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Beef Short Ribs


DanCole42
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If you have (and you should) the French Laundry cookbook, Keller's recipe is stupendouse.

If you don't, the basic recipe is this:

Boil a bottle of red wine together with leeks, carrots, onion, garlic and the usual herbs.

Marinate the ribs in the wine for a day or two.

Dredge ribs in flour and brown.

Tie the meat to the rib with twine or caul fat.

Put ribs in a pot with marinade and enojugh veal and/or chicken stock to cover, braise in the oven for many hours.

Let pot sit in the fridge or back porch (depending on the weather :blink: ) overnight. Skim the congealed fat.

Warm liquid until it's liquid again, remove meat, strain the liquid.

Cook the liquid down to whatever consistency you want, add the ribs and rebraise until warm.

(Being that it's a Keller recipe there are also 26 other painful and time consuming steps, but you can skip them if you're not feeling OCD that week.)

I like to serve it on creamy garlic polenta or mashed potatoes.

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Paula Wolfert's recipe for short ribs in the style of the Camargue, flavored with fennel, pastis, olives, and orange zest, is a great all-around beef braise. The book in which it appears, Slow Mediterranean Cooking, is overall rather spotty, but this recipe is great, and some of the more fussy steps can easily be left out.

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If you have (and you should) the French Laundry cookbook, Keller's recipe is stupendouse.

If you don't, the basic recipe is this:

Boil a bottle of red wine together with leeks, carrots, onion, garlic and the usual herbs.

Marinate the ribs in the wine for a day or two.

Dredge ribs in flour and brown.

Tie the meat to the rib with twine or caul fat.

Put ribs in a pot with marinade and enojugh veal and/or chicken stock to cover, braise in the oven for many hours.

Let pot sit in the fridge or back porch (depending on the weather :blink: ) overnight. Skim the congealed fat.

Warm liquid until it's liquid again, remove meat, strain the liquid.

Cook the liquid down to whatever consistency you want, add the ribs and rebraise until warm.

(Being that it's a Keller recipe there are also 26 other painful and time consuming steps, but you can skip them if you're not feeling OCD that week.)

I like to serve it on creamy garlic polenta or mashed potatoes.

That's basically how I make beef or lamb braises EXCEPT:

I saute a second group of aromatics for the braising pot, along with bay leaf, celery leaves, parsley, thyme and orange peel.

To the cooked wine marinade and stock that comprise the braising liquid, I add a couple of tablespoons of tomato paste, some red wine or sherry vinegar or balsamic vinegar, and a slug of brandy. And another "secret ingredient" that I learned from Michel Richard--some soy sauce.

Also, I was under the impression that to braise meant that the meat wasn't submerged in the liquid. The liquid comes up to about 2/3 of the side of the meat, and then you turn the meat over halfway through the cooking time.

When I made brisket last night, I added some porcini powder to the braising liquid, which is something I haven't always done. Ooo-mommy, that sauce had amazing depth of flavor.

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When I made brisket last night, I added some porcini powder to the braising liquid, which is something I haven't always done. Ooo-mommy, that sauce had amazing depth of flavor.
Zora - my eyes lit up when I saw you'd responded to my mashed potato and short rib posts. I had hoped to hear from you on these. Thank you. :blink:
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The only braised short ribs I've made so far are these by Mario B. http://www.mariobatali.com/recipes_shortribs.cfm .

Mario's recipe has you cooking the short ribs at 375 degrees for two hours. Too hot! Sorry Mario, but I think you are wrong on this one. I say 225 for between three and four hours. Maybe even a little lower than that. For the best texture, you want it to lightly simmer, not boil hard.

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Mario's recipe has you cooking the short ribs at 375 degrees for two hours. Too hot! Sorry Mario, but I think you are wrong on this one. I say 225 for between three and four hours. Maybe even a little lower than that. For the best texture, you want it to lightly simmer, not boil hard.

