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Fall '05 Picnic Recipe Collection


mktye
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We are gathering the recipes for the dishes brought to the DonRockwell.com Fall '05 Picnic so those who want more of that delicious food do not have to wait until the next get-together.

If you are willing to share (please! please! please!) your recipe, please either post it to this thread or send it to me via email or PM.

Next Monday(-ish), we'll attach a document to this thread with all the submitted recipes in a format that can be downloaded and printed.

Thank you!!!

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Al Dente’s Spicy Brisket

4-5 lb brisket

28 oz can of tomatoes (I used Whole Foods’ Fire Roasted for extra flavor)

½ bottle of red wine (I used a 50/50 Cab/Shiraz from Australia)

1 large onion, diced

½ cup of diced fresh peppers (I used poblanos—you’ll need to modify this depending on how hot the peppers are)

2 large dried peppers like pasilla or chipotle

Spice Mixture (approximate measurements)

3 bay leaves

tsp red pepper flakes

tblsp cumin

tblsp paprika

tsp chili powder

big pinch of cayenne, to taste

tsp dried thyme

tsp dried oregano

s&p to taste

S&P the beef, and sear both sides in a heavy pot with some oil, remove and place in a slow cooker. Add some more oil to the pot and cook the onion and peppers until softened a bit. Throw in the spice mixture and stir to coat the veggies. Deglaze with the wine and allow the alcohol to cook off. Add the can of tomatoes and dried peppers and bring it all to a simmer. Pour mixture over meat in the slow cooker (or put the beef back in if you want to use the same pot) and bring it to a slow simmer for at least 3 hours, but preferably about 5 hours. Add water or stock as necessary to keep some liquid in the pot. The beef is ready when you can shred it easily with a couple of forks. You may need to skim for fat. Serve with tortillas.

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Martian Pig Slop from Hell:

Part I:

1. One fifth of Sauza Hornitos tequila, place in freezer two days before expected use.

2. Put thermos bottle in freezer one day before expected use.

3. On day of expected use, put chilled tequila in chilled thermos bottle.

Part II:

Sangrita de Tomate:

4 small tomatoes. peeled and seeded

1/2 cup orange juice

3 tablesppons chopped onions

1 chile serrano

1 tab lime juice

2 tea sugar

salt and white pepper

combine in blender

Strain any solids out with fine-mesh stratiner.

Variation: 1. Substitute 2-3 Thai peppers for serano chili. 2. Forget to put in chopped onion (whoops).

Part III:

sip shotglass each of sangrita and tequila.

Part IV:

Nurse hangover.

Edited by Jacques Gastreaux
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>Evil< Martian Pig Slop from Hell:

Part III:

sip shotglass each of sangrita and tequila.

How much does that recipe make of the sangrita? Just wondering, because it ran out by mid-afternoon, after my third round, forcing me to drink the tequilla straight after that. Not that it wasn't tasty by itself.
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And here is the smoked butt details:

The pork came from the Shoppers Food Warehouse at Potomac Yard. They sell 2 kinds of pork shoulder: the butt and the picnic. I view the picnic as a lower quality product because it has the skin on it and more bone mass. The butt on the other hand seems to have more meat, less bone and comes fairly well trimmed.

I brined the butts starting Friday morning. I put a cup of regular table salt in some water in a pot on the stove and brought it to a boil, dissolving the salt in the water. I put the butts in a 12 quarter stock pot and added cold water from the tap to just about cover the butts. When the salt was dissolved in the other pot on the stove, I added it to the stock pot with the butts and slapped the lid on and shoved in onto the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.

Come Saturday morning, I drained the butts, dried them with a paper towel and hit them with liberal doses of kosher salt and fresh ground pepper. Into the smoker they went. I use a Brinkmann electric smoker and hickory (soaked). I also inserted the probe of a digital thermometer into the top butt. They went to on the smoker at about 8:30 AM and I took them off at about 7:00 PM. I had to add more wood about 3-4 times. The thermometer read 194F when I took them off. I wrapped them in foil and put them in the refrigerator.

