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Maketto, Chef James Wozniuk's Asian Street Food and Fashion Market at H Street and Linden Court NE

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I bought some amazing pickled ramps at Honeycomb a few weeks ago and am getting low. They didn't have them in stock when I was there a few weeks ago, but I'm hoping that since it's ramps season they'll do another batch.

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We also had a wonderful meal there on Friday.  Be sure you order the oysters and a (newish?) stuffed tofu dish.  Believe it or not, both the wok fried chinese broccoli and the beef curry -- both of which were *very* good at dinner -- were even better when reheated the next day.

Given the abundance of Asian restaurant options in California, specifically San Diego and the Bay Area, I was surprised my brother and my cousin wanted to go to Maketto during their short trip in DC from California. We ended up having a late dinner there Friday evening a few hours after their arrival.

Between MichaelBDC, my brother, my cousin, and myself we split the wok fried chinese broccoli, spicy laab over bone marrow, fried chicken, and New York strip bao platter. We enjoyed it all even though the laab ignited a fire in my mouth that was difficult to drown and the fried chicken itself was not as spicy as I remember it. We all thought it was great, especially the fried chicken.

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We also had a wonderful meal there on Friday.  Be sure you order the oysters and a (newish?) stuffed tofu dish.  Believe it or not, both the wok fried chinese broccoli and the beef curry -- both of which were *very* good at dinner -- were even better when reheated the next day.

How did you reheat them? Things like this are *incredibly* valuable information to people - thanks for writing it.

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Ashamed to say that I simply microwaved them; they'd probably be even better if properly reheated.

How did you reheat them? Things like this are *incredibly* valuable information to people - thanks for writing it.

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Ashamed to say that I simply microwaved them; they'd probably be even better if properly reheated.

I haven't done something *this* amateurish in nearly ... thirty minutes.

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For his last meal in DC, my chefly brother-in-law suggested Daikaya or Thip Khao; however, I was working from home in SE and couldn't take enough time off for lunch that far away.  So, I suggested that we check out Maketto - shockingly, it was my first time there as well.  I think the clothing store and the laid-back, order-at-the-counter lunch vibe confused my guests a bit at first, but they wound up loving everything, and so did I.  We sat out in the courtyard and let the kiddo run around, and we ordered a bunch of stuff: the pork and leek bao (the former was the winner), the Cambodian pork noodle soup (pho-like and very light and comforting), the Cambodian num pang sandwich (tied for my favorite item - great flavors and textures), the spicy beef rice bowl with fried egg and pickles (yum), and the lo mein (my other favorite).  The weakest item was the dessert from the menu, the fried donut sticks with soy milk - the donuts were super greasy, and the soy milk just didn't seem sweet enough.  However, there were some baked goods out at the counter that were delicious - pecan/toffee/chocolate chip cookies and coconut lemon whoopie pies definitely hit the spot.

Mr. Bruner-Yang was there hanging out and was super friendly to all - he and my brother-in-law, unsurprisingly, knew a bunch of the same people and had a quick chat.  I can't believe I waited this long to get to Maketto, but I can assure you I won't wait like that before returning.

Also, I brought a bunch of stuff (many of the same items we ordered) back for hubby and I to eat later/the next day, and everything was really tasty leftover.  Win!

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The fried donut stick and soy milk aren't desserts. What they're doing on the dessert menu is beyond me. Mr. Bruner-Yang is peddling street Taiwanese cooking at fine dining prices to uninitiated diners. Sadly, there are Taiwanese restaurants in the DC area but not in hipster neighborhoods. So I'd discount somewhat anything said about anything done by Mr. Bruner-Yang.

EDITED to clarify my post.

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The fried donut stick and soy milk aren't desserts. What they're doing on the dessert menu is beyond me. Mr. Bruner-Yang is peddling Taiwanese cooking at fine dining prices to uninitiated diners. Sadly, there are Taiwanese restaurants in the DC area but not in hipster neighborhoods. So I'd discount anything said about anything done by Mr. Bruner-Yang.

