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My mother would’ve wanted us to go out to eat! She loved restaurants and good food. Growing up here, you don’t necessarily appreciate it because you are steeped in it, but when you go away and you rea

Things I never thought I’d do on Mardi Gras day wake up at 915 drive a car eat 10# crawfish be conscious for the meeting of the courts of Rex and Comus HAPPY MARDI GRAS YALL!!

Home for the holidays. I convinced my not so ambulatory, elderly parents to do a 3:00 reservation at Pasquale's Manale, which all the locals call "Manales." What a fabulous choice. This place has not

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This is the link to WWL television which is a LIVE stream of the actual television broadcast:

http://www.wwltv.com/perl/common/video/wmP...&props=livenoad

I love this city: there is passion and conviction in the hearts of all those who live there for their city's culinary heritage. After tonight I fear that it may never be the same. The above link would not have been possible only a few years ago. Today, as long as there is power, you can watch first hand as if you are living there while this unprecedented tragedy sadly unfolds.

I wish the best for all of those in the path of this storm.

Note: As of midnight they have closed their television studio in the French Quarter and are broadcasting from a remote location at LSU in Baton Rouge which is about 80 miles west of NOLA. Unfortunately, the reception on the web is intermittently spotty unlike earlier which had been uninterrupted. WWL also has a 50,000 watt clear channel radio station at 870 AM which can be picked up from the D. C. suburbs after dark. Reception typically is spotty but this evening it came in clear around 10:00PM. It's website is: http://www.wwl.com/

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Through my work, we have been involved with the US shrimp, crawfish, crab and and catfish farmers, producers and processors in the areas being hit by Katrina. I saw several families I have met interviewed on the news. Say a prayer for their safety and livelihood - these are families and industries already operating under distressed conditions and barely able to make ends meet.

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I don't know what's scarier. The flooding, the wind damage, the stranded people -or- the dregs of society taking thier kids to the Winn Dixie for a cart full of five finger discount food.

Oh, the humanity.....but hey, they're eating filet mignon tonight!!

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I was just in New Orleans earlier this week. The devastation is overwhelming. Block after block of gutted out homes. And even in the areas that were not terribly damaged by the storm -- the city is a ghost town. Not many businesses are open, and the streets are dark and empty. It is upsetting, and I can only hope that the New Year brings hope and renewal to that wonderful city.

While there, I did have a wonderful dinner at one of the restaurants back in business, Cuvee, in the CBD. My hope was that putting money into the economy, in any way, has to be a good thing. And the side effect of that was a phenomenal dinner. If anyone is in NOLA and is looking for a treat, check it out.

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Guys, I'd give my left earlobe for Cuvee to be here. It's similar to Vidalia in some ways. Sadly, its sommelier, Jeff Kundinger, is leaving the restaurant to spend more time with his family, who he's seen three times since Katrina. But it's a great spot, with great people and one of the best yound dining room managers out there in Chris Ycaza. And they sell lots of Wild Grape wine :-).

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I don't think Don will object when I tell you that reading Brooks Hamaker's dispatches on eGullet (the Louisiana forum), are heart-breaking. Please visit that site and read his stuff. He now wants us all to visit, although I don't know where there is to stay.

A great, unique American city has been ruined. It is beyond my comprehension that we could allow such a thing to happen and not do whatever we can to alleviate this situation.

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I could definately use some pointers for New Orleans. During my last trip there, I got sucked into the unholy vortex of bourbon street and ended up eating at what were some of the worst "restaurants" I have ever been. Luckily, I hear there will be plenty of great food vending during Jazzfest....

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Cuvee...see above.

Cooter Brown's for great beer, great oysters, sport, and Wi-Fi.

[speaking of oysters, the Acme in the Quarter has reopened]

Herbsaint, August for more fine dining

Domilise's for seafood po-boys

Parasol's for roast beef po-boys and good Guinness

d.b.a....the best drinker's bar around. Bring your own food (plenty of good options around).

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One word: Longbranch.

Go now.

Indeed.

Sara and I ate dinner at Longbranch--located in Abita Springs, on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain--in mid-March. It was the best meal of our trip to NOLA, although we also ate very well at August, Jacques-Imo's, Drago's, Felix's Uptown, and Herbsaint.

