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Shophouse Southeast Asian Kitchen, Quick-Serve Rice Bowl Chain From Chipotle Grill


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Understood from the news this morning that Shophouse opened in Dupont today. Did any of our intrepid members make it to opening day?

I went today, picked up a few things for a group. It is even less "authentically" the cuisine of any particular country or group than Chipotle is, and the people who are bothered by that sort of thing will be very bothered. But if you don't mind that, the food was pretty tasty. I got what they call the "banh mi," with tofu. The tofu, which is closer to a scramble than to big chunks, has something close to a Malaysian curry flavor (in my non-expert opinion). They add a sort of slaw, and some cilantro, and some crushed peanuts. The bread is fine, for fast-food sub roll bread. So it's a good sandwich, again leaving aside arguments about whether it's a banh mi. Bowls are made with your choice of brown rice, white rice, or cold rice noodles. Then you add your choice of a meat or tofu, your choice of a vegetable (chinese brocolli, long beans (which may or may not be actually long beans as contrasted with regular green beans, I don't know), etc.), your choice of sauce (a couple of different curries or a tamarind vinaigrette), etc. Perfectly tasty, and spicier than I would have guessed the mass market was ready for. Everything costs somewhere around seven dollars.

Bottom line - significantly better, in my view, than what you would get at some rice-bowl sort of place in your average food court. Perfectly nice.

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Thanks for the posts...I hadn't heard word one about this place, but after reading your bit I went down there for lunch today.

And wow...that was surprisingly good!

It was just me, so I can't give you much of an overview, but I really liked my meal.

I got the steak with brown rice, Chinese broccoli, long beans, and green papaya slaw, topped with red curry sauce, chopped peanuts and crunchy garlic.

The steak itself was impressive for a quasi fast food joint...nice thick chunks cooked medium in a good marinade. A nice combination of textures with the slaw and the crunchy toppings over the rice. They warned me that the red curry sauce was really spicy, and it actually was! A good, slow building tasty spice though, as opposed to a palate searing quick burn.

All in all, a great combination of flavors...I really enjoyed it, and look forward to going back to try the chicken and the meatballs. Certainly the best rice bowl type meal I've had in a while.

The line was long...it streched out the door and almost passed BGR, but it moved fast. Probably a ten minute wait once I actually hit the front door, twenty minutes total.

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I got the steak with brown rice, Chinese broccoli, long beans, and green papaya slaw, topped with red curry sauce, chopped peanuts and crunchy garlic.

The steak itself was impressive for a quasi fast food joint...nice thick chunks cooked medium in a good marinade.

I went yesterday and got the same bowl as you except noodles instead of the rice. The steak was very good. It was spicy, peppery and had a very good char. I really enjoyed it.

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Stopped in for a quick dinner Sunday night. I'll co-sign on the steak - very good flavor and tender for fast casual. GF had the meatballs and they had good flavor but were a little dry. Both the eggplant and red curry I had on my bowl were pretty tasty. We got two big bowls of food for $15. Someone in front of me got a banh mi and it looked... small for the price.

Shophouse is difficult to properly judge because the shadow of Chipotle looms large and this concept is one that, in 2011, feels more traveled. In almost every city you can find good, quality food with these flavors for around the same price point. The food here is good, and they'll certainly be successful in this location and in DC in particular, which isn't exactly overflowing with great Asian-ish options. It grades high for a single location but if I'm supposed to be looking at it with a "will this conquer the world the same way Chipotle did" scale, it's hard to think that will be the end result in the current setup.

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Shophouse is difficult to properly judge because the shadow of Chipotle looms large and this concept is one that, in 2011, feels more traveled. In almost every city you can find good, quality food with these flavors for around the same price point. The food here is good, and they'll certainly be successful in this location and in DC in particular, which isn't exactly overflowing with great Asian-ish options. It grades high for a single location but if I'm supposed to be looking at it with a "will this conquer the world the same way Chipotle did" scale, it's hard to think that will be the end result in the current setup.

I can't vouch for how "traveled" the concept seems, but I was planning to say that it was a bit too much an offshoot of the Mexican-style fast food of Chipotle, down to the corn. Those who came up w the idea for this experiment might consider ways to make the place a bit more distinctive since choices in constructing one's bowl are not all that different from what you get in line at Chipotle, except for the fact that an elimination of dairy means lower fat content. I realize that a national franchise cannot offer the diversity of the menu at Teaism and limited options make sense, but, I don't know. Soup bowls in cold weather would be nice.