For the sauce, I used 3 cups of cider vinegar split evenly between white and regular. I put in 2 heaping tablespoons of dried pepper flakes, 2 teaspoons of sugar, some fresh ground black pepper, a glog of Crystal pepper sauce and a tablespoon of kosher salt. Also, one cup of Heinz ketchup. Shake it up and let it set overnight.

Sunday morning, I put the butts in the oven on warm starting at about 8:00. I took them out at about noon and put them in the cooler when I needed to use the over to roast the potatoes for the roasted potato salad with black olives and red onion.

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How much does that recipe make of the sangrita?  Just wondering, because it ran out by mid-afternoon, after my third round, forcing me to drink the tequilla straight after that.  Not that it wasn't tasty by itself.

The bottle of sangrita that I brought to the picnic was a double batch.

I think now that a triple batch would make enough to go with one bottle of tequila. But I suspect that several of those who partook did not experience the full effect, making the sangrita run out before the tequila.

Also, I think it could have stood a couple of more of those Thai peppers. What do people think. And, i heard one compaint that it was too orangey, not tomatoey enough, a criticism with which I agree. When I was making it, I added a couple of more tomatoes after tasting it. I might use a couple of more tomatoes next time.

Edited to add: Now that I think about it, that call for 5 Thai peppers is what I used in the double batch, crank it down for a single batch.

Edited by Jacques Gastreaux
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The bottle of sangrita that I brought to the picnic was a double batch. 

I think now that a triple batch would make enough to go with one bottle of tequila.  But I suspect that several of those who partook did not experience the full effect, making the sangrita run out before the tequila. 

Also, I think it could have stood a couple of more of those Thai peppers.  What do people think.  And, i heard one compaint that it was too orangey, not tomatoey enough, a criticism with which I agree.  When I was making it, I added a couple of more tomatoes after tasting it.  I might use a couple of more tomatoes next time.

I thought it was great stuff. Would also function well as a new take on a Bloody Mary, a glaze for roasted meat, dipping sauce (if thickened slightly) for chicken wings, mozzarella sticks, or any other football party-type food. I even liked it on its own.

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The cornbread changes all the time for me to some extent. Particularly the liquid. Sometimes it's milk, sometimes cream, sometimes half and half. Yesterday's was half cream and half half and half. (Bonus points for using half 4 times!). Dare I say you may want to halve the recipe? I use this for my big cast iron pan. But you all saw how big the cornbread turned out.

butter or shortening (I use shortening)

2 1/2 cups stone ground corn meal

1 1/4 cups AP flour

1 cup sugar (I continue to play with this amount. It gets larger every time I cook it.)

2 TB baking powder

2 tsp. salt

2 beaten eggs

1/3 cup mayonnaise

1/2 cup oil (I use what's around and open. Canola usually, but yesterday I used EVOO because I had just opened it for the EVOO tasting).

2 cups whole milk, cream, half and half or some combination thereof (see above)

3 habanero peppers, minced. Include those seeds and ribs! Add more if you want it spicy. :P

Fresh or frozen (defrosted, natch) cut corn. Use any amount that looks good. Sometimes I've even used creamed corn.

Preheat oven to 400. I do mine with my cast iron skillet already in the oven with a spoonful of shortening in it.

In a big bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients.

In another big bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise and oil into the beaten eggs. Whisk in the milk/cream. Whisk in the habaneros and the niblets. Pour it over the dry ingredients and whisk to incorporate fully.

Pull pan from the oven (Jacques, do I need any legal stuff here to protect me regarding people who would grab a 400 degree piece of iron with their bare hands? :lol: ) Swirl that shortening around briefly. Pour in the batter. Listen to that sizzle. Yum.

Bake it for about 30-40 minutes until golden brown and delicious. Check it from time to time after 30 minutes with a toothpick.

Shove the leftover cornbread into some pork chops and cook 'em up with a flaming bourbon pan sauce! Yee haw!