What I did was knock it down to 325 for 3 hours. The meat was fall apart tender but I lost a lot of my precous braising liquid. I'm definitely going low and slow next time.

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Most recipes I see call for a "full-bodied" red wine.

What are some examples of good short rib braising wines?

Batali's Babbo recipe calls for Barolo (but, Buford, in his book says that the restaurant really used a cheaper Merlot). When I made that recipe, I used a nebbiolo.

To change the immediate subject, I cooked short ribs last night...for my mother's beef vegetable barley soup. We'll have it for dinner tonight. I don't imagine you're looking for this for your Christmas party, but since I just made it, I'll write it out.

She (and her mother) always used short ribs for the beef. I don't have amounts anymore and just wing it, but, you put enough water to cover the short ribs by a couple of inches in a pot and bring to a boil with a couple of bay leaves and salt and pepper. Then add a big (28 oz.?) can of whole tomatoes and a 14-15 oz. can of beef of beef broth. Simmer, uncovered, for a couple of hours until the meat is tender and the liquid has reduced. Smash up the tomatoes along the way. Pull the ribs out, cut the meat into pieces and return to the pot. Add some barley and cook another 45 minutes. Add a couple of peeled, chopped potatoes and cook another half hour. Adjust seasoning and add frozen mixed vegetables and cook until everything is done. This is best made a day ahead and refrigerated, so it's easier to pull out the fat. It also freezes well.

(Given that most recipes I see for making short ribs call for red wine, I've considered adding that to the soup, but my mother never cooked with wine, so I'd rather leave as is. YMMV. Ditto on the frozen vegetables :( )

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I usually use inexpensive but drinkable full-bodied reds from Spain and South America like malbec, grenache, tempranillo, carmenere.
Or try a petit verdot from Australia. Drinkable to some (not to me), there is one retailing around $6.99 at Schneider's that a friend used to make some short ribs last weekend. I believe the label on the bottle was cockatoo ridge?
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Okay.

Here's the scoop.

Both Keller's and Richard's recipes (available in their respective cookbooks) took about the same amount of work, although Keller's took an extra day (to prepare the marinade) and Richard's took longer overall (simply because there was more liquid to reduce).

Here they are side-by-side in the oven to be warmed up after removal from the fridge on Sunday, Richard on the left and Keller on the right:

2087593890_7952353d8c.jpg

Here they are side-by-side on a plate with some plus de beurre mashed potatoes:

2087594088_7966a7bd35.jpg

And this is the fat that I skimmed off and am saving for later for god-knows-what:

2087594302_d68dd8f7a9.jpg

I think for my Christmas party dinner I might combine recipes somewhat. I feel like the marinating that Keller's underwent created a "creamier" texture.

But who's cuisine really reigned supreme?

It was a tie. I strongly preferred Richard's ribs, but I usually prefer heavy red sauces. My wife felt that Keller's, which were lighter, would go over better with a crowd.

So... inconclusive!

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Uhm... is there a difference between beef "short ribs" and regular ol' beef ribs? Any suggestions on how to cook them, other than braising?
I'm not sure what you mean by regular beef ribs. Short ribs are a particular cut--and they can be cut a couple of different ways. I think they're usually chuck, but I'm not too expert on meat cuts. Braising is generally the most popular way of cooking them, but I've seen recipes for marinating and grilling them.
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Uhm... is there a difference between beef "short ribs" and regular ol' beef ribs?
This doesn't explain the difference, but at The County Line in Austin, I've seen 'regular' (or back) beef ribs called Dinosaur ribs and they are HUGE. Looks like the short ribs come from the rib roast cut, which becomes a half standing rib roast when the ribs are removed. This link provides a little more detail.
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With any kind of rib just remember low and slow. You do not need to braise them, but they need to be cooked for a while and at a low temperature. One idea is to smoke them.

How do I describe this? When I think of ribs, I think of pork ribs. With either a dry rub or tomato/vinegar based BBQ sauce. So far, I've seen recipes for "braised" beef ribs. And, they are inevitably described as "short" ribs.