The beef looked delicious and was--the other protein options did not look appealing at all, especially the meatballs late on a Sunday afternoon. I wish one could build a bowl w more than one vegetable and the first feedback here suggested that was an option. Since the place wasn't busy when I went, my wish for half portions of eggplant and long beans was honored and I am glad. The eggplant was not too spicy to consume, but the heat quickly overwhelmed the green curry sauce, both of which were really, really good. Most fast food doesn't taste this good; Nando Peri-Peri offers the closest comparison for me and the latter costs twice as much and has slipped in quality over time (minimal portions, blah sides that don't contain ingredients on menu, etc.)

During its first weeks Shophouse makes use of local, seasonal foods in ways that distinguish it from other inexpensive options in the neighborhood. I don't know if these virtues will be retained in other locations or for the long haul, but the promise is there.

I'd change the name, too. Sounds like a bargain place for home goods and hardware and puns just aren't the best source for names.

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I'd change the name, too. Sounds like a bargain place for home goods and hardware and puns just aren't the best source for names.

I'm not sure that the name is an attempt at a pun, although I suppose it could be, in the Shakespearean quibble tradition. But see the Wikipedia entry for "shophouse" and also the explanation on the restaurant's own website.

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Part of the success of Chipotle must be that it's almost impossible to make a truly "bad" burrito with the ingredients offered. While there are certainly better and more authentic options available for a good burrito, Chipotle's ingredients all offer a similar flavor profile, put into any combination, they won't clash with each other.

Last night on my first visit to Shop House, the menu puts more responsibility on the customer to not order items that won't go well together. I can't imagine that spicy steak with eggplant, the "vinaigrette" sauce, pickled vegetables and fried garlic would be a combination that would taste great... My combination of steak, brown rice, red curry, pickled vegetables, long beans was good if a bit odd (I didn't think the steak, curry and pickled veggies combo worked great together), and my SO's combo of chicken, broccoli, papaya slaw and vinaigrette sauce tasted a bit... off. Nothing was bad per se, but I wonder if one result of this "concept" location will be to at least offer "Recommended" bowls/combinations, if not tweak the ingredients to make them more "user proof" to match the success of Chiptole. I do like to experiment and try these different combos, but I imagine after a few bowls of "hmmm, thats odd" reactions, I'd give up.

Side note- last night at 6:45, there was not a single person in line.

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I think genericeric was spot on - they are in desperate need of recommended combos for the bowls, because the flavor combinations aren't as foolproof as they are at Chipotle.

They also need to make it clearer what every topping is. Chipotle can get away with it for the most part, but even they do a great job of walking you through your options at each step. I didn't get any such help here, and maybe I missed it, but I saw no signage to identify everything. That meant I had to make snap decisions while my bowl was being made.

With that said, everything individually in my bowl was pretty darn good - meatballs, green curry, jasmine rice, papaya slaw. I just wish I could have had a little bit more help in putting things together to enjoy the whole dish.

I'll probably be back to try a meatball banh mi, which requires no choices on my part, because I truly did love the meatballs.

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In case anybody from Shophouse reads this: in addition to the points above, the sauces need more variety.. For a vegetarian, or for somebody like me that has a bad relationship with coconut milk, tamarind vinaigrette is the only choice, and it doesn't work with many combinations.

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I stopped in today for brown rice, tofu, 1/2 longbeans/1/2 corn, the cilantro/basil AND papaya slaw and the garlic/rice powder with the hot red curry. Very enjoyable and QUITE hot - - pleasingly so but hotter than I would've expected from a "fast casual" place- - -the tofu (though oddly chopped up) was well-seasoned, the beans had a nice crunch to them and the herbs set everything off nicely and the slaw balanced the heat from the sauce (of which I got about a half-portion)- - -my friends complained that the portions were about 30% too small and indeed the server seemed like he was being a bit stingy but honestly the portion was fine. Between Shophouse and Roti, I think we're starting to see some quality (though admittedly chain-ish-ly generic) offerings in this category for those days when we can't venture out for the 'real thing'.

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Ilaine, why wouldn't you try this?

Joe, not that I would not try it, but I am rarely around Dupont Circle, and when I am, would rather eat someplace more special.

If they expand out to the hinterlands, yes, I will give it a try.

The idea that it's a riff on Chipotle doesn't give me warm fuzzies. My boys like Chipotle; to me, the hard walls and furnishings makes it uncomfortably loud. Noise bouncing off hard surfaces is jarring. And the food is mediocre.