Edited by CrescentFresh
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ok lets see:

adapated from "Salsa di Parmigiano" (cheese salsa) from napastyle.com

(Yield: 2+ Cups)

8 ounces Parmesan cheese

8 ounces Asiago cheese

1 tablespoon chopped garlic (i add more)

2 tablespoons chopped basil (i add more)

2 tablespoons chopped scallions (i add more)

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper (i add less)

1 tablespoon pepper flakes (i add less)

1-1/2 cups extra-virgin olive oil

Shred cheese. Chop the rest. Mix all. Refrigerate for up to a week. Bring to room temperature before serving. Serve with crackers, also good as a topping for bread, tossed with pasta, spooned over fresh sliced tomatoes etc...

Chocolate Biscuits (adapted from a martha stewart recipe (i think))

Makes 16

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup Dutch-process cocoa powder

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature

3/4 cup confectioners' sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1. Heat oven to 350°.

2. Mix all.

3. Roll 2 1/2 tablespoons of dough between the palms of your hand to form a ball. Place on baking sheet, spacing cookies 2 inches apart. Using a dinner fork, press tines into dough, and gently press into biscuit shape. Bake biscuits just until firm to the touch, 12 to 15 minutes.

n.b. dough is addictive in its raw state...

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Roasted Potato Salad with Kalamata Olives and Red Onion:

(I brought a double batch to the picnic, the recipe is for a single batch):

Potatoes:

Preheat oven to 450F

one mesh bag of small red potatoes, sliced in half

In a bowl, combine the sliced potatoes with some coarse salt, fresh ground black pepper and herbs de provence and olive oil to coat.

Arrange the potatoes cut side down on a baking sheet and bake for 30 minutes. Remove and let cool for a few minutes,

Dressing:

3/4 T mayonaisse

1 1/2 T rice wine vinegar

fresh ground black pepper

coarse salt

1/2 clove garlic minced

3 T olive oil

Combine all of the ingredients except the olive olive, then whisk in the olive oil a little at a time to make an emulsion. This can be made ahead of time, while the potatoes are cooking.

Coarsely chop about a cup of kalamata olives and thinnly slice 1/4 of a red onion

Toss the still warm potatoes with the dressing and the olives and onions.

Voila.

But wait: I didn't use mayonaisse in mine, I used coarse grained mustard instead. And I put the garlic through the press.

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The Chocolate Sparklers were from Chocolate Desserts by Pierre Herme and Dorie Greenspan.  Of course I would never post the copyrighted recipe but if you should happen to look elsewhere you might find someone without my scruples has reproduced it.

Way off topic, but the application of coyright law to recipes is a little tricky. The list of ingredients clearly is not protected. It's when you get to the description of how you put it together that it gets tricky. If the description rises to the level of a work of authorship, then that part of the recipe will be protected. A mere statement such as "combine all of the ingredients and bake at 350F for one hour," probably would not be protected. Operators of websites such as this should shy away from allowing the posting of recipes that clearly came from someone's published cookbook. However, it should be OK if it is clear that the poster of the recipe put the "method" into his or her own words.

Edited by Jacques Gastreaux
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The Mango Mold Recipe

Spray (grease) a medium/large ring mold and set aside.

Puree:

30 oz. can of Mango puree

8 oz. softened cream cheese

In a separate bowl, combine 3 packets of lemon flavored Jell-O and 2 packets of Knox plain gelatin with 2 cups boiling water. Blend til slightly syrupy.

Combine jello mixture with mango/cream cheese blend...pour slowly into mold and place in the refrigerator until set.

Presentation: Remove from mold and garnish with fresh berries.

** If you don't have a mold, pour the mixture into individual ramicans.**

Edited by MelGold
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Also, still waiting for recipes for the Cincinnati chili and the mango jello mold.

And I've received specific requests for Zora's guacamole recipe, shogun's four trite-toppings (especially the pesto) recipes, and the chocolate chunk bundt cake recipe.

And what about the sate, mdt's surprise meat, the homemade ranch-style dip, the green bean salad, the carrot salad, the applesauce, Nadya's tomato/blue cheese/bacon appetizer, the "improved" sugar cookies, and all the rest of the cakes?!?

