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Independent Coffee Houses


wlohmann
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After a brief hiatus, I hit the road again on Friday, this time to Filter, just off Connecticut on 20th St., NW. It's on a nice mostly-residential block and easy-to-miss if you aren't looking for it. Quite tiny--5 or 6 small tables along the wall, a cute patio in front with just a bench and one lonely chair (they've ordered more!). Good indie tunes playing not too TOO loud I had a pour-over and,since I sat and chatted with a friend for some time, was able to have an espresso before I left. Staff quite friendly, operation very efficient, quite a line had formed by 8:30. Food offerings very narrow in comparison to Big Bear, Mid-City etc No fruit or yogurt or granola etc., just breads. Both the pour over and the espresso were very nice-the pour overs come in two categories-mine was the lower and ran 2.50 for 12 oz. Espresso nicely prepared. A bit on the acidic end of scale for my taste but really just fine. Supplier is Cafe Pronto. All in all, definitely big giant step up from Sbux and Caribou quality-wise and free of attitude but a bit cramped and lacks the home-y atmosphere of a Big Bear, Sidamo or Sova.

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[The following posts have been split into separate threads:

Coffee Nature (arcturus)

Dolcezza (porcupine)

Ebeneezer's Coffeehouse (saf)

The Wydown Coffee Bar (TedE)

Mug N' Muffin (twinsdaddy)

Java Shack (daveo)

South Block (RWBooneJr)

Bump 'n' Grind (Kev29)]

Edited by DonRocks
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The "coffee trail" came to an end this morning with a nice espresso and very welcoming friendly service at Dolcezza, one of three Argentine gelato shops in the area and the only one that features artisanal coffee. In fact, I was surprised, when I arrived, to see as much space dedicated to coffee service as there was. It's quite a small place on Connecticut Ave., just above R Street, and really only a (long) stone's throw from Filter. Just a few seats in the front window then a rather large communal table with a bunch of chairs around it. Staff indicated it gets quite crowded in the evenings (a mixed "gelato and coffee" crowd- -no liquor license here). Food offerings limited- -just pastries and breads. Probably a notch less formal/serious coffee-wise down from Chinatown but my espresso was prepared with care, accompanied by a glass of water and very rich and smooth. AND my streak of hearing really good indie-pop music playing as I chatted with staff and sipped my coffee continued, with a great song, Raised by Wolves, by a departed band called Voxtrot (but I digress)! I felt a bit nostalgic as I finished my chat with the staff and drifted out onto Connecticut Avenue........I've checked off my last box, sipped my last espresso...........but will be keeping my eyes open for newcomers and will duly report to my friends at DR!

Walt

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The "coffee trail" came to an end this morning with a nice espresso and very welcoming friendly service at Dolcezza, one of three Argentine gelato shops in the area and the only one that features artisanal coffee. I felt a bit nostalgic as I finished my chat with the staff and drifted out onto Connecticut Avenue........I've checked off my last box, sipped my last espresso...........but will be keeping my eyes open for newcomers and will duly report to my friends at DR!

Pitango (Gelato from Baltimore at P & 15thNW, downtown and Reston Town Center) also serves a high-quality (if not "artisanal") espresso. Have you tried that?

And, "sipped [your] last espresso"? Huh? How can that be? Say it ain't so B)

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Thank you Walt for a personalized and focused walk-thru of "the scene." I'm really fascinated by coffee and espresso, because it's almost purely a study in technique. From my limited understanding, it's as if all the action takes place in the blending and roasting stage, and afterwards it is only a question of how much can you mess it up. I feel espresso isn't presently customizable as opposed to cocktails (unless you walk down the mocha path), and there really isn't a wide selection of beans from which to select (though Chinatown usually offers two). I've even tried to apply my cocktail slant to the espresso stage, asking for a peel of orange or lemon to accompany my shot, but the most gracious response I've heard was along the lines of "to each their own." As with most bartenders who don't like to riff during down-time, most baristas I've encountered instead pull their best shots when they're in a rhythm, with a long line of consumers watching their every move.