Allison and Slade are doing something special at Longbranch, bringing it home from appetizer to dessert. Longbranch's wine list is also reasonably priced and well thought, with a heavy nod toward Europe.

I rarely get excited by a salad, but Longbranch's current one is beautifully done. The foie gras appetizer may be the best one I've ever eaten. And the flavors in the perfectly cooked beef filet were in perfect unison.

Here is Longbranch's current menu--not including desserts which should not be overlooked.

Appetizers

Oyster Rockefeller "Deconstructed" -14-

Pan Roasted Sweetbreads, Truffle Grits, Glazed Bacon Lardons -13-

Covington Market Lettuces, Organic Sprouts, Louisiana Meyer Lemonette -8-

Salt Cured Foie Gras, Louisiana Strawberry Jam, Warm Country Biscuit -18-

White Asparagus Soup, Asparagus Marmalade, Louisiana Crawfish -12-

Blue Crab Stuffed Tomato, Creole Remoulade, Avocado Mousse -15-

Entrees

Smoked Pepper Dusted Filet of Beef, Parsley Potato Confit, Shallot Sauce -30-

Filo Crusted Dover Sole, Fondue of Carrots and Leeks, Sweet Red Pepper Jus -32-

Wild Striped Bass, Caramelized Artichokes, Tomato Confit, Spicy Lobster Sauce -26-

Poached Foie Gras Stuffed Duck Breast, Scallions, Toasted Quinoa, Hibiscus Syrup -29-

Rabbit Saddle "AU Boudin", Cabbage Choucroute, Creole Mustard Jus -28-

Here's a link to a recent Times-Picayune review.

And here's a photo of the restaurant:

post-310-1143781183_thumb.jpg

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It's JazzFest in New Orleans... and for the first time in many years, I'm not there. Of all the years to miss, this seems like the worst choice -- eight months after Katrina, with the city fighting to rebuild and its people yearning to return. With another hurricane season approaching, new evacuation plans being unveiled, a mayoral election pitting old New Orleans politics against new... In some ways, the more things change, the more they stay the same. In others, New Orleans will never be the same again. I still miss it.

For those of you lucky enough to be on your way down for JazzFest this weekend, or for some other reason soon, a list of my "can't miss" restaurants follows. (I don't know whether they've all reopened after the storm.) Be sure to poke your head into one of the jazz or blues clubs in the Fauborg or Uptown, avoid Bourbon Street at all costs, and tip your hat to the local New Orleanians, who are fighting for and celebrating the rebirth of their city every day.

Longbranch - Abita Springs - see above.

Bon Ton Cafe - CBD - near the courthouse, this is where lawyers and judges go for lunch after arguments; it's worth it more for its place in NOLA history than its food, although their bread pudding with whiskey sauce is a good way to clog your arteries...

Cuvee - CBD - see above - run, don't walk.

Herbsaint - CBD - one of Susan Spicer's restaurants, and possibly my favorite for lunch.

Horinoya - CBD - surprisingly good Japanese. If you're a visitor, you probably don't need sushi during your time in NOLA. If you're a local, this place satisfies a craving.

Mother's - CBD - my favorite lunch counter in town, stop here for a bowl of gumbo, and whatever looks good. Don't expect it to be healthy. But expect it to taste amazing.

Palace Cafe - CBD - owned by the Brennan family (see Commander's Palace, Brennan's), and my favorite of the bunch. Solid food, without pretension or the resting on laurels/unevenness of the others.

Restaurant August - CBD - one of the best newer restaurants in town, Chef Besh works wonders with his menu. And located in an old bank building, the space is phenomenal.

Bayona - French Quarter - Susan Spicer has probably received most fame for this sweet restaurant, located in a romantic little house in the Quarter.

Cafe du Monde - French Quarter - beignets and cafe au lait. Best to start off your morning, or end your night. If you're wearing black, you'll be dusted in powdered sugar by the time you're done, but you won't care!

Central Grocery - French Quarter - home of the muffaletta.

Peristyle - French Quarter - another fine-dining can't miss.

Port of Call - French Quarter - be a local, go here for beers and burgers.

Trolley Stop Cafe - Lee Circle - another local haunt, this one is good for a greasy breakfast after a long New Orleans night. So is Camellia Grill.

Brigtsen's - Riverbend - one of my favorite little restaurants, Frank Brigtsen works wonders with local flavors.