Don't force me to start nagging you all via PM... :lol:

Edited by mktye
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A Study On The Triteness of Miniburgers with Four Equally Played-Out Toppings:

The Meat: Equal parts sirloin, chuck, and lamb, ground and well salted.

The Toppings:

"Chipotles Add Smokey Heat To Just About Everything" Salsa

3 tomatoes, seeded and diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 bell pepper, diced

1 Tbps olive oil

1/2 red onion, diced

Parsley (Or...Cilantro...if you must), chopped

2+ canned chipotle peppers in adobo

Salt, pepper

Chop everything and put it in a bowl with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper, and add a spoonfull or so of the adobo from the chipotle can. Go easy on it and taste...chipotle was hotter than I expected in can form.

_________________________________________________________________________

Basil is so over in pesto

(Adapted from Alton Brown)

1 clove garlic

Good bunch of:

thyme

tarragon

sage

oregano

Lots of parsley

1/2 grated parmesan cheese

3/4 cup almonds

Chop that all in a blender until it looks pretty well and truely chopped, but not all the way because you need to blend in:

2/3 cup olive oil

______________________________________________________________________

Inexplicable tropical fruit topping for meat, with some booze thrown in

1 mango: peeled, seeded, and diced

2 green onions, sliced thinly

1/2 red bell pepper, demembraned and diced

Juice of 1 lime

1 jalepeno, seeded and de-membraned

1/4 red onion, diced

Good splash++ of tequila. Whatever you've got. I used Milagro Anejo for it's delicious properties. Or not, if you prefer.

Salt and pepper.

Incidentally, I also used some Alize passionfruit-cognac because I wanted some passionfruit in there too, but couldn't find one. I don't think you could taste it.

Chop everything and stir in a bowl with the oil and tequila, and season. Let sit and mascerate a while.

______________________________________________________________________

Essentially Gimmick-Free Blue Cheese Mayo

One recipe worth of mayo (or about three cups of pre-made), meet a good chunk of blue cheese. I made the mayo using a recipe I got from myke, which I don't know if I can reproduce but it was pretty easy, and some largely inoffensive but not bad either Bleu d'Auvergne that I've forgotten the name of. This was going to have caramelized leeks in it, but I ran out of time and in the end I think it was pretty good without.

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Green Bean "Salad"

adapted from Chesapeake Bay Cooking, by John Shields

2 lbs fresh green beans

1 stick plus 6 T unsalted butter

2 t dijon mustard (have to check this when I get home)

Juice of 2 lemons

8 oz Smithfield ham, jullienned or cut in small pieces

1-1/2 c unsalted peanuts (roasted or raw)

salt & pepper

Break or snip the stem ends off of the green beans, but leave them whole. Drop in boiling salted water for about 5 minutes, till cooked but still crisp. Drain, toss in large bowl with 1 stick of butter, mustard, and lemon juice. Toss in the ham.

Melt the 6 T of butter in a skillet, and saute the peanuts until warmed. Drain in a strainer to remove excess butter.

Arrange bean mixture on a platter and scatter the peanuts strategically (Shields likes them in a line down the center, but I didn't do that for the picnic).

Serve lukewarm or room temp.

This is one of my favorite ways to use the packages of Smithfield ham that my darling Father-in-law loves to send us (he lives in Colorado, but misses Virginia, where he grew up).

Enjoy!

ScotteeM

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Green Bean "Salad"

adapted from Chesapeake Bay Cooking, by John Shields

2 lbs fresh green beans

1 stick plus 6 T unsalted butter

2 t dijon mustard (have to check this when I get home)

Juice of 2 lemons

8 oz Smithfield ham, jullienned or cut in small pieces

1-1/2 c unsalted peanuts (roasted or raw)

salt & pepper

Break or snip the stem ends off of the green beans, but leave them whole.  Drop in boiling salted water for about 5 minutes, till cooked but still crisp. Drain, toss in large bowl with 1 stick of butter, mustard, and lemon juice. Toss in the ham.

