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Stachowski Market and Deli, 28th and P Street in Georgetown, Featuring Jamie Stachowski's Charcuterie

Georgetown Charcuterie Market Deli

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#201 DanielK

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 10:06 PM

Actually, I think $13 probably is the current price of the Pastrami sandwich. It literally can feed 4 people for lunch.



#202 deangold

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 11:05 PM

Actually, I think $13 probably is the current price of the Pastrami sandwich. It literally can feed 4 people for lunch.

 

One time I got half an Italian grinder and most of half of a pastrami down by skipping the bread and taking from noon till 5pm to do so.  


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#203 DanielK

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 12:29 AM

One time I got half an Italian grinder and most of half of a pastrami down by skipping the bread and taking from noon till 5pm to do so.  

 

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#204 KeithA

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 04:01 PM

I really enjoyed the roast beef french dip sandwich today. It is a pretty large sandwich - although thankfully not gargantuan like the pastrami (I said it upthread that this is too big) - at $13 and worth it. A nice lightly crusty roll filled with a generous portion of rare warm roast beef topped with a few sweet and bunch of rather spicy peppers (I told them to hold the cheese). The dipping juice was piping hot and so flavorful you could tell this was the real deal cooking liquid from the meats with added aromatics - not some reheated beef stock that you often get with a dip sandwich.  I saw that they also have another roast beef sandwich done baltimore style with tiger/horseradish sauce - likely worth a taste next trip.



#205 DonRocks

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 03:44 PM

I phoned Stachowski's the other day and ordered a couple Pastrami Sandwiches ($14.99 each), and when I opened them, was surprised to find out that they were on thick-cut pumperknickel; not rye. Looking at the online menu, there's apparently a choice between the two, and I didn't realize the "default" was going to be pumperknickel (we had kind of a sketchy phone connection, and the gentleman on the other end seemed to be doing two things at once). 

 

Regardless, this was good pumpknickel, and you don't order these massive sandwiches for the bread - at $14.99, they're *easily* enough for two people, maybe even three. On one side of each sandwich was two slices of bread, so you had three slices of thick bread per sandwich. The pastrami was as good as ever, although it's amazing just how fatty the meat is - even the pieces that look lean. There was a nominal slathering of mustard on each sandwich, and each one came with a full, sliced dill pickle. 

 

Does anyone actually eat these as sandwiches? I've always opened them up on a plate (or in the foil), and picked up the meat, occasionally taking a bite of bread (I figure most people do this, and that's why they come with three slices of pumperknickel). 

 

Still the best pastrami sandwich in the area - gluttonous, New York-like, enormous, delicious, fattening - everything that's so right and so wrong about a great pastrami sandwich. It had probably been a year since I've had one, and they haven't changed a bit with the possible exception of the fattiness in the meat (but that varies on a slab-by-slab basis).


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#206 The Hersch

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 04:55 PM

Regardless, this was good pumpknickel

 

Funny, I had a sandwich with Stachowski's pastrami for lunch today, after buying a pound of it and making the sandwich at home (with a modest portion of the meat, which was superb as always).

 

I write now not to correct your spelling of "pumpernickel" (you need to lose the first k), but to inform the readership of the colorful derivation of the word. It comes from early modern German Pumper, fart, plus Nickel, pet form of the given name Nickolaus. In other words, it more or less means "farting Nick".

 

The OED article comments: Although the meaning of the earliest attestation of the word in German is not entirely certain, it is clearly depreciative. As applied to bread it was apparently also originally depreciative and was perhaps originally applied to Westphalian bread by outsiders. This type of bread was probably so called either on account of its being difficult to digest and causing flatulence or in a more general allusion to its hardness and poor quality.


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#207 DonRocks

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 05:41 PM

Funny, I had a sandwich with Stachowski's pastrami for lunch today, after buying a pound of it and making the sandwich at home (with a modest portion of the meat, which was superb as always).

 

I write now not to correct your spelling of "pumpernickel" (you need to lose the first k), but to inform the readership of the colorful derivation of the word. It comes from early modern German Pumper, fart, plus Nickel, pet form of the given name Nickolaus. In other words, it more or less means "farting Nick".

 

The OED article comments: Although the meaning of the earliest attestation of the word in German is not entirely certain, it is clearly depreciative. As applied to bread it was apparently also originally depreciative and was perhaps originally applied to Westphalian bread by outsiders. This type of bread was probably so called either on account of its being difficult to digest and causing flatulence or in a more general allusion to its hardness and poor quality.

 

:blink:

 

I corrected it on dcdining.com, but I have to leave the errors intact here because your comment is so priceless.


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#208 Barbara

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 10:04 PM

I meant to mention this a couple of weeks ago but forgot. Smucker Farms on 14th Street (a block or so above U and across the street from Kapnos) sells a variety of Jamie's sausages in their frozen meat section. And, since it is a whole lot easier for me to get to, I was very happy to learn this.







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