Jacques-Imo's - Riverbend - loud, raucous, no reservations, and delicious.

And, if you have the time and the inclination, travel west two hours to Cajun Country. Wonderful people, fascinating culture, vibrant music and nightlife, and some gems of restaurants... the best po-boy in Louisiana is at Olde Tyme in Lafayette, and a zydeco brunch that'll bring you to your feet to dance is at Cafe des Amis in Breaux Bridge. Oh, I miss it...

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I have to echo all the good things that have been siad so far about Cuvee. Based on the recommendations here I took some clients there two weeks ago and had a great meal, along with one of jparrot's wines. Do not miss the pork belly with chile glaze. People are constantly amazed at my ability to always find good places, especially hidden gems like this, in cities I've never been to. I just smile and say "I have my sources."

My other meal in town (not my choice) was at K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen, Paul Prudhomme's place. I was a little hesitant, but ended up havign a very nice meal there too. My advice here - if one chef is almost single-handedly responsible for making a cooking technique nationally popular (i.e. Prudhomme and blackened fish), you should give it a shot. I didn't and had a very good etoufee, but I was able to snag some of the blackened drumfish from my boss sitting next to me. Spicy but not overwhelming, cooked perfectly.

This place is a little old school, with mixed vegetables coming with every entree and a menu that probably hasn't changed much in 25 years. But it didn't feel like a waste either. Plus I got to meet Prudhomme, who was sitting on a scooter outsied the restaurant greeting people as they came in.

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Cafe du Monde - French Quarter - beignets and cafe au lait.  Best to start off your morning, or end your night.  If you're wearing black, you'll be dusted in powdered sugar by the time you're done, but you won't care!

Yep - Black shirt and charcoal pants looked really nice with a dusting of sugar on my last morning there.

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Important safety tip:

Breathe in before bringing beignet anywhere near face.

Do not accidentally inhale confectioner's sugar.  Repeat, do not inhale sugar.  Injury to dignity may result.

Made me chuckle. Gosh, I miss New Orleans. Must plan trip. Summer is of course the worst time to go, but I don't think I can wait til the weather turns cool again... in October...

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I have to echo all the good things that have been siad so far about Cuvee.  Based on the recommendations here I took some clients there two weeks ago and had a great meal, along with one of jparrot's wines.  Do not miss the pork belly with chile glaze.  People are constantly amazed at my ability to always find good places, especially hidden gems like this, in cities I've never been to.  I just smile and say "I have my sources."

My other meal in town (not my choice) was at K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen, Paul Prudhomme's place.  I was a little hesitant, but ended up havign a very nice meal there too.  My advice here - if one chef is almost single-handedly responsible for making a cooking technique nationally popular (i.e. Prudhomme and blackened fish), you should give it a shot.  I didn't and had a very good etoufee, but I was able to snag some of the blackened drumfish from my boss sitting next to me.  Spicy but not overwhelming, cooked perfectly. 

This place is a little old school, with mixed vegetables coming with every entree and a menu that probably hasn't changed much in 25 years.  But it didn't feel like a waste either.  Plus I got to meet Prudhomme, who was sitting on a scooter outsied the restaurant greeting people as they came in.

K-Paul's has the best slice of cake that I have ever had in my life: fresh coconut (two coconuts are cracked to make it) served on a "puddle" of Chantilly whipped cream (laced with Courvoisier and Grand Marnier and a bit of sour cream mixed in). You have to order it in advance; it only appears on the menu when this is done. Similarly, they also have a great caramel cake that must be ordered in advance. Anyone going there should seriously consider this. Also, Chef Paul has the best bbq'd shrimp I've ever had-better than Pascal Manale's, Emeril's, all of them. Serious, funky, murky seafood gumbo, too.

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I've got to say that MBK has quite a good list going. I'm yet to visit Longbranch in Abita Springs, though. Also, I have not met a native New Orleanian who has been to K-Paul's in a very, very long time (myself included). I can't say that it is good or bad, but it's definitely seen as a tourist joint.

Sadly, word on the street is that Camellia Grill will not be reopening anytime soon. The owner has put it up for sale and there are no current plans to reopen.

I was in NOLA two weekends ago and ate very well, as always. My first experience at August was really terrific. Service was a little jerky and creepy, but it was a fantastic meal and a cool space. Strongly considered going back there the next night.