Melt the 6 T of butter in a skillet, and saute the peanuts until warmed. Drain in a strainer to remove excess butter.

Arrange bean mixture on a platter and scatter the peanuts strategically (Shields likes them in a line down the center, but I didn't do that for the picnic).

Serve lukewarm or room temp.

This is one of my favorite ways to use the packages of Smithfield ham that my darling Father-in-law loves to send us (he lives in Colorado, but misses Virginia, where he grew up).

Enjoy!

ScotteeM

I can attest that these reheat wonderfully by wrapping in aluminum foil and sticking the oven for a few minutes. Thanks, Scottee!

Edited by Barbara
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And I've received specific requests for Zora's guacamole recipe, shogun's four trite-toppings (especially the pesto) recipes, and the chocolate chunk bundt cake recipe. 

And what about ...the carrot salad...

Don't force me to start nagging you all via PM...  :lol:

Poor mktye WAS forced to nag my by PM - but at least it worked! :P

Here's the Chocolate Zucchini Cake recipe which, to make this a triple credit, I got from Kim O'Donnell's What's Cooking WashPost.com online discussion, and she credited it as follows:

Adapted from Mimi Montano's Chocolate zucchini cake

from Death by Chocolate Cakes by Marcel Desaulniers

I use extra virgin olive oil** with great results here. If you don't like the flavor, vegetable oil is fine. Also have used carrots in place of zucchini,adding a little ground ginger as well.

Preheat oven to 325. Coat with soft butter a nonstick angel food cake pan or a bundt pan.

Combine 3 cups flour, 2 tsp. ground cinnamon, 1 1/2 tsp. baking powder, 1 tsp.

baking soda and 1 tsp. salt.

Grate 1 large zuke with food processor or box grater. Set aside

Place 1 1/2 cups sugar and 4 eggs in bowl of electric mixer. beat on medium-high

for about 2 minutes, until light in color and thickened. Then use rubber spatula

to scrape down sides. Gradually add 1 1/2 cups olive oil in a steady stream

while mixing...continue to mix until batter is yellow in color and thick, about

1 1/2 minutes...Melt 3 oz unsweetened baking chocolate and add to bowl, mix in.

Then add dry ingredients (I find mixing with spatula over machine works better

at this point)...Then add grated zucchini, mix til incorporated. Add 2 cups

semisweet chocolate chips...Transfer batter to prepared pan, spread evenly.

Bake til skewer comes out clean, about 1 hour.

** I used Sasso EVOO, which was #5 in the tasting. I haven't tried the carrot variation but it sounds pretty good too....

and speaking of CARROTs, here's the recipe for

Morroccan Carrot Salad- adapted from the 4 Ingredient Recipes cookbook

3-4 carrots

1/4 tsp cumin, or more to taste

4 Tbsp Garlic flavored vinaigrette

2-3 Tbsp Cilantro or flat-leaf parsley (or combination), chopped coarsely

Slice carrots thinly (Cuisinart is great for this) and steam, until lightly cooked, but still crunchy. Drain and set aside to cool and dry.

I usually make my own vinaigrette, so it varies, but I suppose you can use a store-bought dressing if you like. For the picnic, I smashed 2 cloves of garlic and threw it in a jar with white balsamic vinaigrette, EVOO, and salt and pepper. I did this the day before I made the salad.

Add cumin, vinaigrette, and cilantro to carrots, and toss together until mixed. Chill well and serve. If needed, add more salt, pepper, and/or cumin before serving.

Serves about 4. (I more than doubled this for the picnic - used about 8 carrots, 2/3 cup dressing, 1 tsp and a dash of cumin, and about 2/3 cup of cilantro)

Edited by goldenticket
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And I've received specific requests for Zora's guacamole recipe...

Don't force me to start nagging you all via PM...  :lol:

I did send this to Mktye via PM, after a direct nag. I actually thought the avocados I had in house that day weren't all that great--lacking in flavor and a bit "watery." They were Hass variety, but they were from Chile, and I think they suffered from insufficient hangtime on the tree. So, it wasn't the best guacamole I've ever made, but the method obviously provides enjoyable guacamole even with suboptimal avocados if there were requests for the recipe.