It's funny you mention Dolcezza, although I've never been. I've always suspected that espresso and coffee are more versatile than ordinarily recognized (or bastardized), and the new trend of expertly pulled espresso over craft gelato (the italian name escapes me) is pretty cool. At home, I'm experimenting with which liqueurs best compliment my shots. Chantal Tseng had a killer espresso cocktail last year, the Dulce y Salado. Your narrative seemed to suggest that coffeehouses vary mostly by furniture, music, and the employee attitudes, and while those are important components to an establishment, I have to believe that the product can eventually be just as a defining component.

But there are lots of different blends and roasters and producers, and DC has a growing scene. Thanks wlohmann for your perspective, I feel we have some similar tastes and so I really was living vicariously!

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Wow-wlohmann finishes his tour of all things DC coffee and this thread gets relegated to page two status under DC dining.

Two new coffee house visits for me in the past week. The first was Sidamo, which I found has its own deserved thread (good!) so I posted a review there so ktmoomau's woudn't be too lonely. She started the thread a year ago and mine was just the 2nd.

The other, which I can't imagine has its own thread (though in full disclosure I haven't checked) is a spot just around the corner from Pete's Apizza off Wisconsin in NW called "Coffee Nature." It's at 4224 Fesssenden St NW and just came under new ownership a year ago. The owners are Korean and also operate a place somewhere in Dupont that does Korean food (bulgogi, etc) but Coffee Nature has no obvious Korean items on its menu.

Nice enough location with several tables indoors and out front. Anna, one of the owners, helped me and was super nice.

To me, coffee nature isn't so much a "coffee house" like many of the other places we write about here as it is a more general value food/beverage spot. They offer a range of breakfast items, lunch sandwiches, wraps, ice cream, tea, coffee and other things I can't recall. The coffee is from Casey's Coffee. I had to look that up since I only knew that name of a similar brkfst/lunch spot in Foggy Bottom. Still not sure I have that right--would a place like that wholesale? Guess so. Coffee just okay at best though they do have a proper espresso machine.

Neighborhood spot. Nice owners. Lots of okay options with low prices. Not in the same league as a Quartermaine, Filter, Peregrine, Chinatown Coffee, Sidamo, etc, etc but then again, it's not really trying to be that.

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Just wanted to acknowledge that I ignored how intricate their craft is in my original comment, and how hard it is to deliver a consistent product with so many variables.

Indeed. Just this past week or two (at home) I've been noticing that as I grind for espresso, the coffee has more weight to it for a given volume of the same (Stumptown Hair Bender) bean.

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Had an unusual coffee house experience last week I thought worth sharing.

I was in Portland (OR) at one of the city's better (best?) coffee houses. Aside from the place truly having outstanding brew and people, three things will stay with me for quite a long time; things I don't believe we have here in DC:

1. It was one of the only times (maybe first) I've ever been asked what kind of coffee I wanted for my espresso. Evidently, they do espresso grinds to order just as the regular grinds they and many places do for drip or pour overs. I opted for a Guatemalan cap. Damn was it good.

2. The place was one of just two in the city using a vacuum/siphon system for regular brew. This runs between $6 and $9 but it was excellent--cleaner, purer taste than probably any other brewing method I've experienced. Here's a pic/explanation if you haven't heard of this before. SFO probably has one or two spots with this. Maybe we will by 2012.

3. The place, again a real candidate for PDX's best award, burned down the day after we were there. Noone hurt thankfully but WTH?

For specifics on the place and another of equal, truly kickass, quality, see the Portland thread on the travel board....where hopefully noone else has already posted on this. For any coffee obsessives, you really have to go to Portland if only for the coffee...and the food but that's a better covered story.

