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Fast Food Ads vs Reality


Meaghan
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Hmmm...that brought me right back to third grade, where the lunchroom sport was to watch the boys compete to see who could consume an entire large candy bar in a single bite. Not exactly the kind of nostalgia I'd imagine advertisers are going for.

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Recently I read an article(I cant remember where or seem to track it down for that matter) where either the CEO or Chief Marketing Officer said that Burger King was embracing the gluttony of fast food while other chains were moving away from it.

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Recently I read an article(I cant remember where or seem to track it down for that matter) where either the CEO or Chief Marketing Officer said that Burger King was embracing the gluttony of fast food while other chains were moving away from it.
In this vein, there was a WSJ page one feature back in 2000 with the following title: "Cash Cows: Burger Joints Call Them 'Heavy Users' -- but Not to Their Faces." I can't link to it because it has to be purchased indivdually, but the title speaks volumes, even if the content of the article is a touch dated.
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Recently I read an article(I cant remember where or seem to track it down for that matter) where either the CEO or Chief Marketing Officer said that Burger King was embracing the gluttony of fast food while other chains were moving away from it.
I remember this article (or one like it)-- it was interesting. The gist was that attempts at making healthier food at fast-food joints don't do well. People say they want healthier food (which is why fast-food places keep attempting it), but when they get to the counter, they rarely order it. BK did some analyses that found that most of their customers were "heavy users" who didn't care about health (almost by definition) and wanted even bigger portions.
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Recently I read an article(I cant remember where or seem to track it down for that matter) where either the CEO or Chief Marketing Officer said that Burger King was embracing the gluttony of fast food while other chains were moving away from it.
What, like Hardee's, with the Monster Thickburger, which has 45 grams of saturated fat, 2740 milligrams of sodium, and 1410 calories? Almost endearingly, Hardee's divulges this on their own Website.
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What, like Hardee's, with the Monster Thickburger, which has 45 grams of saturated fat, 2740 milligrams of sodium, and 1410 calories? Almost endearingly, Hardee's divulges this on their own Website.

Was it BK that recently pushed the "Meatnormous"? That is a fantastic name for a burger. Wasn't it also shown that with their dressings some of McD's "healthly" salad alternatives were just as bad as the normal fare?

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Quite possibly the scarest moment I've ever had at a fastfood restaurant was the McDonald's by the Baltimore Travel Plaza (which in itself is scary enough).

This very overweight man and a woman (who was so nasty I couldn't tell if it was his wife or mother) were eating next to us. The woman grabbed for some of his fries and he slapped her hand away and growled at her. Like gutteral animalistic growl. My friend and I looked at each other and were like, did he really just growl at her. Needless to say we quickly finished our meal and left...never to return.

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This isn't technically fast food as commonly understood, but I've been horrified to see the same ad twice today on the Food Network. Del Monte is advertising canned peaches by pointing out that fresh fruit may go bad and have to be thrown out, which is wasteful. My mouth is still agape. The nerve? :D:blink::lol:

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This isn't technically fast food as commonly understood, but I've been horrified to see the same ad twice today on the Food Network. Del Monte is advertising canned peaches by pointing out that fresh fruit may go bad and have to be thrown out, which is wasteful. My mouth is still agape. The nerve? :D:blink::lol:

Interesting. Last Fall, I bought a jar of Toigo's jarred peaches in Bourbon, not knowing what I would do with it. Then, in February, I went to a pot-luck and took those, drained with mascapone cheese sweetened with the juice piped into each peach half and with crumbled amaretti cookies on top. The peaches in no way resembled the canned ones from Dole. They cost a whole lot more . . . . but you wouldn't take a box of Franzia wine to offer to these people, either. :P

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This isn't technically fast food as commonly understood, but I've been horrified to see the same ad twice today on the Food Network. Del Monte is advertising canned peaches by pointing out that fresh fruit may go bad and have to be thrown out, which is wasteful. My mouth is still agape. The nerve? :D:blink::lol:

I saw the ad a few times and said to myself "good point". Didn't really both me and actually a good reminder considering how much fruit I often throw out that has gone bad.

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I saw the ad a few times and said to myself "good point". Didn't really both me and actually a good reminder considering how much fruit I often throw out that has gone bad.

Even the canned "lite" fruit has a fair amount of added sugar, making it a better bet to buy fresh fruit but fairly often or to just cut bad parts off aging fruit and eat the rest.

I usually keep some canned fruit around "just in case" (it's a theme...) and then don't use it. I keep forgetting that my husband refuses to eat canned fruit, and I don't really like it. It's way too sweet. I never learn :lol:.

Encouraging people to substitute sweetened canned fruit on the basis that it reduces waste makes me think of one of those rules Michael Pollan has about how manufacturers co-opt reformers' arguments to sell their products.

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Even the canned "lite" fruit has a fair amount of added sugar, making it a better bet to buy fresh fruit but fairly often or to just cut bad parts off aging fruit and eat the rest.

Drain the juice, then it is as nutritious as fresh. Simple as that if sugar is an issue for you.

I eat canned fruit fairly often, particularly peaches. Primarily because I mix it up with cottage cheese for breakfast and it is cheap, convenient and I don't really like fuzzy peach skin. The pineapple is pretty good and convenient too.

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