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There's gluten in steak?

Not in meat but in seasonings. Not that I know what is in this particular dish but seasoning items like soy sauce, worcestershire sauce, bouillon cubes, hydrolized vegetable protein, maltodextrin, may contain gluten.

I am leery when a small local mom and pop shop says their food is gluten free because I doubt that they really know what that means.

But if a corporate restaurant, with corporate lawyers, says a food item contains gluten, I believe them.

Doesn't take much to ruin my week. And I mean week, not day.

For some, the ruining lasts much more than a week. Until you've been in our shoes, please don't knock us. I wouldn't wish it on anybody.

So thank you, Shophouse, for full disclosure.

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Joe, not that I would not try it, but I am rarely around Dupont Circle, and when I am, would rather eat someplace more special.

If they expand out to the hinterlands, yes, I will give it a try.

The idea that it's a riff on Chipotle doesn't give me warm fuzzies. My boys like Chipotle; to me, the hard walls and furnishings makes it uncomfortably loud. Noise bouncing off hard surfaces is jarring. And the food is mediocre.

That's fair, Ilaine, because we live in the hinterlands (Reston) and my first choice for Dupont circle for lunch is Kramer Books cafe which I've gone to for twenty years (?) and absolutely love. Then, there's Bistrot du Coin and...

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That's fair, Ilaine, because we live in the hinterlands (Reston) and my first choice for Dupont circle for lunch is Kramer Books cafe which I've gone to for twenty years (?) and absolutely love. Then, there's Bistrot du Coin and...

It's nice to see agreement on this thread - Shophouse Southeast Asian Kitchen is as good as it will ever be right now, and doesn't impress me as an assembly shop that will improve over time; that said, some of the suggestions laid forth here are outstanding, and I cannot imagine that they aren't taking note, given that the Washington, DC branch is essentially a test case for future expansion, and they're looking for feedback - they certain have plenty of intelligent feedback here, which makes me (nor surprisingly) very proud of the posters on this thread.

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I've been to Shophouse several times. I have a bunch of complaints but overall it fills a need. First, they don't use gloves in making the banh mi. Is that unclean? No. But it is a little weird to see someone making your food in front of you without gloves. Two, the flavors are too complicated. I just want corn as a topping. Not corn with 3 different types of spices and greens. It's okay for some toppings to be convoluted but a few could be simple. Finally, the food is just too spicy. Way too spicy. And no real information on the menu about what is and isn't spicy.

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Walked into Shophouse around 6pm tonight and about half the seats were taken with no one in line. By the time I walked out between 6:30/6:45, all seats were full and the line was about 5 deep. Definitely popular for dinner, and I can only imagine lunch is even worse.

The website does a good job explaining what exactly is in all the components of the topping options.

The vast majority of people I saw ordered bowls, and although I do want to try the Bahn Mi, I went with a bowl as well. I opted for chilled rice noodles, steak, 1/2 long beans and 1/2 eggplant (they technically only allow for one serving of vegetables, but will let you do two in half sizes), with spicy red curry, green papaya slaw, and crispy garlic. I can definitely see, as mentioned above, how some combinations might not work all that well (and that suggested combos would be a good idea), but this seemed to work well together.

The steak was probably more medium than the medium rare mentioned on the website, but it was very tender flavorful. And yes, the red curry is quite hot. At first it may not seem that bad, but it definitely builds as you continue to eat. I think I refilled my water 3 times and was blowing my nose at the end. My friend that got the green curry was even surprised at the kick in hers. The toppings I could taste were good, but they do get lost a little bit with the spice.

I definitely give Shophouse a thumbs up and I look forward to returning to try the sandwich and try the meatballs that have gotten some praise. I have no doubt it will be expanding, ala Chipotle, before too long.

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Walked into Shophouse around 6pm tonight and about half the seats were taken with no one in line. By the time I walked out between 6:30/6:45, all seats were full and the line was about 5 deep. Definitely popular for dinner, and I can only imagine lunch is even worse.

The website does a good job explaining what exactly is in all the components of the topping options.

The vast majority of people I saw ordered bowls, and although I do want to try the Bahn Mi, I went with a bowl as well. I opted for chilled rice noodles, steak, 1/2 long beans and 1/2 eggplant (they technically only allow for one service of vegetables, but will let you do two in half sizes), with spicy red curry, green papaya slaw, and crispy garlic. I can definitely see, as mentioned above, how some combinations might not work all that well (and that suggested combos would be a good idea), but this seemed to work well together.