I guess the real question is: what, if anything, should I be aware of when I attempt to "dry" cook beef -- not labeled as "short" -- ribs?

ETA: I like the idea of smoking the ribs. Is it safe to do this inside? I know Ferment Everything has this set-up going on, but he also leaves pots of simmering liquids, unattended!, on the stove when he goes to work out at the gym; he probably has better a homeowner's insurance policy!

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Image from Alton Brown Good Eats. Now you can see all the different kinds of ribs. I was surprised to see that cows have both short ribs and spare ribs, which confuses me, or at least tells me that I have been confusing them for years. Not that I cook ribs much, nobody else in the family loves connective tissue as I do.

If the image won't load, here's the link.

Edit: removed the image, for some reason it makes Firefox (but not IE) hang.

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How do I describe this? When I think of ribs, I think of pork ribs. With either a dry rub or tomato/vinegar based BBQ sauce. So far, I've seen recipes for "braised" beef ribs. And, they are inevitably described as "short" ribs.

I guess the real question is: what, if anything, should I be aware of when I attempt to "dry" cook beef -- not labeled as "short" -- ribs?

ETA: I like the idea of smoking the ribs. Is it safe to do this inside? I know Ferment Everything has this set-up going on, but he also leaves pots of simmering liquids, unattended!, on the stove when he goes to work out at the gym; he probably has better a homeowner's insurance policy!

There are stovetop smokers. I think Zora has mentioned having one (?). There is a thread or portion thereof somewhere dealing with stovetop smokers.

I don't make any kind of ribs that often, but I have made beef ribs basically the way I make baby back pork or spareribs. I use a dry rub and long low heat in the oven, and then add a sauce of some kind near the end.

Short ribs are kind of squared off. The ones I use most often are the English style. Sometimes they're cut into smaller pieces for sale rather than left whole. There's also a kind cut lengthwise, but you can see where each square is on the slab. These are what I think of as short ribs for braising or these. These are the ones cut the other way.

ETA: That last url has links for photos of short ribs from the chuck and plate portions of the anatomy.

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There are stovetop smokers. I think Zora has mentioned having one (?). There is a thread or portion thereof somewhere dealing with stovetop smokers.

I don't make any kind of ribs that often, but I have made beef ribs basically the way I make baby back pork or spareribs. I use a dry rub and long low heat in the oven, and then add a sauce of some kind near the end.

Short ribs are kind of squared off. The ones I use most often are the English style. Sometimes they're cut into smaller pieces for sale rather than left whole. There's also a kind cut lengthwise, but you can see where each square is on the slab. These are what I think of as short ribs for braising or these. These are the ones cut the other way.

ETA: That last url has links for photos of short ribs from the chuck and plate portions of the anatomy.

It appears to me that the cut you are calling short ribs from the plate is also what is called beef spareribs. Link.

Now you've really got me wondering about the difference between these two cuts.

Actually after surfing the site linked above, I realize that I am woefully ignorant about meat, in general. I had no idea how many cuts of beef there are, nor so I have more than a superficial understanding of the cuts I thought I knew. Need a good book.

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It appears to me that the cut you are calling short ribs from the plate is also what is called beef spareribs. Link.

Now you've really got me wondering about the difference between these two cuts.

Those do look like the same thing.
Actually after surfing the site linked above, I realize that I am woefully ignorant about meat, in general. I had no idea how many cuts of beef there are, nor so I have more than a superficial understanding of the cuts I thought I knew. Need a good book.
Different sources have somewhat different information. I have The Complete Meat Cookbook (Aidells and Kelly), which is pretty useful, but I still feel like there's a lot I don't understand.
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Let's take a poll...

Michel Richard's "Silky Syrah Short Ribs"

or

Thomas Keller's "Braised Short Ribs with Whole Grain Mustard"

???

The Keller recipe seems more original in its execution, but the Richard recipe seems like it has more going on.

Thoughts?

