Amuse-Bouche [Cremeux de foie gras comme un capuccino]

La Coquille Saint-Jacques [crue, marinee aux graines de pavot grilles]

Le Pied de Cochon [truffe sur une tartine gratinee au parmesan]

Le Champignons [dans une royale, au coulis de persil et croustilles d'ail]

Le Rouget [sur une vierge aux agrumes et a la coriande fraiche]

Le Chataigne [en fin boullon au fumet de celeri et lard fume]

L'Agneau de lait [des Pyrennees en cotellettes a la fleur de thym]

Les Langoustines [en papillotes croustillantes au basilic]

La Tequila [givree aux fruits exotiques]

Le Chocolat [sensation avec un sorbet ivoire sur un cremeux Araguani]

[don, looks like the site is not allowing me to post more than 2 images!! help]

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Spending a few days in Paris next month and would love more recommendations in the low- to mid-priced range. Also, shops -- we'll be in an apartment and so we'll be able to prepare our own meals. The thread so far has some nice suggestions -- anyone got more?

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Spending a few days in Paris next month and would love more recommendations in the low- to mid-priced range. Also, shops -- we'll be in an apartment and so we'll be able to prepare our own meals. The thread so far has some nice suggestions -- anyone got more?

My favorite meal in Paris was at La Regalade (49 avenue Jean-Moulin, 75014 Paris (00 33 1 45 45 68 58) Closed Saturday lunch, Sunday, Monday). As you take your seat you are welcomed with a homemade terrine with cornichons...to die for...if I knew that they would later take it away when the appetizers were served, I would not have eaten it at a leisurely pace. The raw oysters were served with homemade sausage links, a new combination for me, but I SO SO SO hope that every restaurant that serves raw oysters would follow. We split a full order of pan seared foie gras, followed by a veal chop for two. Dinner concluded with to-die-for orange souffle and camembert. Dinner for two with 2 bottles of wine was around $130.

Of the places we tried that I would recommend are: Le Meurice, L'Atelier de Joel Robuchon, Pinxo, Cafe Flore, Ze Kitchen Gallerie, Pierre Herme, Laduree, Le Pied de Cochon, Angelina's, and L'entregeu. If you are interested in any of them, PM me, l can email you pictures of our meals.

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Add L'Ardoise and L'Huitre and Bistro Flo and Le Pied de Cochon to that list...there's also a good Korean restaurant about 3 blocks from the Tuilleries behind the big glass building. A bad meal in Paris takes some doing. We just got back and once again enjoyed every day and meal.

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The best meal of my life is still rated as the multi course meal I had at Guy Savoy. It was also by far and away the most expensive. This was several years ago.

We also tried La Tour d'Argent (was good, but not tremendous and the waiter warned us that the pressed duck was very very gamey, so we ordered off their tasting/sampling menu instead).

The third haute restaurant we visited was Le Grand Véfour. The restaurant was very beautiful, but the meal was not as impressive as the history of the restaurant's past diners and the decor all around.

For cheap eats I recommend L'Sargent Recruit near the latin quarter. Not sure if it is still around, but for around 25 Euros you got all the salad and deli meats you could eat in a basket (including pickles and so forth), soup, a decent meal, plus all you could drink house wine (not tremendous), and desert (their chocolate mousse was pretty good). It is all low key and not 5-star quality, but definitely a great bang for the buck considering.

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The miracle of my week in Paris is that I only gained two pounds.

Lots of recommendations to make. We stuck mostly to midrange bistros but had a really excellent meal at a place called Les Fables de la Fontaine (131 St Dominique in the 7th), more or less by accident. We'd wanted to go to Cafe Constant, but it was closed for the week, and the sign on the door directed us to try Les Fables only a few doors down, as they're both Christian Constant's places. They were not thrilled that we didn't have reservations, but found us a table nonetheless. Place was packed within five minutes. Minimal decor, exposed brick, the focus is all on the food. The menu is very limited -- only what's on the chalkboard, maybe five choices per course, and ALL fish and seafood -- but delicious. I don't know what merlu is, but it's some kind of mild white fish and it is stellar. My fish also came with a rich pasta gratin and my companion's came with a tomato/eggplant/mozzarella side. The bread is served with an addictive crabmeat spread. Two kirs, two apps, two entrees, and 50cl of wine came to about 120 Euro. I definitely recommend reservations, as it is small.

Cheaper, and with a much wider selection, was Le Comptoir (9 carrefour de l'Odéon, in the 6th.) My research and guidebook both indicated that Le Comptoir only offers a 40 Euro prix fixe menu in the evenings, but it is not so. We ordered off the menu, and what a lovely menu it was. Very warm service. My lobster bisque was a tad fishy but my seared tuna with tapenade, pistou, and roasted vegetables was flawlessly done. And the best part: a five-cheese plate from Fromagerie Boursault, for a mere 8 Euro. I think this came to 140 Euro for three people, three courses each, including wine. They do not take reservations, try getting there no later than 7:30.

Speaking of cheese, I was sadly thwarted by vacations (Barthelemy) and fromageries that weren't located at the address I had for them (Quatrehommes) but I still managed to eat my fill. At La Grande Epicerie we picked up morbier au lait cru, beaufort au lait cru, a German cheese with bacon in it, and chevre rolled in hazelnuts. All were excellent. We also picked up some bread and meat and made a picnic of it in the nearby Jardin du Babylone.

Also got a nice artisinal bleu and a camembert affinee in some type of alcohol -- maybe armagnac, maybe Calvados -- at the Cremerie de Carmes (47 boulevard St-Germain in the 5th.) Both were insanely strong, but great in small doses.

Foodie gifts for the family were picked up at L'Epicerie, 51 rue St-Louis-en-L'Île. Seriously, Wall O' Mustard. Do not miss. Mustard with cognac, with truffles, with shallots, with champagne, with cream, with various combinations thereof. Also many jams, cocoas, vinegars, and peppercorns.

Last but not least: after our midafternoon picnic we stopped for tea and pastries at Laduree (16, Rue Royale). I had an espresso, companion had a smoked tea. We shared four mini-macaroons with pistachio ice cream, and a treat I couldn't resist, as I've always wondered what they're like: a Gateau St. Honore. Traditionally this would involve pastry cream on puff pastry with a ring of profiteroles around the outside. Laduree's special version includes raspberry puree and a pastry cream flavored with rose. Not a bargain at 25 Euro for the meal, but worth every penny.

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Why not? We had some very nice Oregon Pinot in Paris and it wasn't that expensive. LaVinia in Paris carries a large selection of American wines at reasonable prices (not as reasonable as French wines but what would you expect?).

I was in the LaVinia on Rue de la Madeleine last month. I was quite impressed with their selection. Prices were as expected.

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I was in the LaVinia on Rue de la Madeleine last month. I was quite impressed with their selection. Prices were as expected.
We spend way too much time there when we're in Paris. Thanks Don for moving this. I wanted to get out of Nadia's forum.
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Obituary for Claude Terrail, restaurateur, La Tour d'Argent

The bit about hiding the cellar (a quarter-million bottles?!) during WW2 is simply fascinating. Can you imagine what the post-liberation celebration must have been like?

You should look for the book published fairly recently called "Wine and War" by the Kladstrups. It details the efforts to save the wine of vignerons and restaurateurs all over France during the war including La Tour d'Argent. Fascinating book full of things they don't teach in school. The Kladstrups have started a Wine and War tour around France, too.

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