Quartermaine, Sidamo, Chinatown and Filter just weren't the same for me after getting back but I suppose the memories and longing will fade with time and I'll again be able to really appreciate what we have here.

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I'm really fascinated by coffee and espresso, because it's almost purely a study in technique. From my limited understanding, it's as if all the action takes place in the blending and roasting stage, and afterwards it is only a question of how much can you mess it up. I feel espresso isn't presently customizable as opposed to cocktails (unless you walk down the mocha path), and there really isn't a wide selection of beans from which to select (though Chinatown usually offers two).

Was just re-reading some of the thread. I totally agreed with the above until this past week in Portland. Fully customizeable espresso. Of course west coast is first.

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This is a kind of random request, but something crossed my mind the other day... Are there any good, independently run (or even small chain) coffee houses/shops in Montgomery County? If so, can someone recommend one in Bethesda/Kensington/Silver Spring/Rockville? Kind of amazing that I can't think of one in such a densely populated county. Thanks.

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This is a kind of random request, but something crossed my mind the other day... Are there any good, independently run (or even small chain) coffee houses/shops in Montgomery County? If so, can someone recommend one in Bethesda/Kensington/Silver Spring/Rockville? Kind of amazing that I can't think of one in such a densely populated county. Thanks.

I was just about to ask myself, although about MD in general. I live in Laurel, in PG County, but work in northern Silver Spring, but I'd take anything across the MD state line. Bonus points for the coffee being dirty hippe environmentally friendly/shade grown/fair trade/organic/etc. etc. :mellow:

I've been in a bad coffee place since returning from Australia in April. At the time, I couldn't believe it every time I would fork over $5 for a flat white, but I would happily pay to have something similar now.

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I've been in a bad coffee place since returning from Australia in April. At the time, I couldn't believe it every time I would fork over $5 for a flat white, but I would happily pay to have something similar now.

You definitely should check out Filter in Dupont Circle. Apparently the Flat White they serve is the real deal and quite popular with Australian ex-pats.

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This is a kind of random request, but something crossed my mind the other day... Are there any good, independently run (or even small chain) coffee houses/shops in Montgomery County? If so, can someone recommend one in Bethesda/Kensington/Silver Spring/Rockville? Kind of amazing that I can't think of one in such a densely populated county. Thanks.

Dolcezza off Bethesda Lane next to Redwood, serves great espresso and pourover coffee. I think they use the Hairbender roast from Stumptown, and maybe a couple Counter Culture roasts as options too. We always stop there before a show at Landmark Bethesda Row.

Website.

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You definitely should check out Filter in Dupont Circle. Apparently the Flat White they serve is the real deal and quite popular with Australian ex-pats.

Awesome, thank you. Not often in Dupont these days, but sounds like a good excuse to head down there on a Saturday (or Sunday, I can't even remember anymore?) to visit the farmers market and get a flat white.

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Awesome, thank you. Not often in Dupont these days, but sounds like a good excuse to head down there on a Saturday (or Sunday, I can't even remember anymore?) to visit the farmers market and get a flat white.

I was in Cassatt's yesterday and noticed they serve a Flat White. It will only set you back $3.50.

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This is a kind of random request, but something crossed my mind the other day... Are there any good, independently run (or even small chain) coffee houses/shops in Montgomery County? If so, can someone recommend one in Bethesda/Kensington/Silver Spring/Rockville? Kind of amazing that I can't think of one in such a densely populated county. Thanks.

I agree with the Dolcezza recc though the Dupont location is even more coffee centric than in Bethesda. Likewise, Filter is the best in NW DC. Another in Bethesda which I like even better than Dolcezza Bethesda, uses quality beans and good technique is Quartermaine. They're right on Bethesda row just 5 or 6 storefronts down Bethesda Ave from the Barnes & Noble next to the bagel shop with benches outside.

