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What Are You Simmering Right Now?


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#1 jparrott

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 11:29 AM

Smoked goat chili. Texas style, no tomatoes. We'll see. But I have too much leftover goat to eat it any other way.

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#2 Meaghan

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 11:59 AM

Smoked goat chili. Texas style, no tomatoes. We'll see. But I have too much leftover goat to eat it any other way.

Simmering and sizzling are my favorite two verb cooking verbs. Do you deliver?

#3 Pat

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 06:17 PM

Right now I'm simmering an improvised chicken soup. My husband's not feeling so great, so other plans have turned into chicken soup.

#4 monavano

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 06:20 PM

Right now I'm simmering an improvised chicken soup. My husband's not feeling so great, so other plans have turned into chicken soup.

I did the same thing mysef today (not sick however) with chicken stock, some ginger, star anise miso, chili flakes and noodles. I topped it off with cilantro and a good squeeze of lime. Good phake pho. :(

#5 Pat

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 07:03 PM

I did the same thing mysef today (not sick however) with chicken stock, some ginger, star anise miso, chili flakes and noodles. I topped it off with cilantro and a good squeeze of lime. Good phake pho. :(

That sounds wonderful. I'm working more on the bland end of the spectrum, but I was planning to put a little miso in at the end, and simmering a couple of star anise in the broth sounds like a good idea. Thanks!

#6 jparrott

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 01:08 PM

Chicken stock. 20lbs of backs, 5lbs of necks, 6lbs of feet, two 20-quart stockpots. Mmmmmm.

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Anyway, I need f (4, 2) resolved to an integer value....


#7 zoramargolis

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 05:18 PM

Chicken stock. 20lbs of backs, 5lbs of necks, 6lbs of feet, two 20-quart stockpots. Mmmmmm.

Wow. That's restaurant quantity. Do you have access to a walk-in? If not, where do you plan to store all of that stock?

#8 jparrott

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 05:26 PM

Strain, chill overnight (according to New Pro Chef, the par yield for this much bones is about 16 quarts, as I don't count the amount of feet in determining par yield), de-fat, reduce to two quarts tomorrow (so 1/4 cup glace is a pint of full stock), chill again, cut the resulting Chicken Flubber into ~1/4 cup cubes, put each in a small ziploc bag, freeze in a large ziploc bag.

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Anyway, I need f (4, 2) resolved to an integer value....


#9 zoramargolis

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 05:42 PM

Oh. So, you're planning to reduce the contents of two twenty quart stockpots down to two quarts of chicken Jello. You could sell tickets to your house as a chicken soup steambath tomorrow. Be sure to save the schmaltz--use it for making confit and matzo balls. :(

#10 Pat

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 05:43 PM

chicken giblets for gravy to go with the chicken roasting in the oven

#11 Sthitch

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 06:10 PM

I just took 8 pounds of short ribs out of the oven after braising for 24 hours, now I am reducing the cooking liquid. The ribs were sent to me by my cousin from a mystery breed of cattle that he is toying around with raising, all he would tell me is that the breed is from the Alps.

#12 Anna Blume

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Posted 20 January 2008 - 03:20 PM

No stew, but lentil soup w pancetta and freshly roasted chestnuts. One reason to be grateful for a real winter's day.

#13 Pat

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Posted 20 January 2008 - 03:35 PM

Chicken soup. It smells wonderful and is making the kitchen warm.

#14 Al Dente

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Posted 20 January 2008 - 06:06 PM

Al's Hunk O' Brisket Chili. Turned out real good!

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#15 Soup

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Posted 21 January 2008 - 10:47 AM

put up garbi jhim (braised short ribs with root veggies) before I left this morning in the slow cooker. Will be ready come dinner time.

#16 monavano

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 10:39 AM

Actually, the simmering happened on Sunday, but this morning I drained and strained a big pot of chicken soup. This is the second time I've tried this method-place chicken parts, vegetables and herbs in the basket insert and make soup. Then, let cool a bit and store in the refrigerator until the next day. Skim fat off top and withdrawl basket and toss. Strain and place into chinese take out quart containers (man I eat a lot of hot and sour soup!). Freeze. I got about 10 quarts this time.
Right now, a pot is simmering with about 2 quarts of stock and carrots (with a bit of tomato paste). When it's hot, I'll add extruded farina, parmesan and eggs.

