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I'm looking for a restaurant where I can find a good pot pie - turkey, chicken, it doesn't really matter.

Any thoughts?

You know it's not fancy but I used to really like our pot pie at Cafe Deluxe. I used to ask for mine well done, cooked until the top was almost brown (otherwise it will be more golden-brown and I like mine crispy).

Quick edit: I have been gone for awhile, you should call to make sure they are serving them this winter.

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When I worked in Bethesda, my office was across the street from Brown Bag Catering, and they offered a really tasty chicken pot pie once a week as a special. That was a few years back, so I don't know if that's still the case, or if they have it at their DC locations. But as a take-out lunch, it was fantastic.

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I normally don't walk by there any more, but C.F. Folks on 19th in Dupont sometimes has chicken pot pie as a special on whatever day they highlight American cuisine (Thursdays?). Lunch only, but I'd put good money on it being hearty and delicious! They post the daily specials on the website: www.cffolksrestaurant.com

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SBC Cafe in Herndon has a chicken pot pie that's is one of the best that I've had in a while...Nice flakey crust, thick creamy but not overly salted filling, plus it's HUGE! It's on the specials menu most of the time this time of year, but not on the menu permanently.

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Dangerously Delicious Pies (1339 H St) makes a mean savory pie. Tried their SMOG (Steak Mushroom Onion Gruyere) recently and was really very pleased with it. I think they also do chicken pot pie, bbq pork, steak and chili, and a couple other savory pies.

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RIS, the new restaurant at 23rd and L, has chicken pot pie on the menu and it is pretty good. I think a problem with pot pies is that most of us got used to the mass produced Morton's pot pies and probably wouldn't know if what was being served was better. Still, the RIS version is worth a try.

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Agraria used to have a very good version, not with puff pastry, which I really don't care for, but pie crust with an upper and lower crust. I don't know if they have it on the menu not that they have revamped, but it reminded me of a very well made traditional pot pie like I would get at home.

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with an upper and lower crust.

More places need to do this. Growing up, I'd never even seen a pot pie that didn't have a bottom crust. It's the best part, too, when made right: the inside absorbs all the juices from the pot pie's contents, but the part actually in contact with the pan stays crispy and dry; it's an awesome combo of flavors and textures that makes you want to forget about the stuff inside the pot pie altogether.

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I had one of the greatest pot pies ever at Willow tonight. Unfortunately for people having a Po[t]peye Jones, it's only available as an accompaniment to the Smoked Pekin Duck Breast ($27), which came served with a "Miniature Duck Confit & Chicken 'Pot Pie,'" English Pea Mousse, and Foie Gras Sauce.

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I had one of the greatest pot pies ever at Willow tonight. Unfortunately for people having a Po[t]peye Jones, it's only available as an accompaniment to the Smoked Pekin Duck Breast ($27), which came served with a "Miniature Duck Confit & Chicken 'Pot Pie,'" English Pea Mousse, and Foie Gras Sauce.

Puff pastry? Double crust? I need more info.

I don't think I could pay $85 for a pot pie no matter how good it is... I love food, but I just don't think I can do it.

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I think I should point out that, while most people think of 'pot pie' as some kind of meat and other stuff, inside of a crusty dough that is usually baked (a meat pie more or less), the PA Dutchy types will tell you it is something ENTIRELY DIFFERENT.

PA Dutch pot pie (or bott boi) is essentially really good chicken soup, where it is mostly noodle squares that absorb 70% of the liquid and small chunks of chicken in it. It can be mediocre, but if you know how to make it or get it from people who do, it can be kind of rapturous. We made it for the first time and it was aMAZing.

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I think I should point out that, while most people think of 'pot pie' as some kind of meat and other stuff, inside of a crusty dough that is usually baked (a meat pie more or less), the PA Dutchy types will tell you it is something ENTIRELY DIFFERENT.

PA Dutch pot pie (or bott boi) is essentially really good chicken soup, where it is mostly noodle squares that absorb 70% of the liquid and small chunks of chicken in it. It can be mediocre, but if you know how to make it or get it from people who do, it can be kind of rapturous. We made it for the first time and it was aMAZing.

PA Dutchy type here....born and raised in good ol' Lackluster, PA.

You are right, the "pot pie" I knew growing up was a chicken stew with noodle-dumpling (large squares of noodle dough) which, when made "slippery" means they are dropped into the broth individually so as not to stick together.

Chicken soups and stews -- hard to tell the difference -- are the hallmark of Pennsylvania Dutch cooking. It has been joked that the five major food groups of Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine are chicken, dairy, corn, flour and sugar, and the chicken soups and stews of Lancaster County use most of these ingredients, all in one pot.

The pot pie dough in question is made from flour, eggs, water, butter and salt. It's almost like making fresh pasta, in that a mound of flour on the pastry board is indented with a well, then the eggs, water, butter and salt are added and mixed in. Knead, roll and cut into 2-inch squares about 1/8" thick.

My favorite soup in this family is chicken corn soup -- the absolute best version of which can be had at the Lampeter Fire Hall in late September at its annual festival. That this dish has not caught on in the Washington DC metropolitan area, especially when such presumptuous restaurants as "America Eats Tavern" and "Second State" are supposedly boasting of such genuine offerings, is beyond comprehension.

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My mother was a Pennsylvanian, although not "Dutch", but when I was a kid "pot pie" was Swanson and frozen, and one of the things we had for dinner when my mother didn't have time to cook. Another was Mexican TV dinners, which were also frozen, of course, and I don't remember if they were Swanson or some other frozen-dinner purveyor; they included an enchilada, a tamal(e), "Spanish" rice, and refried beans, and I actually liked them at the time, a lot more than the pot pies. My mother also made the greatest apple pie in the history of the world, but that's another story.

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