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Congratulations are in order for the folks from Peregrine and the DC branch of the new MadCap - both crews have individuals who advanced to the finals of the SERBC/Brewers Cup competition in Atlanta this weekend.

Lovin' it.

To all the independent coffee houses in the area: Please remember when you're updating your websites, that donrockwell.com is your friend - we are to restaurant journalism what you are to coffee, and we need your support just as much as you need ours.

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I'm actually writing this from a brand new independent "pop up" coffee shop that just opened up a block from me. Sunday was their official opening, but they did a soft opening all last week and I've gone about 4 times already.

The Blind Dog Cafe at Darnell's (no website, but they do have a Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blinddogcafe) is by far my new favorite place to open in the neighborhood since I moved here a year ago. Blind Dog Cafe essentially takes over Darnell's Bar during the day (if you haven't been to Darnell's, I recommend it for the experience and Darnell himself, but the drinks are generally terrible). It's located at the corner of V and Florida in what looks like a house with a chalkboard out front.

The people here are very focused on quality. A lot of the items are made in house (turkey and beef roasted in house, hazelnut syrup, housemade sodas) or sourced smartly. They're working with a bakery called Black Strap bakery that is putting out amazing things.

As far as the coffee goes, they use a Chemex to do the pour over, which takes about 4 minutes but is totally worth it. They use PT's Coffee from Kansas, and I'll admit that it's nice to have a place not serving Counter Culture.

The Washington Post is taking pictures here as I type this, so expect it to get a lot more busy very soon.

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Since Don asked, I'll start with just a list and see what others have to say. In no particular order, my favorites for a great cup are:

Baked and Wired

Filter

Peregrine Espresso

Chinatown Coffee Company

Grape + Bean

---

[bingo!]

Edited by DonRocks
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Google's a pretty good index for this purpose. Using that, I found most of the dueling threads I'd propose be combined to form a new "Great Coffee Shops" topic. Current threads, besides this one, include:

It's the Beans, Coffee, That Is

You gotta try the coffee

Coffee (from 2006 but w/ 50 posts)

Coffee with Clients in Dupont Circle (2007)

Best of 2011 (at least one declaration of best joe in this thread)

Type of Cuisine

Coffee (may be the same as the 2006 one above; this one is in shopping/cooking)

Of course, one of the challenges with a "Great Coffee Shops" topic is it'll become gargantuan and unwieldy over time. Since everyone's "great" is different, a mathematician might predict that eventually it'll include EVERY coffee shop. But good we're increasing the number of shop specific topics.

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You definitely should check out Filter in Dupont Circle. Apparently the Flat White they serve is the real deal and quite popular with Australian ex-pats.

This makes me very happy. It looks like there is a new Filter location opening up on the 1900 block of I Street? There is a sign up, although the windows are papered over. Do they do food/pastries, or just coffee?

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I like Columbia Heights Coffee at 11th and Monroe.

I *wish* I liked Columbia Heights Coffee better. The coffee is fine, but the food is really disappointing. I would go there a lot more often if I could get a good pastry or sandwich with my coffee. I fear that enough other people feel the same way so it may not be able to hang on much longer...

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Java Shack & Buzz in Arlington too.

I'm typing this from Buzz. :)

(Love the map!)

Jammin' Java and Caffe Amouri in Vienna come to mind. Also, I suggest "great atmosphere but middling coffee" might be included as long as they're single-owner shops and have some degree of character (i.e., Coffee Nature in Tenleytown probably wouldn't fit the bill). Maybe we can have darkstar (or maybe a small Coffee Committee?) assign ratings?

This is a classic example of something I know a lot about, but other people know still more - I like the idea of harnessing Member Power in subspecialties such as this - cigar shops, beer stores, cheese shops, hell for that matter Thai restaurants (or why not all restaurants? I'd be comfortable handling the restaurant ratings <--- sort of making this up as I go along).

Several people have approached me in the past about mapping capabilities, the first of whom was Nashman. I was all for it then, and I'm still all for it now.