The steak was probably more medium than the medium rare mentioned on the website, but it was very tender flavorful. And yes, the red curry is quite hot. At first it may not seem that bad, but it definitely builds as you continue to eat. I think I refilled my water 3 times and was blowing my nose at the end. My friend that got the green curry was even surprised at the kick in hers. The toppings I could taste were good, but they do get lost a little bit with the spice.

I definitely give Shophouse a thumbs up and I look forward to returning to try the sandwich and try the meatballs that have gotten some praise. I have no doubt it will be expanding, ala Chipotle, before too long.

This place reminds me of the Aberdeen Proving Ground.

I had a late lunch (maybe 2 PM?) here a couple days ago, and it was surprisingly empty; I can't imagine it's not crowded during rush. $7.50 all-in for a bowl of tofu - they've got the system down pat except for the spicing (when you're throwing awayrecycling the bowl, for example, the fork fits neatly inside before snapping the lid back down - a small, but huge, detail). At the risk of self-promotion, it's really too bad a place like this didn't call me for advice with seasoning before they opened (I could have saved them tens and tens of thousands of dollars, if not more, in about two hours work), but I suppose they have their own people.

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So apparently when I get something in my head related to food, I have to fulfill the craving or idea immediately (as evidenced by the fact that I went to BonMi yesterday and then today went to get a Banh Mi from Shophouse :rolleyes: ).

Even though I went to Shophouse for dinner on Wednesday night, and went to BonMi on Thursday for lunch, my Friday lunch was back at Shophouse to try out the other item on the menu. The Banh Mi sandwiches are priced the same as the rice/noodle bowls (based on the protein...I think $6.25ish for Chicken, $6.85ish for tofu or chicken/pork meatballs, and $7.20ish for steak?). The sandwich is described as "freshly baked bread filled with your choice of meat, tofu, green papaya slaw, crushed peanuts, and herb salad." You also have the option of adding spicy mayo. Interestingly, I would say at least 95% of the people in there were ordering bowls over sandwiches. I think I saw one other person with a banh mi while I was in the restaurant.

Since I had steak in my noodle bowl on Wednesday, I opted to try the much-touted meatballs today. While I thought they were quite good (crisp on the outside and soft inside), I think I would give a slight nod to the steak. I just preferred that flavor (but I'd definitely recommend both and order both again). This is a fairly large sandwich and stuffed full, so while not as cheap as some of the real ethnic places out in the burbs, I felt like I got my money's worth. I would have preferred more herb/cilantro flavor and a little more spice from the mayo, but the slaw was crisp, and everything meshed well together. Despite a generous sprinkling of peanuts on top, I didn't really taste those at all. I think I would give a (very) slight nod to my sandwich from BonMi yesterday, but both were good and worth ordering. Really, for me it would come down to whichever was more convenient to get to.

Another thing that is not on the menu, but worth noting, is that you can order a "side" of any of the vegetables (eggplant, corn, Chinese broccoli, and long beans) for $1. It's a decent-sized little takeout container of veggies for a decent price. I got the long beans which are "blistered and tossed with caramelized onions." Very tasty, if a little oily, and surprisingly spicy all by themselves.

I arrived just before noon and the line was perhaps 1/3 of the way to the door, but moved fairly quickly. It ebbed and flowed while I was there, but never grew too long, even when I left around 12:30. The tables for eating in were difficult to procure though.

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This is a fairly large sandwich and stuffed full, so while not as cheap as some of the real ethnic places out in the burbs, I felt like I got my money's worth.

I tried the meatball sandwich once. Banh meh. Nothing wrong with it, but it made me sad that I wasn't actually eating at Song Que.

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I don't know if this thread is worth bumping, but having been a regular patron since day 1, I think I have gotten a feel for what is good and has remained consistent and wanted to provide a status update.

I've tried the chicken, steak, meatballs, and tofu on several occasions, and the I think the most consistent protein choice is the chicken. The steak has varied wildly from juicy and flavorful to tough and bland. The tofu is nothing worthwhile, and the meatballs—albeit tasty—are overly greasy for my tastes. This leaves the chicken as the most consistently flavorful protein choice. I usually stick to the broccoli and long beans as my veggie choices, and I think the broccoli has gotten consistently worse since the opening. It used to be bright green and flavorful, and now has descended into a somewhat bland and jaundiced version of its earlier self. The long beans, however, are still good.