The prices at Lola's on Esplanade are up a little bit since before the storm, but there was still a line of people out the door at the Creole/Med BYO. The garlic shrimp and the calamari still make this one of my favorite restaurants in town.

Also made it out to Deanie's in Bucktown for big servings of fried-everything-in-the-sea (oh, and fried artichoke hearts too). They haven't skipped a beat. Still haven't made it to the Deanie's in the Quarter, but I'm willing to bet it is a good choice.

My advice for anyone heading down is to be prepared to use a lot of patience. Not everything is working right, it's very tough for businesses to find good workers, and there is no "normal" anymore for everyone. Imagine my surprise to be turned away from Clover Grill on Bourbon at 11pm one evening because there were 45 minutes worth of take-out orders queued up ahead of us. Unheard of (and they aren't open 24 hours anymore either).

La Marquise Pastry Shop on Chartres seems to be shuttered for good, which is awful, but Croissant d'Or on Ursaline St. had a line of patrons out the door. Hopefully they are raking in the business.

A great time is still easily had, but you just have to take the numerous obstacles and inconveniences in stride. if you go down with that mindset, you're going to have a great time.

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I've got to say that MBK has quite a good list going. I'm yet to visit Longbranch in Abita Springs, though. Also, I have not met a native New Orleanian who has been to K-Paul's in a very, very long time (myself included). I can't say that it is good or bad, but it's definitely seen as a tourist joint.

Agree wholeheartedly on K-Paul's. Considered by locals in the same vein as Emeril's.

Sadly, word on the street is that Camellia Grill will not be reopening anytime soon. The owner has put it up for sale and there are no current plans to reopen.

I read that in the Times this morning... so sad. That place was an institution.

I was in NOLA two weekends ago and ate very well, as always. My first experience at August was really terrific. Service was a little jerky and creepy, but it was a fantastic meal and a cool space. Strongly considered going back there the next night.

Jerky and creepy? By that, do you mean came in fits and starts, or do you mean they were actually jerks and creeps? :)

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Someone, anyone, please go to New Orleans and open a diner. Serve whatever you want otherwise, but you must, must, must, must serve homemade chocolate pecan pie, heated on the griddle.

I miss Camellia Grill.

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Someone, anyone, please go to New Orleans and open a diner.  Serve whatever you want otherwise, but you must, must, must, must serve homemade chocolate pecan pie, heated on the griddle.

I miss Camellia Grill.

Slightly off-topic, but have you had the warm homemade chocolate pecan pie at Cafe des Amis in Breaux Bridge? It does the trick.

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Is Breaux Bridge on the streetcar line? Down the street from Cooter Browns? And this is no simply warm pie...this is pie warmed on a hamburger griddle and served by one of the best servers you'll have in any restaurant, at any price point, who'll spot you a buck if you're short, remembers what you're studying and has more empathy than the next ten people.

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Is Breaux Bridge on the streetcar line?  Down the street from Cooter Browns?  And this is no simply warm pie...this is pie warmed on a hamburger griddle and served by one of the best servers you'll have in any restaurant, at any price point, who'll spot you a buck if you're short, remembers what you're studying and has more empathy than the next ten people.

I know, I know... I've been to and love and now miss Camellia Grill. I was just trying to offer a not-quite-the-same-but-still-feels-like-home substitute. For when you just want warm, chocolatey, pecan goodness tempting your tastebuds as the zydeco music tickles your ears.

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Today I drove past this shuttered place with a crew of Hornets employees (now living in OKC). All sighed and lamented its loss.

Is there anywhere particularly good for breakfast near the Wyndham Canal Place? I've been stuffed full of bad food at catered events (including one country club meal - argh) these last two days and am trying to escape the tyranny for one good bite to eat. I don't have lots of time so somewhere near the Wyndham is required.

I miss Camellia Grill.

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Today I drove past this shuttered place with a crew of Hornets employees (now living in OKC).  All sighed and lamented its loss.

Is there anywhere particularly good for breakfast near the Wyndham Canal Place?  I've been stuffed full of bad food at catered events (including one country club meal - argh) these last two days and am trying to escape the tyranny for one good bite to eat.  I don't have lots of time so somewhere near the Wyndham is required.