Maybe we can come up with a standard template to apply to a whole host of topics so we don't have to go back and redo things later? I think this is going to be a very popular feature. In particular, I'm thinking of being able to click on a tag and pull up a map of everything related to that tab. Not worried about someone else stealing the idea because 1) they already have and 2) they don't have our brain power and substance is what's going to make this successful.

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I *wish* I liked Columbia Heights Coffee better. The coffee is fine, but the food is really disappointing.

I have never gotten food there. I love the coffee, but am not a breakfast person.

(Actually, I love breakfast, just not as early as I love coffee. So I am always out of there before it is time for food. Then I go to La Caprice to get food.)

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Thanks for the suggestions, and glad people like it. I made this map for my own reference; several places people have mentioned I wouldn't include because they don't meet my definition of "really good coffee". However, if people find it useful and as I find the time, I'll create another, more comprehensive version for donrockwell.com. It can be vetted or not as Don prefers. I can also open it up for collaboration (yo, darkstar, any interest?).

Another thought: links to dr.com threads in the pop-up window. And brief editorial comments (not ratings; really, what does "two star" mean anyway?).

Don, as far as cheese shops, etc, that is what I've been planning on doing. As I get them underway I'll post them. (Maybe you've seen the Farm Market map in the other forum?) Specialty food shops is on the to-do list, especially as I recently discovered that Cork Market has a tiny but excellent cheese selection.

Keep the ideas coming. As luck would have it I'm going to have a lot of down time this weekend; if there's internet access where I'm going* (big if) I'll continue the work. If not, expect more later next week.

*note for Escoffier: Nelson Ledges. "now with running water!"

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Cool!

You should certainly add Flying Fish Coffee & Tea in Mt Pleasant. Great coffee, great people, one of my favorite places to drink coffee in DC, along with Original Filter in Dupont. The staff of Flying Fish are epic - super friendly & laid back.

Flying Fish is currently using a tasty bean from Counter Culture for espresso - highly recommended.

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Is Bourbon on L Street (near 21st?) an independent coffee house?

I think the coffee is pretty good but I'm not a coffee expert. Their internet is wonky sometimes.

I've given up on Baked and Wired since they gave up their internet.

(I tend to stay 45 minutes or so but I usually need the option of working so even bad coffee with internet will trump good coffee without internet...)

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Oby Lee is a newly opened coffee house/wine bar in Arlington. The owner used to have the same type of shop on the Delaware shore but moved it all to Arlington. They have their own coffee and roast on the premises and eventually hope to put the roaster right on the dining area floor. Great lattes.

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Cameron Cafe (in the old Cameron Perks space near Ben Brenman Park, across the street from Cafe Pizzaiolo (formerly Food Matters)).

Half the old space is walled off, kindly owners, a couple couches, a four-seat bar, and a few two- and four-tops, small toddler play area in back, The Daily Roast beans for sale, free WiFi (which I'm using right now), baked goods, very much of a neighborhood feel.

Not a destination by any means (my Americano was made with Lavazza (my goodness it's high in caffeine)), but meets every criteria for inclusion, and an important coffee house for this heavily residential neighborhood - anyone living in Cameron Station who regularly frequents Starbucks deserves to ... live in a cookie-cutter Mctownsion.

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By far my favorite coffee in the Courthouse, Arlington area has been at Euro Cafe: Not a coffee house, a mini market at Wilson Blvd. and Veitch Road. But truth be told its not necessarily the coffee. Its the cocoa powder. Not chocolate powder...not anything else. Cocoa powder.

In fact...why write this? I've got to go out and get cocoa powder and bring it back home.

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Apologies have been slow to respond to this. I'm happy to help however but would have to be very minimal time in the near term. I like the map too but personally less likely to use it just because I have all my favorites permanently marked in my brain in a way that most others would probably find odd. Vetting's tough since the exercise is pretty subjective. That said, I did write a couple of longer posts on one of the coffee threads a few months ago with thoughts about that very topic of assessing coffee houses.

