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Marian Burros on Food and Dining


treznor
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I don't care much for the first paragraph...typical New Yorker comment.
Michel Richard is one of the few Washington chefs who could be a star in New York, and his restaurant Citronelle would be a huge hit here.
:blink: She knows her audience.
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Yet another in a series of patronizing NYT articles about DC-- remember when they discovered U Street -- 10 years after the rest of the earth? Or when someone's friend described Zatinya as ""It feels like New York," as though that were the highest compliment one could bestow. Burros in particular has been scripting condescending analyses of the DC dining scene for years.

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Link to story in New York Times. "The city has warned women who are pregnant or breast feeding and children not to eat fresh tuna, Chilean sea bass, swordfish, shark, grouper and other kinds of fish it describes as "too high in mercury." (Cooking fish has no effect on the mercury level.)" Bluefin tuna is especially hazardous, yellowtail tuna and smaller fish may be better.
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Link to story in New York Times. "The city has warned women who are pregnant or breast feeding and children not to eat fresh tuna, Chilean sea bass, swordfish, shark, grouper and other kinds of fish it describes as "too high in mercury." (Cooking fish has no effect on the mercury level.)" Bluefin tuna is especially hazardous, yellowtail tuna and smaller fish may be better.

This is news? I thought it's been common knowledge for quite some time that top-of-the-food-chain seafood is very high in mercury on average. Is the NYT trying to get the city to take action on bluefin like they have on trans fats? :mellow:

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Gee I would never have known that New Yorkers think food anywhere else sucks. I found the also ran section to be quite self-serving in this regard, it was rather insolent in tone and far too short on details to be of any use other than reinforcing how horrible a food town we are that she can simply dismiss two of the better restaurants with a couple of cute words (I never would have even consider Raiska for part of this list). Add to that the choice of West End and Source over say Corduroy, Oval Room, or Hook says to me that when writing this article she was far more interested in chasing big names not finding great food.

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Gee I would never have known that New Yorkers think food anywhere else sucks. I found the also ran section to be quite self-serving in this regard, it was rather insolent in tone and far too short on details to be of any use other than reinforcing how horrible a food town we are that she can simply dismiss two of the better restaurants with a couple of cute words (I never would have even consider Raiska for part of this list). Add to that the choice of West End and Source over say Corduroy, Oval Room, or Hook says to me that when writing this article she was far more interested in chasing big names not finding great food.
Honestly, I stopped reading after a few paragraphs. As a resident of both NYC and DC - the two are incomparable. It's pointless to compare a city of 8 million to a city of 600,000. Aside from that, NYC is NYC - I love some things about living here (seamlessweb, etc.). DC is DC - I love more things about living here. I realize it doesn't make for much of a story, but how about celebrating what's good and new about each place, on it's own, like today's times article did?
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Actually, there are now almost seven million in the D. C. area which I believe is the fourth largest metropolitan area in the United States.

Marian Burros once wrote for the Post. (Didn't she leave the Post for the Times? I remember a LOT of her writing from the late '70's, etc.) Now she writes (retirement or otherwise) for Politico which is where this article appeared. Sorry, but she has been overall critical of here ever since she left.

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Actually, there are now almost seven million in the D. C. area which I believe is the fourth largest metropolitan area in the United States.
I am aware of the metro DC area size. I am talking solely about the size of each city. You can hardly compare the extended metro area in DC to the five boroughs, it doesn't make any sense.
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I am aware of the metro DC area size. I am talking solely about the size of each city. You can hardly compare the extended metro area in DC to the five boroughs, it doesn't make any sense.

"...I find it is still true that only a handful of restaurants here — Restaurant Eve and The Inn at Little Washington (tied for best), CityZen and Citronelle, when Michel Richard is in residence — can compete with New York's finest."

Seems to me that the article is, in fact comparing restaurants located in the "extended metro area" with those located in New York City.

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"...I find it is still true that only a handful of restaurants here — Restaurant Eve and The Inn at Little Washington (tied for best), CityZen and Citronelle, when Michel Richard is in residence — can compete with New York's finest."

Seems to me that the article is, in fact comparing restaurants located in the "extended metro area" with those located in New York City.

One more reason to dislike the article. Part of what makes NYC is the population density - 8 million in the five boroughs and over 19 million in the metro area. That simply dwarfs the DC metro area, which explains why there are more restaurants in both New York City and the metro area. Though fewer in number, I believe that the best restaurants we have here in DC are the equal of their NYC counterparts, and their counterparts throughout the nation. There are some cuisines where a comparison can't be made - there's no Masa equivalent in DC, and there's no great ethiopian food to be had in NYC (that I have found anyway). As Stitch said, Burros looked to the big national names here first, and not much deeper. Too bad - her old paper did a great job on the DC food scene this week, I think.
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I read the piece in the print edition of the Politico which was nice and glossy as opposed to their usual newsprint - an obvious 'keepsake' edition for all the tourists.

It made me so mad that I felt compelled to write the editor - too bad they don't really offer that as an option. So I ended up emailing the same message to 10 editor-level staff listed on their website. Tim Carman reprinted my letter in his Young & Hungry blog earlier this week: http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/y...ey-love-us-not/

Long story short, I found the tone of the piece completely inappropriate when it made far more sense to actually celebrate the best of the dining scene IN THE CITY WHERE THE READER ACTUALLY IS, instead of making an utterly useless comparison.

The sole response I've received from the editors at the Politico so far? A one-liner from Managing Editor Bill Nichols: "Appreciate the note Mike and we'll certainly keep you in mind in the future."

Message completely overlooked.

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