#17 jparrott

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 11:23 AM

Matzo ball soup. Never made it before. Oy, I'm nervous ;).

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Anyway, I need f (4, 2) resolved to an integer value....


#18 Al Dente

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 11:29 AM

Matzo ball soup. Never made it before. Oy, I'm nervous ;) .

I've always meant to make this, but haven't gotten around to it. Are you following a particular recipe? I can make a mean chicken stock, but don't have a clue about making a matzo ball.

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#19 Scott Johnston

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 11:34 AM

Try the simple matzo ball mix. Generally I am opposed to mixes, but this one is really good.

I've always meant to make this, but haven't gotten around to it. Are you following a particular recipe? I can make a mean chicken stock, but don't have a clue about making a matzo ball.


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#20 jparrott

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 11:35 AM

No schmaltz around, so mine was matzo meal, eggs, water, olive oil (sephardic!), salt, pepper.

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Anyway, I need f (4, 2) resolved to an integer value....


#21 johnb

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 12:04 PM

Chinese (Sichuan) red cooked beef--Fuschia Dunlop recipe in Land of Plenty. Smells and tastes pretty good so far. Due to the guest list I went easy on the chili sauce.

#22 Waitman

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 01:16 PM

A fucking basset hound-sized Zuni Cafe salt/milk cured Eco-Friendly wallet-unfriendly wascally wabbit that my wife and daugher both refused to eat on vague moral grounds, in a madeira/plum braise that was excellent. I have leftovers, if anyone's hungry.

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#23 zoramargolis

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 01:26 PM

Try the simple matzo ball mix. Generally I am opposed to mixes, but this one is really good.

No schmaltz around, so mine was matzo meal, eggs, water, olive oil (sephardic!), salt, pepper.

These two different approaches go to the heart of the matzo ball conundrum: floaters vs. sinkers. Which of the two you prefer tends to depend on what you ate when you were growing up. Me--I am strongly in the floaters camp. The ability to produce a fluffy, light matzo ball was adjudged to be the hallmark of a good cook, where I came from. And woe betide the hostess who served leaden matzo balls to guests--she would be privately mocked for years afterward. My mother discovered fairly early on that the most reliable way to serve light-as-a-feather matzo balls was to use Manischewitz Matzo Ball mix. Know why they are so light? Baking powder.

Want to know the best way to make fluffy, light matzo balls without a mix? Add some baking powder. Now this presents a major dilemma to the super-observant during Passover, since they eschew not only yeast, but all forms of leavening, including chemical. Which begs the question: we know that the ancient Jews were in such a hurry to leave Egypt, that they didn't have time to let the bread dough rise, hence all who have followed have been forced to eat matzo to commemorate this historical event. However, if there had been such a thing back then as baking powder, allowing a quick rise, don't you think the Jews would have used it, rather than eat crispy cardboard? I do.

In any case, the observant lovers of light matzo balls try all manner of techniques to achieve lightness without leavening during Passover, including beating the eggwhites separately, using carbonated water in the mix. I have never had success with either of these methods when I have tried them. I stick with Manischewitz mix.

#24 Mark Slater

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 01:58 PM

These two different approaches go to the heart of the matzo ball conundrum: floaters vs. sinkers. Which of the two you prefer tends to depend on what you ate when you were growing up. Me--I am strongly in the floaters camp. The ability to produce a fluffy, light matzo ball was adjudged to be the hallmark of a good cook, where I came from. And woe betide the hostess who served leaden matzo balls to guests--she would be privately mocked for years afterward. My mother discovered fairly early on that the most reliable way to serve light-as-a-feather matzo balls was to use Manischewitz Matzo Ball mix. Know why they are so light? Baking powder.