I guess the small plates journey didn't go well.

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12 hours ago, CapitalGourmand said:

I've been following Johnny Spero since the two meals I had at Suna during its short lifespan. I really wanted to check him out during his time at minibar. Alas, he left for Mugaritz about a month before my reservation. So I was more than happy to purchase a ticket to the collaborative 6-course meal he created with James Wozniuk at Maketto this past Sunday.

Say hi next time.  I think we may have been seated next to each other...

I'll just add another plug for putting that amazing sausage on the standing menu.  Such a great balance of flavors and an amazing texture.  Probably the most I've ever enjoyed any sausage anywhere. 

We were also impressed by the terrific job Colin did with the wine pairings.  It's easy to forget how talented of a chef James Wozniak is and I didn't realize that Colin Sugaski is as skilled in selecting wines to complement Maketto's varied menu as he is at crafting delicious cocktails.  Maketto is a lot of things and works better in different ways for different people, but there are numerous reasons that it won the RAMMY for best new restaurant and I'd encourage folks who haven't done dinner here yet to make a reservation to go and explore the menu. 

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6 hours ago, youngfood said:

Say hi next time.  I think we may have been seated next to each other... 

Will do!

And if we ever happen to be dining out at the same place at the same time and you see me before I see you, feel free to come over and say hi.

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I've been to Maketto for coffee and I've been for lunch (can't seem to deviate from ordering the Cambodian pork noodle soup), but last night was the first time for dinner.  Between us, my husband and I ordered four dishes to share, ordering and receiving the first two before deciding whether or not to get one or two more.  Our server explained the various portion sizes and recommended we get 2 small and 1 large.  In the end we got 2 small and 2 large and brought food home with us.  

The last course and the one I was anticipating the most -- the Taiwanese fried chicken with 5 spice caramel and bread -- was sweeter than I was expecting, though my husband said he expected it to be sweet from the description.  OK, duh. I shouldn't have been surprised. I thought the chicken was prepared well, but when I got too much of the caramel, it subtracted from rather than added to my enjoyment.  It was overall good but my expectations were off base, I guess.  I had one slice of the bread (house made bread gets me every time, no matter how full I am, and I was pretty full by this point in the evening).

We loved the wok fried noodles, which is what we started with.  That's definitely a large portion, seemingly a bottomless bowl, and I kept eating more and more of them.  The flavor and texture were wonderful.  Could not stop eating these. The cumin lamb went well with them (so much for vegan noodles), and I topped some of my noodles with the half of the lamb square that was mine, all mine. Such a perfect crust of an exterior and melting lamb inside that shredded on contact. We were curious as to how this was prepared. Perhaps we should have asked;). Our third plate, the laab with bone marrow, had a beautiful presentation. I almost missed the rice that was nestled under the bone but then fought to get my share.  That and the noodles packed quite a bit of heat, and I was downing plenty of water, but it was a delicious heat. 

Our busy but attentive server asked if we wanted the bone as well as the remaining laab boxed up at the end of the meal, and I said yes, thinking I might be able to make some kind of broth out of it. We shall see.  

 

 

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Finally went there for their "dim sum" brunch.

The shrimp dumplings and spicy laab siu mai were both swimming in nước chấm.  I liked the shrimp dumplings very much, seems to follow the traditional recipe, but spiced up a bit with red chilies and the aforementioned sauce.  The spicy laab was definitely hot, enough to make you sweat a little; however, it was also quite salty.

The you tiao (donut sticks) was $5, and 2/3 of normal size.  I didn't realize it also came with soy milk (I see it on the website, but the restaurant menu doesn't mention soy milk accompaniment).  My final dish was the Cambodian pork curry - basically a bowl of ground pork with the consistency of porridge, served with a bowl of lightly steamed vegetables (radishes, cucumber, carrots, etc.) and rice. 

If I lived within walking distance, I'd go back.  Otherwise, no.