That's not the best area for food... if you see a Rue de la Course coffee shop, that wouldn't be bad, but I can't recall any of their locations being near the Wyndham. Your best bet, if you have time, is to wander into the Quarter for either Cafe du Monde, Brennan's (if you want the real shtick of New Orleans breakfast), or the coffee shop half a block down the street from the W French Quarter (I can't remember its name, but it's pretty good). Sorry I can't be more helpful!

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Jerky and creepy? By that, do you mean came in fits and starts, or do you mean they were actually jerks and creeps? :)

Sorry - I could have been more descriptive. Jerky was to mean "fits and starts" and creepy means creepy. Started being parked at the bar for about 15 minutes. Had a great strawberry mojito from a very reserved bartender who didn't really look at us while talking to us. In those 15 minutes we realized that she was most probably blind as she bumped into things several times and nearly felt her way around the bar. Still not entirely certain, tho.

We were asked for drink orders (we declined) by a waiter who never returned. We saw him dealing with tables near us, but he never made his way back to us. After about 15 minutes(!), another waiter approached and took our order. Again, had a superb meal, though Waiter #2 would sometimes disappear for long stretches. He also made a few odd comments and was totally in his own world - but seemed quite nice.

Three or four times throughout the evening, most of the dining room heard cheering and loud merriment from what I assume was the kitchen.

We finished our entrees and as Waiter #2 was clearing them, I told him that we were going to need to skip dessert. He didn't seem to hear, so I said it again a little more loudly. Nothing. He returned a few minutes later with the dessert menus asking if we wanted dessert.

While waiting for the check, Waiter #1 stopped by and sincerely apologized for not spending very much time with us and hoped that Waiter #2 took good care of us. Not really sure why he did that - it's not like we know the guy or had any sort of bond after telling him that we were still nursing drinks from the bar at the beginning of the meal.

So I guess a more fitting description of the service would be "off-beat." Nothing wrong with it, but just was a sharp contrast to the upscale surroundings and food. Regardless, I'm still plotting my return there. Really fantastic - John Besh deserves the awards and praise.

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I had the good fortune to dine at Uglesich's (sp? sorry!) before it closed last year (did so early last year IIRC). Great joint.

Also got to dine at a place called Herbsaint that was pretty good. Great frog legs. Anyone been there recently?

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Went to Mother's for lunch today. After a long wait in the hot sun we were rewarded with po boys galore. I had the "debris" -- the bits that fall off when roasting beef. Think a roast beef version of pulled pork. There was a bit too much jus (can you call it jus when it is part of a po boy???) to eat as a sandwich and still make it out presentable enough for an afternoon meeting. While deliciously moist and more pink meat then you'd think, I felt like an idiot eating with a fork. One of my dining companions was more adventurous and ate his ham, cheese, and debris like a sandwich and had to change his shirt before the meeting. Third in our party had turkey. I have no explanation for that. We all left happy and sated without being stuffed because we ordered the smalls which, while no means small, are not gut busters.

Wasn't able to talk people into Cuvee for dinner. S'ok, I have two more nights and will go by myself my last night if need be. Went instead to Acme. One diner is from Apalachicola and said that while the oysters were good, they couldn't hold a candle to what he gets at home. Which makes you wonder why he orders oysters away from home. I had the chicken andouille gumbo. Nicely spiced but not enough andouille. The vegetarian of our group had very slim pickings - cole slaw, hush puppies, and french fries for dinner. Had we known he was vegetarian we'd have picked someplace else. Another of our party had the softshell crab po boy that looked wonderful. It was lightly breaded and fried without being greasy.

Thankfully they've raised our travel allowance for meals.

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Our post-session chatter ran too far into our lunch break and we had to get something quick. Opted for Welty's deli. I had a very nice roasted chicken salad sandwich with seasoned kettle chips. The chicken was very moist and minimal mayo was involved - just the way I like it.

I was able to convince a few folks to go to Cuvee with me. We were all impressed with our meal and once again you've earned me points with colleagues for knowing where to go. I had the osso bucco - falling off the bone tender with a rich glaze, white bean casoulet, and marrow whipped potatos. The presentation of the potato was very clever - they hollowed out a roast potato and filled it wth the whipped potatos so it looked like you were eating the marrow out of the bone. Meeting fatigue prevents me from being able to describe what others ate but plates were cleaned. We all let our waiter match up wines with our entrees and he made some excellent selections. Dessert was good, but not as good as the meal. I had a chocolate torte that was quite rich and very dense with an unbelievably hard to cut through crust. You really had to lean on it to cut through it. It was served with a somewhat bland strawberry-almond ice cream that just couldn't stand up to the rich chocolate of the torte. Drizzled around it was an aged balsamic caramel sauce. I could drink a gallon of the stuff.