Ultimately, my combo of choice has been the chicken and brown rice, topped with half long beans and half broccoli, green curry, papaya salad, and crushed peanuts. Occasionally, I'll get crrraaaazy with the red curry, but it actually is a bit too spicy at times (at least, they're not joking when they say the curries are spicy!).

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I've been a couple times since my previous posts, and the only real notable thing to report is that they no longer have sandwiches. You now only have the option of the bowl (with white or brown rice or noodles). Seems like most people were ordering this anyway on my visits, so I guess I'm not surprised the sandwich is gone.

As stated above, the steak can certainly vary. My first trip it was excellent, but it has been tougher and more gristly the last few times. On my last trip I got the meatballs again and think that is now my leading protein choice.

I also was in the habit of getting the red curry and toughing it out through the spice, but on the last trip switched to green, and I think it made for an overall more pleasant meal where I could taste more of the items in my bowl and didn't leave with a runny nose.

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I haven't been to Shophouse since around the time they opened. What happened to the steak? It used to be chunks of tender beef with some pink in the middle. This time, the steak pieces were hard on the outside (the seasoning contributed to the crunchiness) and chewy. I'm not inclined to get the steak again.

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I haven't been to Shophouse since around the time they opened. What happened to the steak? It used to be chunks of tender beef with some pink in the middle. This time, the steak pieces were hard on the outside (the seasoning contributed to the crunchiness) and chewy. I'm not inclined to get the steak again.

It's been a couple months since I've been, but I agree that the steak is no where near as good as it was at the beginning. The last few times I've stuck with the meatballs. They've always been juicy and flavorful.

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Steak shit the bed somewhere between 4 to 6 months after its opening; it hasn't good in a while. I'm usually happy with the chicken (and meatballs for the occasional variation).

Agreed. I actually wrote them and they told me something to the effect of "they constantly modify their recipes and are sorry for the chewy beef". I stick with the meatballs now. The other proteins have gone downhill.

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I haven't been to Shophouse since around the time they opened. What happened to the steak? It used to be chunks of tender beef with some pink in the middle. This time, the steak pieces were hard on the outside (the seasoning contributed to the crunchiness) and chewy. I'm not inclined to get the steak again.

It's been a couple months since I've been, but I agree that the steak is no where near as good as it was at the beginning. The last few times I've stuck with the meatballs. They've always been juicy and flavorful.

Steak shit the bed somewhere between 4 to 6 months after its opening; it hasn't good in a while. I'm usually happy with the chicken (and meatballs for the occasional variation).

Agreed. I actually wrote them and they told me something to the effect of "they constantly modify their recipes and are sorry for the chewy beef". I stick with the meatballs now. The other proteins have gone downhill.

They got reviewed.

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I actually tried the tofu option recently when I was out west (well, I'll admit, I got half tofu, half steak (my usual filling)).  The tofu was in little pieces and had a crumbly texture.  It was ok.  If I'm looking for a vegetarian Chipotle option, I prefer the faux chicken they had (still have?) at the Chipotle in Dupont Circle. 

I had lunch at Shophouse Southeast Asian Kitchen in Dupont yesterday, and the tofu was exactly as you describe at Chipotle. (A bowl with salad, tofu, eggplant and thai basil, green curry, green papaya slaw, and toasted rice was inexpensive, quick, vegan and delicious.)

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I had lunch at Shophouse Southeast Asian Kitchen in Dupont yesterday, and the tofu was exactly as you describe at Chipotle. (A bowl with salad, tofu, eggplant and thai basil, green curry, green papaya slaw, and toasted rice was inexpensive, quick, vegan and delicious.)

technically I think it's not vegan because I believe the green curry has fish sauce in it

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I had my first ShopHouse experience on Saturday before we went on a MuseumHack tour of the National Gallery (it was a really fun tour, but we got a big discount because they just started, if anyone is interested I believe Molly is a discount code).  I wasn't at all whelmed.  In fact it just really made me wish I was eating at Four Sisters Grill or Cava Grill, both which are worlds above ShopHouse.