Edited by zoramargolis
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The pulled pork recipe is the same process as JG used, but I used skin on shoulder. According to some resources that I read, skin on shoulders are a great cut for smoking. Anyway, no need to reiterate the smoking process here.

Tacos de Lengua (Beef tongue )

1 beef tongue (around 3 lbs.)

1 onion

1 T cumin seeds

1/2 head of garlic

2 bay leaves

1 tsp. peppercorns

salt

- Wash tongue, using coarse salt as an abrasive.

- Place tongue, onion, cumin, garlic, bay leaves, peppercorns, and salt in a pot.

- Cover with water and bring to a boil and simmer uncovered for about 3 hours.

- Remove tongue and allow to cool.

- Peel outer covering from the tongue and trim away any gristle.

- Cut meat into bite size pieces.

Meat from tongue cooked above

1 onion cut into fine dice

Toasted cumin seed (ground)

Salt

Pepper

- Heat oil in a skillet on med-high heat

- Sauté onions until slightly golden and add meat

- Season with cumin, salt, and pepper to taste.

- Cook for about 3-5 minutes to allow meat to heat through.

- Place meat on a heated tortilla and top with salsa and/or hot sauce of choice.

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Al Dente’s Spicy Brisket

4-5 lb brisket

28 oz can of tomatoes (I used Whole Foods’ Fire Roasted for extra flavor)

½ bottle of red wine (I used a 50/50 Cab/Shiraz from Australia)

1 large onion, diced

½ cup of diced fresh peppers (I used poblanos—you’ll need to modify this depending on how hot the peppers are)

2 large dried peppers like pasilla or chipotle

Spice Mixture (approximate measurements)

3 bay leaves

tsp red pepper flakes

tblsp cumin

tblsp paprika

tsp chili powder

big pinch of cayenne, to taste

tsp dried thyme

tsp dried oregano

s&p to taste

S&P the beef, and sear both sides in a heavy pot with some oil, remove and place in a slow cooker. Add some more oil to the pot and cook the onion and peppers until softened a bit. Throw in the spice mixture and stir to coat the veggies. Deglaze with the wine and allow the alcohol to cook off. Add the can of tomatoes and dried peppers and bring it all to a simmer. Pour mixture over meat in the slow cooker (or put the beef back in if you want to use the same pot) and bring it to a slow simmer for at least 3 hours, but preferably about 5 hours. Add water or stock as necessary to keep some liquid in the pot. The beef is ready when you can shred it easily with a couple of forks. You may need to skim for fat. Serve with tortillas.

My Government Cog wife put this meal together for us yesterday as I was slaving away in my office. We used a 3 pound brisket and man, was that good. I served it with corn tortillas, salsas, and some sort of vegetable.

The only difference is we used the oven to slow cook it at 350 for 5 hours.

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Cincinnati-style Turkey Chili

Thanks to all of those who enjoyed this chili, and apologies for taking so long to post the recipe.

Disclaimers: I was born in Cincinnati, but never have eaten chili there. Also, I never make this quite the same way twice. Your mileage may vary. Void where prohibited. Some restrictions may apply. The following is for entertainment purposes only.

Note: I would like to try this with ground beef and veal stock sometime. But this is the turkey version that I brought to the picnic.

Bring one quart chicken stock to a boil in a large pot.

Add two to three pounds raw ground turkey (I used on package breast meat, one package dark meat, both on sale), a large chopped yellow onion, and a bulb of chopped garlic. Yes, you are boiling the meat. Don't even think about browning anything.

Lower heat to bring liquid to a simmer; break up the meat chunks. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Add 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar and one tablespoon Worcestershire sauce. Toss in a dried bay leaf. Stir.

Add a spice mixture comprising one tsp ground black pepper, one tsp ground allspice, one tsp ground cloves, one tsp ground cumin, one teaspoon ancho chili powder, and two teaspoons ground cinnamon. Stir.

Add about 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, more or less depending on how much heat you want. Stir.

