Jump to content

Michelada


edenman
 Share

Recommended Posts

I heard the tale of this drink when I was in an airport bar in Houston months ago, and promptly forgot about it when I got on the plane back to DC. I was reminded of it last night when I saw someone salting their corona. Wikipedia cites a few different recipes, but most of them involve a bottle of beer, hot sauce, worcestershire, lime, and a salt-rimmed glass. Anybody else heard of this? Or know where I can try one (no matter how foul it sounds)?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard the tale of this drink when I was in an airport bar in Houston months ago, and promptly forgot about it when I got on the plane back to DC. I was reminded of it last night when I saw someone salting their corona. Wikipedia cites a few different recipes, but most of them involve a bottle of beer, hot sauce, worcestershire, lime, and a salt-rimmed glass. Anybody else heard of this? Or know where I can try one (no matter how foul it sounds)?
Oh Lord, this brings back memories of one of my first jobs (after being one of the first Burger Chef Hostesses in the country ;) ). Texas, at the time, had two kinds of liquor licenses: 1) beer and wine only--girls had to be at least 18 to be in or work in such a place, but could not drink any alcohol--boys had to be 21; and, 2) private clubs, which could sell hard liquor. Many places just charged a dollar to get in the door, thus making them "private" clubs. Everybody had to be 21 to work or enter such an establishment. I had a job when I was in college in the bar of a motel (the same motel, BTW, which appears in the movie Seven Days in May), where people would ask for a "Red Eye." That was tomato juice in the bottom of the glass, with beer filling up the rest. It LOOKED disgusting; but, all in all, didn't tast too bad. (Yes, I tried while underage. So sue me. The main building of the place burned down one night while I was working the night shift on the Front Desk. No, I had nothing to do with the fire aside from calling the Fire Department.)

And some of you wonder why I consider DC a Paradise compared to El Paso. :blink:

There's a reason why Corona and other such "Mexican" beers are served with salt and lime. It's to make really lame beer taste like something. That folk are adding the same stuff you would find in a Bloody Mary, with beer instead of vodka, doesn't suprise me in the least.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not foul at all. Pleasantly different. And while everyone is sucking down their shitty sparkling wine and OJ mix, you can stand outside the flock and be the rebel. I used to drink them at Oyamel when it was still in Crystal City. Haven't been to the new location yet. Perhaps it's still on the menu? (And not that you couldn't ask any bartender anywhere to make it for you. Would be curious if they make you pay up front, though. :blink: )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anybody else heard of this? Or know where I can try one (no matter how foul it sounds)?

Well, our friends at Budweiser are more than happy to help you out in your quest:

http://home.comcast.net/~nriech/No-Fkin-Way.jpg

Mmmmm.... clamato :blink:

Get thee to a Latino-oriented grocery store.

This is not a photoshopping job at all. The source is this guy on BeerAdvocate who searches the website of the gvmt agency responsible for label approvals and posts the more interesting results on a weekly basis.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Michelada is beer with (lots of) lime juice served in a salted glass like a margarita. Tecate is a good beer to use. I've seen it made with darker beers but my preference in this case is lighter beers. Michelada Cubana which is the above mentioned with a bit of Worcestershire and Tabasco or Valentina. Find a Senor Frogs and you'll find a Michelada.

I imagine the Hotel San Jose (MattBites site) made a good Michelada. They make some fine drinks there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They offer three variations on the theme at Casa Oaxaca. Quite tasty (to some).

And they have them at Guajillo, too. I didn't know what they were until I went to Mexico earlier this year. But I think they're yummy. And they don't involve the brutal slaughtering of any baby mammals.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They offer three variations on the theme at Casa Oaxaca. Quite tasty (to some).

I finally stopped by Oaxaca this past weekend and tried one. Very....interesting. Not something I would order very often, but I can see the appeal. Would definitely be interested to see how something darker fares, maybe a Negra Modelo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finally stopped by Oaxaca this past weekend and tried one. Very....interesting. Not something I would order very often, but I can see the appeal. Would definitely be interested to see how something darker fares, maybe a Negra Modelo.

I don't see it w/ a negra modelo....I make a honey blonde ale out of about 90% pilsener malt and the other 10% split between honey malt, caramunich, and carapils that I call "Mi Esposa" (occasionally the beer is the same color as my wife's hair, the fluctuations being due to a lack of consistency in the latter rather than the former)

.... and this makes a great michelada w/ a squeeze of lime, a few drops of Chalula or your choice hot sauce & a couple shakes of worcestershire, w/ the rim of the glass dipped in lime juice and a cajun spice blend called Slap Yo Mama, couple shakes of same on the rocks, just add Mi Esposa.....

but that is a fairly light colored and bodied beer...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just had my first michelada. It was weird in a good way. I liked it a lot (although the salt and spice made me thirsty, making a glass of water a must).

What are these three variations offered at Cafe Oaxaca?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finally stopped by Oaxaca this past weekend and tried one. Very....interesting. Not something I would order very often, but I can see the appeal. Would definitely be interested to see how something darker fares, maybe a Negra Modelo.

I just completed extensive research in Michaledas and can tell you that Negra Modelo is the best choice of beer when in Mexico. No tomato juice or clamato in sight. When I mentioned that up in the USA we added red stuff I got a series of "crazy Americans" looks. They are right. In one restaurant it was served with a straw.

When I asked the bartender who made my favorite version about the ingredients the language barrier got stuck at "English Sauce" until I realized she ment Worcestshire sauce, which was used as the base. There is another version where they skip the English sauce and add a lot of lemon and/or lime juice. It didn't stand up to the original.

You can also buy bottled mixes of both versions where you just add beer. Something tells me they won't be as good but you never know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just completed extensive research in Michaledas and can tell you that Negra Modelo is the best choice of beer when in Mexico. No tomato juice or clamato in sight. When I mentioned that up in the USA we added red stuff I got a series of "crazy Americans" looks. They are right. In one restaurant it was served with a straw.

I've done some reading up on the subject, and apparently the regional variations are enormous. Tomato juice or clamato are mandatory in some areas, and competely unheard of elsewhere.

OK, folks - enough talking about it. We need to see some recipes! Or maybe this calls for a bunch of potential ingredients, some empty glasses and a few willing taste-testers?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This weekend I tried Anheuser-Busch's "chelada" - beer and Clamato juice in the same can. They come in four packs of 16 ounce cans, in Bud and Bud Light. Poured over ice, and with some added embellishments (fresh lemon juice, hot sauce), this was not bad: a beer bloody mary. Definitely a bolder foray into this type of beverage as compared to Miller's Chill.

Plus, you can, like, totally offend guests who find the idea of the combination to be both frightening and disgusting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I'm sitting at the almost empty bar at Brasserie Beck, drinking a saison and waiting for the rest of my party to show up, when the bartender pulls a tasting glass of Piraat from the tap and says "try this". A few sips in, and he says, "wait up" and takes it, and squeezes something red from a plastic bottle into the glass, then adds a few drops of Tabasco sauce. "Are you making me a beer bloody mary?!" says I, and "yup" says he, "wake ya right up."

And so I learned two things: a bored bartender is a good friend, and a beer bloody mary is weird, indeed.

But Piraat is a damn fine brew on its own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...