I don't think you should let people build their own bowls unless everything tastes good with everything else.  That is one of the keys of Cava Grill and Chipotle.  I had a horrible combination.  After eating sushi for two meals this weekend I didn't want a rice bowl.  I also didn't want chilled noodles, so I ended up with a salad.  The greens weren't spoiled, but it was like they were overly dry in a weird way, they also had a large amount of stems for a salad, this seems like an odd complaint, but if you had seen the salad greens you would understand, I felt like I had more stem than leaves.  I got the chicken satay, next up pick a vegetable- corn has no nutritional value, the "seasonal" vegetable was braised greens on what was an incredibly hot day, so I asked for green beans.  I didn't realize they were sauced and essentially like a Sichuan green bean and I had to wait about 4 minutes while they cooked because they weren't on the line (hence why I couldn't see the sauce).  Not sure why they couldn't just have plan green beans, seems like that would be a good solution, since they have sauces why do you also need to sauce the vegetables with other flavors.  I got the peanut sauce and papaya salad.  It just didn't taste good together and the beans had way too much vinegar.  I ended up picking around eating certain things.  It would have been good without the green beans or with plain green beans.  It would have been really good if papaya salad was a base with satay chicken on top.  Anyway for me it was just an all around fail.  Service was not good, the restaurant was hot as blazes and I just felt like the staff was completely indifferent to everything.

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Kt, never having been there I can't comment on what you observed, but the on-line menu shows the beans as sauced and spicy.  The salad is baby kale and Napa cabbage.  My own opinion of kale is that it is fit only for goats.  Actually the menu looks acceptable, but I'm not going to bother until it's in Fairfax. 

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Kt, never having been there I can't comment on what you observed, but the on-line menu shows the beans as sauced and spicy.  The salad is baby kale and Napa cabbage.  My own opinion of kale is that it is fit only for goats.  Actually the menu looks acceptable, but I'm not going to bother until it's in Fairfax. 

The online menu appears to have a lot more information than the menu that you walk in and see.

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I had my first ShopHouse experience on Saturday before we went on a MuseumHack tour of the National Gallery (it was a really fun tour, but we got a big discount because they just started, if anyone is interested I believe Molly is a discount code).  I wasn't at all whelmed.  In fact it just really made me wish I was eating at Four Sisters Grill or Cava Grill, both which are worlds above ShopHouse.

 ...

Very funny you've posted this view as I've been nagged by the same thought ("Four Sisters Grill or Cava Grill, both which are worlds above ShopHouse.") after quite a bit of experience with all three I've had trouble articulating enough to put Into a post. Your post fired a synapse though.

It's about coherence. Coherence of a regional cuisine. Coherence in a bowl or on a plate. Shophouse lacks that relative to Four Sisters Grill and Cava Grill. I've had Shophouse rice bowls, noodle bowls and salads. They too often seem random in the combinations of proteins, veggies and sauces/condiments, no matter what I get.

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Four Sisters Grill and Cava Grill were both designed having at least *some* authentic soul behind things; Shophouse was designed exclusively to make money, most likely after studying marketing data - it could have just as easily been Kenyan, if that's what they thought the market demanded.

Obviously, I can't prove any of this; these are just my opinions which are based purely on observation and educated guesses.

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Four Sisters Grill and Cava Grill were both designed having at least *some* authentic soul behind things; Shophouse was designed exclusively to make money, most likely after studying marketing data - it could have just as easily been Kenyan, if that's what they thought the market demanded.

Obviously, I can't prove any of this; these are just my opinions which are based purely on observation and educated guesses.

Even so though, it appears Cava Grill is doing much better monetarily as it seems to be expanding more quickly.  I can't believe how much research they probably did to come up with such a crappy concept.

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I still have liked ShopHouse the times I've gone (maybe once every other month or so) *shrug*

Generally go with rice noodles, pork and chicken meatballs, half green beans/half eggplant, green curry, papaya slaw, pickled vegetables, herb salad, and crispy garlic. It hasn't let me down so far!

I didn't even know they had peanut sauce, and honestly, that sounds more likely to clash with the other toppings than either of the curries. I haven't tried it though.

I do agree that they should have some suggested combinations on the menu though (I know Roti has something similar where they have at least one plate, salad, and wrap they recommend).

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From Business Insider:  Chipotle is abandoning its Thai restaurant chain and betting on burgers and pizza instead

Disappointing, it was still one of the more interesting places in Union Station to get carryout.

Quote

The company said Tuesday that it will not invest further in growing and developing ShopHouse, and will pursue "strategic alternatives" for the chain. 

That means Chipotle will likely shut down or try to sell the ShopHouse chain, which has 15 locations in Washington, D.C., Maryland, Illinois, and California.

 

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due to their food safety issues recently, Chipotle has changed the way they prep a lot of their food. lettuce comes in pre-cut, steaks are cooked offsite sous vide then seared at the restaurants (previously I think only the carnitas and barbacoa were done this way), and a few other things that make it seem not as "fresh."

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