Anyway, a few quick reactions based only on a 2 minute look at the map:

- think you're missing the Dupont location of Dolcezza. Of the three Dolcezzas, Dupont has the most extensive coffee program. G'Town is just espresso. Bethesda does pourovers with 3-4 rotating varieties but devotes more square footage to gelato than to coffee. All very worthwhile though.

- not sure why Amouri is marked as "unvetted" but I'd recommend it (and have on that thread). they roast onsite and, while that doesn't guarantee anything, the investment often indicates an owner more serious about the product and thus more successful in producing excellent coffee (Joel same deal at Qualia though Qualia is probably the most serious onsite roasting shop in the area).

- also missing Quartermaine in Bethesda. Quartermaine's best days are behind it and I'd always recommend someone in search of good coffee in that area pass by Quartmaine and walk the one block to Dolcezza. But, IMHO but it should be included just because it pre-dates most of the others, has a definite focus on coffee and has many followers. They also have a second location up Rockville way.

- Coffy Cafe in Columbia Heights is newer. I'll create a thread soon if noone else does. They use Ceremony, the newly crowned Annapolis-based, most successful (in terms of distribution and national brand awareness anyway) local roaster.

- In Alexandria, have to add both Mishas, which has been the top of the totem pole there for a long time (they roast onsite also) and Society Fair, which has a serious and very worthwhile coffee program with ceremony, intelligentsia and maybe even Qualia soon (?) available.

- Juan Valdez at 19th and F NW down by World Bank should be on the map. Far from the best in town but decent and worthwhile if in that immediate area. Interesting inasmuch the exclusive Columbia sourcing. And no better spot in town to have an espresso and listen to more than 5 languages from all continents being spoken simultaneously.

One more thing. Maybe the map would be even more useful if the pins could be numbered or lettered to make matching left nav column to the map easier? Not sure how to do that but probably not too tough to figure out.

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This is a great list, and a great symbol of the state of good coffee and good coffee shops. What does it say about my addiction that I will be driving across town just to try some of these places? There are worse vices, I suppose.

I may have missed it upthread, but what constitutes vetted? Can I vouch for the Java Shack? In many ways, the original independent, at least in Arlington. Coffee comes primarily from Lexington Roasters in Lexington, VA, a mom and pop shop dedicated to good coffee. We use them at Eventide as well. They just got a new machine, and I have always been satisfied with the product.

As an aside, a very extensive selection of gluten-free baked goods. Wi-fi is free, but there are some time limitations (which I wholeheartedly support).

Does vetted have to be unbiased? I certainly can't claim that...

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This is a great list, and a great symbol of the state of good coffee and good coffee shops. What does it say about my addiction that I will be driving across town just to try some of these places? [snip]

Well, it of course says you're a very wise individual of sincere and substantive character. ;)

I may have missed it upthread, but what constitutes vetted? Can I vouch for the Java Shack? In many ways, the original independent, at least in Arlington. Coffee comes primarily from Lexington Roasters in Lexington, VA, a mom and pop shop dedicated to good coffee. We use them at Eventide as well. They just got a new machine, and I have always been satisfied with the product.

Does vetted have to be unbiased? I certainly can't claim that...

Not sure what porcupine, don or others would say on the vetting question but I'm interested in that also. Clearly this is subjective as with any restaurant or food service establishment. So, by all means very cool on the Java Shack recc. I don't know that one and will try it thanks to you. All that said, I think part of the great value of this website is that such a large percentage of regular posters support their opinions so thoroughly and persuasively. So, while a the end of the day, it's all in the eye of the beholder, there maybe are some ways to put some rigor and substance behind any reccs to make them more reliable and useful for the greatest number of people. Any opinion is inherently biased but a well supported opinion is a wonderful thing. I tried to take a whack at something more criteria-based for coffee shops with this thread though not sure how successful.