I vote for David Burke's Handmade Cavatelli and Braised Short Ribs with wild mushrooms, mushroom chips, and truffle mousse. I don't know if the recipe is online anywhere, but that dish is light years better than the Richard version I had.

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Image from Alton Brown Good Eats. Now you can see all the different kinds of ribs. I was surprised to see that cows have both short ribs and spare ribs, which confuses me, or at least tells me that I have been confusing them for years. Not that I cook ribs much, nobody else in the family loves connective tissue as I do.

If the image won't load, here's the link.

Edit: removed the image, for some reason it makes Firefox (but not IE) hang.

According to the link, there are two different types of ribs and the "short" ribs can be found in two different locations. Which, again, begs the question: how do you cook beef "spare ribs" without braising.

So far, I've marinated (wine, oil, Sirarchi, garlic, S&P) the "spare" ribs and have them roasting, covered, in the marinde, at 350 going on 1.5 hours. I'm going to remove the foil the last 20 minutes of cooking. Check for an update in the "Dinner" thread. :mellow:

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Normally I make braised short ribs in the winter for a nice warm meal. I happened to be at Costco this weekend and found a package that were marbled like a waygu steak, so amazing looking I couldnt pass them up.

Now my question is, how to cook them. Obviouly I have no desire to make a winter type meal with them. I have found a few recipies in which a quick grill on all sides over high heat is an option. Many with a fruit or spicy sauce accopaniment.

Any opinions, suggestions, etc?

Thanks in advance,

Daniel

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I have found a few recipies in which a quick grill on all sides over high heat is an option. Many with a fruit or spicy sauce accopaniment.

Any opinions, suggestions, etc?

The 1 time that I made short ribs was to marinate overnight and quick grill over high (then medium) heat, and it turned out well (or so I was told). I don't have a recipe, but hope this confirmation helps...
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The 1 time that I made short ribs was to marinate overnight and quick grill over high (then medium) heat, and it turned out well (or so I was told). I don't have a recipe, but hope this confirmation helps...
Just be sure to slice them very thinly into strips (maybe 1/4").
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Mrs. B simply scores the ribs and sticks in the oven (400?) until they're crispy on top but still quite red close to the bone. One variation involves sprinkling them beforehand with fresh rosemary, and dipping them into a little berbere as you eat. You can pick up berbere at your local Ethipian supply shop (one on 18th in A-M and another at 6th and Florida). Another variation involves a firey Thai dipping sauce made with lime, sugar, fish sauce and those vicious little Thai peppers.

Perhaps she'll be kind enough to give us a hint on her proportions.

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It sorta sounds like you're looking for a galbi recipe, if you get the pieces to the right thickness. I usually do a marinade of soy sauce, sesame oil, scallions, garlic, sugar and orange blossom honey. For the honey you could sub Coca Cola, which works really nicely and makes it a little tender.

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It sorta sounds like you're looking for a galbi recipe, if you get the pieces to the right thickness. I usually do a marinade of soy sauce, sesame oil, scallions, garlic, sugar and orange blossom honey. For the honey you could sub Coca Cola, which works really nicely and makes it a little tender.

Don't forget adding radish, dates and peeled chestnuts. :lol:

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Geez! I need something warm, comfy and aromatic to ward off the cold weather chill and the gray skies. Is it too late in the day to start braising ribs? There's no way this would be ready for dinner tonight, but... ah! there is tomorrow.

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Geez! I need something warm, comfy and aromatic to ward off the cold weather chill and the gray skies. Is it too late in the day to start braising ribs? There's no way this would be ready for dinner tonight, but... ah! there is tomorrow.
It depends on when you want to eat and how long you think they need to cook. I just started some short ribs for beef-barley-vegetable soup. I'm planning it for tomorrow, but more because I want to be able to skim more fat off than if I serve it right after cooking than because I think there won't be time. 3 1/2 hours should be enough to get my soup cooked (pre-cooked potatoes and frozen vegetables).
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