When meat is thoroughly cooked, add one 15-oz can of tomato sauce. Stir. Simmer for at least 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Add the secret ingredient, one oz of unsweetened chocolate. Stir until the chocolate melts and is fully incorporated.

Remove from heat and refrigerate overnight. Reheat until piping hot before serving.

For the full Cincy experience (versus the plain chili I brought to the Rocks picnic), serve with oyster crackers and any of the following:

Over cooked spaghetti ("two way")

Over cooked spaghetti, add grated cheese ("three way")

Over cooked spaghetti, add grated cheese, and raw chopped onion ("four way")

Over cooked spaghetti, add grated cheese, raw chopped onion, and red kidney beans ("five way")

Anne likes hers with grated Tibetan yak cheese. :-D

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Walrus and Tripewriter's Picnic Cupcakes

Go to Pastries by Randolph on Lee Hwy in Arlington.

Take a number.

When your number is called, select an assortment of cupcakes, such as yellow and chocolate with white buttercream frosting and pumpkin spice with cream cheese frosting.

While counter staff box cupcakes, order two more with milk to eat in the store.

Settle up at the register and take box of cupcakes to picnic.

Enjoy one before they're all devoured, even if you've just consumed two pounds of smoked pig. Goes well with a fine single malt.

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Ranch dressing:

Mix equal parts sour cream and good quality mayo, add buttermilk to achieve the desired consistency (thicker for dip, thinner for salad dressing). Add salt and pepper to taste. Mix in minced chives and dill - scallions can be substituted if chives are unavailable.

Base dressing can accomodate numerous variations: minced jalapenos, a little minced canned chipotle, cilantro rather than dill, Parmesan and parsley, crumbled blue cheese, crisp crumbled bacon...

If you want to get really fancy use creme fraiche and homemade mayo. :lol:

Edited by Heather
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Vanilla Applesauce

Peel, core, and slice apples (we have a gizmo that does this). The smaller you chop, the smoother the final sauce will be. We like it kinda chunky.

Place in heavy stockpot

Add water until level is 1/2 to 3/4 of way covering apples. Do not completely cover apples.

Bring water to simmer.

Add sugar and vanilla to taste - you can keep adding and tasting through cooking cycle.

Cook for about 20 minutes, until desired consistency is reached. DO NOT OVERCOOK.

Chill and serve

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Ben Nevis

1) Fly to Scotland for vacation.

2) Drive to Fort William, on the south side of Loch Ness. Remember to stay on wrong side of road.

3) Find distillery that allows children on tour. Read children riot act about behaving on tour.

4) Take tour, breathing in heavenly aromas. End up in tasting room, and hear that 10-year highland malt just won "Best of Scotland".

5) Purchase bottle for ridiculously low price.

6) Place in suitcase, so 2 more bottles can be purchased at duty-free. :lol:

7) Fly home, remember to revert to proper side of road.

8) Bring bottle to picnic to share, become hero. :P

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A big "Thank You" to everyone for posting (and/or sending in) your recipes. We currently have the recipes for all but a few of the dishes from the picnic and are starting to work on putting them together in an easily downloadable/printable format. Your willingness to share your recipes and taking the time to type them out is much appreciated.

(And to you folk who know who you are: don't worry, it is still not too late to submit your recipes! :lol: )

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An update on the status of the recipe collection:

I’ve gone through all of the recipes submitted, changed a few things for clarity and standardized the abbreviations and such (editing the recipes as a little as possible). I PM'd everyone this afternoon with a version of their recipe as it will appear in the final compilation. If there are no changes, we'll get to work on beautifying the package (including a nice cover, courtesy of crackers) and hope to have it ready for you all soon.

(If you submitted a recipe and did not hear from me today, please let me know. Thanks!)

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Will it feature a ventworm swallowing a smoked pig basted by flaming martians?

Hmm, we just might have to rethink the cover... :lol:

We now have the recipes put together in an aesthetically pleasing format and are just working on turning it from a hefty-sized word document into a managable .pdf file. Hope to have it up on this thread soon!

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