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About vetting and such... When I decided to turn my personal Really Great Coffee map into the public Independent Coffee Houses map, I was broadening the scope way beyond my personal experience. Though I'm happy to add stores for the sake of thoroughness, there are some out there I don't care for (Misha's, for example), but seem to be well-regarded by more than a few other people. There are others, though, that I've never heard of, and the recommendation is vague.

There are people on dr.com who I consider good personal friends: I've dined with them, I know their tastes, and all they need to write is "FooBarBaz Beans brews the best joe I've ever had", and that's good enough for me. Likewise, there's a large number of people who I don't know well but have dined with, whose opinion I would trust. And there are people whom I've never met, like darkstar965, who write well: intelligent, thorough descriptions, displaying some background knowledge that goes deeper than just what they like and don't like. I'd add anything those people recommend.

But what to do with a recommendation that comes from RandomUser69, whose 16 previous posts have said either "it's good, not great", or "I really like it"? That's meaningless if I don't know them, so I'm including their suggestions with the notation "not vetted". As soon as someone I know or who writes well comes back with more detail, I'll replace "not vetted" with a short description.

So, if you want to recommend a place, tell us why: who roasts the beans? do they focus on dark roasts or light? single origin, fair-trade, organic: is there a clear ethos? Baristas who know what they're doing? Or if you don't pay attention to such details, at least say why you like it: is it the vibe? or internet access? or good snacks? or that they're open at 0530 and always cheery? Give us some detail.

Like darkstar wrote, "a well supported opinion is a wonderful thing".

But even if you can't give detail, let us know anyway. "[Coffee Shop] just opened on [street and neighborhood], I like it but can't tell you more" is still good information for others to start with. I'll put it on the map and add detail as I get it.

Some days I'm busy, others not as much. As I have time I'll add your recommendations, but it might take a few days.

Nick Freshman, I'm with you: I'm going to be driving across town trying some of these places. ;) As time allows.

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- Coffy Cafe in Columbia Heights is newer. I'll create a thread soon if noone else does. They use Ceremony, the newly crowned Annapolis-based, most successful (in terms of distribution and national brand awareness anyway) local roaster.

One more thing. Maybe the map would be even more useful if the pins could be numbered or lettered to make matching left nav column to the map easier? Not sure how to do that but probably not too tough to figure out.

Coffy Cafe doesn't show up on the google; do you have an address?

You can click on the name in the left column and the info will come up at the marker on the map.

Updated

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Coffy Cafe doesn't show up on the google; do you have an address?

You can click on the name in the left column and the info will come up at the marker on the map.

Updated

Coffy Cafe is at 3310 14th St NW.

On the vetting topic, lots of thoughts there but think it depends on the overriding objective, potential utility and the resources (principally time) that would be defined or available. Suffice to say, free technology could make the map much more functionally robust but that would take knowledge and time and I haven't a clue how many people would care. For example, some of the "unvetted" places are vetted inasmuch as topics exist for them already on this website. Caffe Amouri in Vienna being a good case in point. But to most easily figure all those out, the best way is a google search with "name of shop" and "donrockwell" as the search terms.

That type of search and location-based functionality is the edge that relatively vapid sites like yelp have over dr.com. A map helps find good restaurants or coffee spots but it's subordinate to a good search engine. The invision search on which dr.com is built isn't very good. So one can go to yelp, find whatever they're looking for easily (with a cool map right there) and then be rolling the dice on the actual recc content since it's not reliable with lots of random bozos doing the writing. Someday, Don (or someone like him) will figure out how to marry great content with great tech to maximize utility and appeal. Maybe if Don gets his deep-pocketed VC on board. Needs to be a food version of Steve Jobs. Someone who REALLY gets food/beverage, writing, technology and has boatloads of cash. FWIW.

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