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alexandria1

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  1. Made my AC&T fried chicken debut last night and thought it was very good, maybe a tiny bit too salty. The donuts from the Pennsylvania Dutch Market on the north side of town are above average and come in a wide variety of flavors.
  2. I had breakfast here a few months ago. IIRC the hash browns & eggs doused in sausage gravy were fine, but I'm not particularly motivated to try any of the non-breakfast items. Come to think of it, I live within walking distance and haven't been motivated to return for breakfast either. They were doing decent business on a Sunday morning, enough well-dressed people that it was probably a post-church crowd.
  3. "Upper Volta" is still sitting unused, and when that becomes stale they can rebrand the restaurant as Burkina Faso.
  4. When they first opened they said it was the same meats as a Pork Barrel, but different sauces. Never been to Pork Barrel myself, so I can't compare. I've found the chopped pork to be the most consistent meat at Sweet Fire Donna's--the brisket, pulled pork, and ribs can all be good on their day, but can also be dry and bland-ish. Overall it's been a great place to have in the neighborhood. Same people also own Tequila & Taco which opened next door at the beginning of May, and maybe their eternally delayed Whiskey & Oyster on John Carlyle Square will one day come to fruition...
  5. Spent a few days in Kuala Lumpur recently. I had been there for a couple short visits before, but not for about five years. Despite some brief stomach distress likely brought on by hotel breakfast (at the Hilton KL), I managed some decent eating: Restoran Sai Woo--This is on the very busy and somewhat touristy Jalan Alor strip of restaurants with mostly outdoor seating, in Bukit Bintang in the center of the city. The "famous" dish here is the chicken wings at Wong Ah Wah restaurant, all the way at the far end of the strip. I had those last time I was in KL and they were good but not life-changing. Wong Ah Wah was mobbed this time, so I went a couple doors down to Sai Woo, which was also doing good business. The grilled chicken wings were excellent (and one Malaysian wing = two US wings), while the spicy sambal squid was not as spicy as I had hoped/feared. Five wings, the squid, and a large Tiger beer (stick with the brown-bottled beer here) came to about US $16. Would definitely recommend heading to Jalan Alor. Roast Duckling--A stall in the "Hutong" food court in the Lot 10 Mall. The idea here is that all the stalls are outposts of "famous" street food stalls, which is better in theory and than in execution. Got the roast duck with rice, the rice was fragrant and flavorful while the roast duck was just okay. For less than $4 US I can't complain. Once had a good char kway teow in this food court but that stall is gone. The top floor of the Lot 10 mall has something like 25 Japanese restaurants, might be interesting. Madam Kwan's--Popular mall chain, Nasi Bojari (similar to Nasi Lemak but with spiced tri-colored rice and beef rendang on the side), and Otak-Otak (spiced fish paste) both very good. Bunn Choon Bakery--In Chinatown just south of the tacky Petaling Street market, egg tart wasn't quite as good as in Macau and Hong Kong IMO--not enough egginess in the custard. Sergeant Chicken Rice--Thanks to the aformentioned stomach distress, I cancelled plans to check out the street food around Kampung Baru and hang around the Suria KLCC. This food court chicken rice did a great job settling the stomach. Kaya toast and iced coffee from Toast Box in the same food court wasn't as good for the stomach, but irresistible nonetheless. Creme Brulee Milk Tea at Royaltea--Picture a standard chain milk tea place, I think there are even branches in the US. Six young people working there, plus a middle-aged man in the corner overseeing things. A man prominently sporting a DUTERTE wristband takes your order. You order the creme brulee milk tea, expecting a vaguely caramelly flavored drink. The six people appear to be working hard, and there was only one other person waiting for a drink, yet five minutes pass and no drinks are forthcoming. The overseer in the corner is getting a little agitated. You spot what looks like it may be your drink, but the cup is barely more than half full. Then Mr. DUTERTE pulls out a whipped cream cannister and your half-cup of milk tea becomes a nearly-full cup of half-whipped cream/half-tea. Your mood brightens, but that now nearly-full cup remains out of your reach. Another minute or two passes--the person who ordered ahead of you hasn't gotten their drink either--and then one of those other six workers reaches into a refrigerator and pulls out a tray of actual creme brulee, places a generous slice on top of the pillow of whipped cream, and finally presents you with your tea. In a sense, the most memorable food experience of the trip, and I really don't want to know how many calories this was. Durian-flavored stuff was everywhere, including a bunch of novelty-ish products. Durian cream puffs at Beard Papas I can understand, but do the locals really eat durian-filled chocolate or drink durian coffee? Lots of Japanese food and shops at the big malls, I think most of them have Japanese investors/developers. Ruling party campaign signs were everywhere, and opposition signs nowhere, even though the opposition was a lock to win about 80% of the vote and almost all the seats in KL and suburbs.
  6. Planning a second location near the Waterfront: "Misha's Coffee Looks To Open at Olde Town Gemstones Location" by Emily Leayman on patch.com
  7. Coming to Alexandria: Jan 3, 2018 - "Casa Tequila Bar and Grill Coming to Alexandria" by Mary Ann Barton on alexandrialivingmagazine.com The address is Duke Street but the actual location is more like the corner of Reinekers Lane and Prince Street, so not the highest-visibility spot.
  8. My brother went to college in DC in a different restaurant era and this was his favorite place, so we went here whenever he was in town. Food was generally decent, although not up to the level of the newer BBQ places in the area. We saw Jared Jeffries and what was presumably his mother here a couple days after he signed his big contract with the Knicks and look what happened to his career after he could no longer come to Old Glory regularly.
  9. They have some "Japanese" flavors on at the moment. The black sesame was very sweet and the frosting quite messy. Blackout donut was excellent.
  10. Old Town location closed at the end of September: http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/news/2017/oct/05/burgerfi-closes-shop/ In my experience the burgers were fine but ordering was very slow if there was any sort of line.
  11. Made my first Skylight Inn visit recently and it lived up to the hype. I even liked the much-maligned cornbread. Visited a few other places as well. Even when I am critical, I enjoyed all these places: Sam Jones BBQ--this is the place that one of the Skylight Inn owners opened on the outskirts of Greenville a few years ago. They serve beer but I stuck with the sweet tea. They also serve BBQ meats other than the traditional Eastern Carolina pork. The pork here had decent flavor but was drier than the Skylight Inn version and lacked the crunchy bits. The ribs were quite good, better than the pork IMO. Cornbread was a same recipe as Skylight Inn but seemed less fresh, giving it a really unappealing texture. Baked beans were much too sweet, Mac and cheese was Mac and cheese. Wilber's, Goldsboro--Pork was sauced a little more aggressively than I would have preferred. I am not a slaw person but I liked the tangy version here. The Pit, Raleigh--I went with the fried chicken and it was good. Even though this is a "fancy" place in downtown Raleigh a quarter chicken with two sides and a basket of hush puppies and a biscuit cost $8.59, and a half chicken would have been just $9.99.
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