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We go here at least once a month, and it remains one of my absolute favorite restaurants in the city. Consistently very good food. The spicy laab, the shrimp dumplings, and the fried chicken are probably my favorite things that are consistently on the menu, although the specials are also outstanding. 

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On 7/4/2017 at 11:12 AM, Marty L. said:

Any recent dinner experiences/recommendations?

Went with a few others last Thursday night, and had the same experience we always do - super fun atmosphere and service / outstanding food. Highlights for us were the spicy laab, the pork curry (more like a porridge, and super good with the crisp raw vegetables alongside), and (surprisingly) the shrimp toast, which was almost like a pate spread into a warm brioche loaf. Note: the lamb ribs are straight-up not good. I love Erik, I love James, and I love the place...but the lamb ribs just aren't a good dish. Tough, stringy, gristly; maybe we got a bad batch, but the fried chicken here is just too perfect an entree (and the whole fish too perfect a substitute if you aren't feeling chicken) to waste time trying the lamb ribs. I get the intent, but the flavors and execution weren't there. 

But, takeaway: still hip! still fun! still great food!

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4 minutes ago, lhollers said:

Went with a few others last Thursday night, and had the same experience we always do - super fun atmosphere and service / outstanding food. Highlights for us were the spicy laab, the pork curry (more like a porridge, and super good with the crisp raw vegetables alongside), and (surprisingly) the shrimp toast, which was almost like a pate spread into a warm brioche loaf. Note: the lamb ribs are straight-up not good. I love Erik, I love James, and I love the place...but the lamb ribs just aren't a good dish. Tough, stringy, gristly; maybe we got a bad batch, but the fried chicken here is just too perfect an entree (and the whole fish too perfect a substitute if you aren't feeling chicken) to waste time trying the lamb ribs. I get the intent, but the flavors and execution weren't there. 

But, takeaway: still hip! still fun! still great food!

Thanks, Mark and lhollers.  It's been too long and I'm hankering to get back.  
 

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Quote

What: Danielle Chang, star of PBS’s hit food series Lucky Chow and founder of popular New York-based roving food festival LUCKYRICE, is bringing her Cantonese cuisine and Singaporean street foods to D.C. for one night only.

Details: Chef Erik Bruner-Yang’s Maketto will host the festival’s first-ever D.C. stop. Expect dim sum, bing bread and dip, steamed whole branzino, and spicy lamb noodles, and pastries from Brothers and Sisters chef Pichet Ong. 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $150 per person. 1351 H Street NE

I copied that from Eater.  They must've gone to seminars hosted by Needless Markup because that's some proper gouging.  Also, one must be an American Express card member.

"Breaking Bao: A Sunday Supper in Washington, DC" on luckyrice.ticketfly.com

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"Bing bread" drives me nuts. I noticed it as Momofuku, too. It reminds me of when people say "naan bread," which also drives me nuts. But according to Wikipedia "bing" literally means "biscuit," and "naan" means "bread," so I guess saying "naan bread" is worse than saying "bing bread."

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1 hour ago, dracisk said:

"Bing bread" drives me nuts. I noticed it as Momofuku, too. It reminds me of when people say "naan bread," which also drives me nuts. But according to Wikipedia "bing" literally means "biscuit," and "naan" means "bread," so I guess saying "naan bread" is worse than saying "bing bread."

There's this and this (*) - it's just a young intern, trying to sell tickets: sort of a Bao Movement, or a Mousy Tongue.

(*) Although at least both of those are correct! With the Bing Bread, ewe knead too core rectum.

Eye thing kai yam go wing two right tall few chirp post sin us him Miller four mat.

Oar knot.

Butt tyke hood!

May bee eye wilt rye.

Orm Abe bean Ott.

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On 10/11/2018 at 4:58 PM, DonRocks said:

There's this and this

Yes, they both seem like dumbing down, which surprised me at Momofuku, but maybe it shouldn't have.

(Both meaning "bing bread" and the kiddie science link.)

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