Want to know the best way to make fluffy, light matzo balls without a mix? Add some baking powder. Now this presents a major dilemma to the super-observant during Passover, since they eschew not only yeast, but all forms of leavening, including chemical. Which begs the question: we know that the ancient Jews were in such a hurry to leave Egypt, that they didn't have time to let the bread dough rise, hence all who have followed have been forced to eat matzo to commemorate this historical event. However, if there had been such a thing back then as baking powder, allowing a quick rise, don't you think the Jews would have used it, rather than eat crispy cardboard? I do.

In any case, the observant lovers of light matzo balls try all manner of techniques to achieve lightness without leavening during Passover, including beating the eggwhites separately, using carbonated water in the mix. I have never had success with either of these methods when I have tried them. I stick with Manischewitz mix.

Thanks Zora. Floaters are preferable to sinkers. But, really, now. Which came first? The matzoh or the ball? ;)

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#25 Anna Blume

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 03:24 PM

I had pet frogs when I was a kid. I can't bring myself to eat frog.

I had a pet chameleon and a pet mouse; my mother adopted a praying mantis that lived on a geranium in the kitchen. To this day, I can't do lizards, rodents or insects, either.

The old edition of the Larousse Gastronomique (the new edition is much less French and/or charming) they had a little drawing that told you how to tell a skinned rabbit from a skinned cat. I think I'll take it to the market Sunday to see if Bev is on the up-and-up, or just skinning us city slickers. ;)

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Is it Upton Sinclair or what that is behind our inability to buy game in this country, something Europeans can pick up at the market? Earlier this year, someone at Whole Foods was shilling venison from New Zealand, I believe, where the pretty little spotted fawns are treated humanely as they grow up as domesticated animals. The food isn't local because our over-abundant supply of deer isn't farmed.

#26 zoramargolis

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 09:31 AM

Is it Upton Sinclair or what that is behind our inability to buy game in this country, something Europeans can pick up at the market? Earlier this year, someone at Whole Foods was shilling venison from New Zealand, I believe, where the pretty little spotted fawns are treated humanely as they grow up as domesticated animals. The food isn't local because our over-abundant supply of deer isn't farmed.

The recent beef recall certainly echoes *The Jungle* doesn't it? But I am sure that the ban on game came from the same impulse to regulate food safety. During the 2007 Christmas bird count, Jonathan met a guy who grew up in Upstate New York on a farm where his father raised deer for restaurant venison. All manner of game is farmed. If you want wild game, however, you need to be or befriend a hunter. It isn't legal to sell it, although I do know that in some places, hunters can donate to organizations that feed hungry and homeless people.

#27 Al Dente

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 02:33 PM

Osso buco! One of my faves...

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#28 Pool Boy

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 02:46 PM

bouef borgoniogne (or however the heck you spell it)

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#29 Al Dente

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 02:56 PM

bouef borgoniogne (or however the heck you spell it)

I just call it Beef Borgnine...
borgnine.jpg

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#30 Pat

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 03:10 PM

pork shoulder in the crockpot

#31 Mark Slater

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 03:35 PM

I just call it Beef Borgnine...
borgnine.jpg

More like ham.....

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#32 monavano

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 04:23 PM

More like ham.....

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#33 pax

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 12:19 PM

I did baked beans in the crock pot yesterday that were the best I've ever made. My family is gobbling them.

#34 hillvalley

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Posted 23 August 2008 - 05:43 PM

Golden roma tomato sauce with basil, savory, and garlic.

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#35 laniloa

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Posted 23 August 2008 - 08:03 PM

Ratatouille with my haul from the farmers market. The markets I've found around here are really small --- 5-7 vendor small. Gotta keep checking out different markets until I find a decent one. The local peaches are just starting and they are mighty juicy and sweet.

#36 zoramargolis

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 07:05 AM

The local peaches are just starting and they are mighty juicy and sweet.

Where you are located in Massachusetts must be the upper northern limit for peaches, unless someone is bringing them in from a somewhat southern latitude. I seem to recall that the winters were too cold for peach trees where I lived in Southeast Vermont, right near the border with New Hampshire and Mass. Global warming may be changing that.

#37 laniloa

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 07:52 AM

Where you are located in Massachusetts must be the upper northern limit for peaches, unless someone is bringing them in from a somewhat southern latitude. I seem to recall that the winters were too cold for peach trees where I lived in Southeast Vermont, right near the border with New Hampshire and Mass. Global warming may be changing that.

There are a bunch of peach orchards around here. I spoke to a fourth generation MA peach farmer briefly yesterday at the market and hope to get out to his farm next week for some you-pick peaches and tomatoes. I remember peach picking trips in CT and MA when I was a kid.

#38 porcupine

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 10:49 AM

Twenty-plus pounds of Roma tomatoes.

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#39 jparrott

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 12:45 PM

Note to stock-makers. The meat counter at Whole Foods Fairfax sold me a 40lb case of Bell&Evans chicken backs for the princely sum of....$36. Now I happened to luck into them having one available (they usually do have smaller quantities of backs in their poultry case), but I imagine you could call ahead and order one or more such cases. Now for a double-dose of stock-making today!

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Anyway, I need f (4, 2) resolved to an integer value....


#40 porcupine

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 12:17 PM

Note to stock-makers. The meat counter at Whole Foods Fairfax sold me a 40lb case of Bell&Evans chicken backs for the princely sum of....$36. Now I happened to luck into them having one available (they usually do have smaller quantities of backs in their poultry case), but I imagine you could call ahead and order one or more such cases. Now for a double-dose of stock-making today!

Not all WF will do that for you; last time I asked in Bethesda they wouldn't take an order (they used to). The Kentlands store had about eleven pounds frozen, labelled "backs and necks", but they were necks only, which couldn't be determined until they thawed later. :P

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#41 legant

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 01:53 PM

Chicken Stew (adapted from Cook's Illustrated) with the very abled assistance of an 8 y.o. budding chef. She did 95% of the stew -- chopping, measuring, mixing, pouring -- leaving me to brown the chicken and saute the onions. Hmm... I guess that makes me her sous chef.

#42 Pat

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 04:09 PM

Lamb and split pea soup. I simmered some neck bones with vegetables and lots of rosemary in the crockpot on Friday and made stock, which went into the refrigerator. Now I'm finishing the project on the stovetop with some yellow and green split peas from Trader Joe's.

#43 Loire Lover

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 04:58 PM

Wild Boar in Red Wine.

#44 adamstr

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 06:49 PM

Baby back rib chili with sausage for extra heft. I'm pro-bean (mashed not whole) and pro-tomato.

#45 jparrott

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 07:13 PM

Oy. That sucks. Kentlands had necks? The "backs and necks" in the WF Fairfax case are always backs. Would like to be able to buy necks as well...

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Anyway, I need f (4, 2) resolved to an integer value....


#46 Soup

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 10:52 PM

Not right now but for lunch today, made cabbage soup. Basic left over fridge cleaning exercise. Cabbage, chicken stock and dashi stock (didn't have enough chicken stock), carrots, celery, onion bunch of seasoning, left over ham bits and bunch of other veggies that were on it last days in the fridge. At the end I added some cooked orzo.

It turned out really good. Served with some afgani bread, every one really like it (except my youngest).

BTW, been having a lot of luck with cabbage lately. Give this over looked ingredient a try.

#47 DanCole42

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 12:05 PM

My pants.

Made chicken stock. I usually strain it about 10-15 times. That's a lot of chances for spillage.

I smell like soup.
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#48 zoramargolis

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 12:54 PM

Last night: made ham stock with a lot of mirepoix and aromatic herbs. Chilled outside.

This morning: removed the ham bone and the solidified fat. Strained off and stored a portion of the stock. Left the mirepoix with the remaining stock in the pot. Added yellow split peas (Why yellow? that's what I had in the pantry, and I didn't want to make a trip to the store for green...)

Just added some diced ham that had been removed from the bone prior to stock-making.

#49 mdt

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 01:05 PM

My pants.

Made chicken stock. I usually strain it about 10-15 times. That's a lot of chances for spillage.

I smell like soup.

That seems a tad bit excessive. Is there a reason that you strain it so much?

#50 DanCole42

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 01:26 PM

That seems a tad bit excessive. Is there a reason that you strain it so much?

Top restaurants will strain upwards of twenty times. I also skim constantly.

Stocks shouldn't be cloudy or have visible particles in them!
-Dan

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