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Final installment of my New Orleans meeting eating report.

Lunch at Cafe Adelaide was very enjoyable. I almost went with 2 appetizers instead of an entree (three tomato salad of fried green tomatos, romas, and cherrys with crab and bbq shrimp shortcakes) but we were tight on time and I didn't want to slow things down by them bringing me a sequence of dishes and the waiter was a little confused when I asked to get them both at once. I have no regrets about switching to the shrimp boil salad. It was exactly what it sounds like. A bunch of shrimp lightly dressed with Abita aioli, with the potatos, corn, and sausage from a shrimp boil over a bed of greeens. It was a nice upscale twist on a great meal. They have a great bar and lounge area that I could easily see passing many hours in.

Dinner was at Bon Ton Cafe. I had shrimp etouffee. It was rich but a little underseasoned. Didn't stop me from sopping my plate clean with the crusty bread. Others enjoyed fried crawfish tails and softshell crab Alvin -- fried crab topped with lump crabmeat and mushroom sauce. We shared four bread puddings amongst the five of us for dessert. This was rich, creamy, and unsafe to eat before driving thanks to a healthy does of whiskey sauce.

I left New Orleans ready to return and pleasantly surprised that it isn't that far a drive.

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I'm pretty sure this is going to be rambling. I just got back from NO a day ago, and I'm not completely sober right now.

You need to go.

Just go. Don't wait for me to tell you the details. Just go. Spend your money. Leave big tips so you're not like the FEMA contractors.

Sunday morning, I took "the drive." Lakeview, Gentilly, NO East, down I-510 to Chalmette/St. Bernard, into the Lower 9. Just take the "Louisiana, 1927" song and replace "Evangeline" with "the Lower 9" and "Plaquemine." (I didn't do it first; Paul Sanchez of Cowboy Mouth did.) Oh, and throw in "Pontchartrain Park" too. That's where your busboys, your backup musicians lived. The backbone of what we fortunate tourists would call "N'Awlins." Seeing the devastation, they have no reason to come back. Yet they do. Half of the city. They know what it means.

Yes, there's wine to be sold there, and if we (and our distributor) have our way, a goodly bit of it will be Avondale chenin blanc. But the devastation is just amazing. Every house represents a family torn asunder. And it's not hard to drive past such houses for three or four hours. It weighs on the soul.

As for restaurants: one of my best mates, the mercurial Chris Ycaza (who took me on a bar-by-bar tour of his late childhood this past Sunday night), has moved from Cuvee to become GM of the national institution, Galatoire's' or, rather, the second most important job in the city. Go, go, go, especially if you like crabmeat. Cuvee's kitchen is going gangbusters; the front of the house, sans Ycaza and Kundinger, not so much.

Elizabeth's is singing for breakfast. Gene's Po-Boys doesn't have their homemade hot sausage back yet, but go there now so they'll have the money to have it soon. Parasol's and Domilise's are running on all cylinders in the po-boy department tho. The Upperline should get into the po-boy biz with their "Oysters St. Claude," fried perfectly with a dark, thick, garlic based sauce. So damn good, and JoAnn Clevenger is as much of a character as ever.

There's a new Argentinian-style steak joint called "La Boca" on Fulton St. near the convention center--it's worth your while, though stick to the lower end of the wine list. If chef/owner Adolfo Garcia is there (you can't miss him), tell him the crazy guy with the gruner eiswein says hello.

Please, please, please, you people. Go. Now. Stay at the Place d'Armes or some similar intimate inn. Drive through the devasted areas; it won't take much of a journey to get there. NOLA needs our love, our compassion, and our stinkin' huge tips. Now.

WHERE YOU AT?

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Just returned from 4 great days in New Orleans. Lots of food and drink, little sleep, and spending a small fortune, but worth every penny. Here is a quick rundown of the places I sampled.

Acme Oyster House

NOLA-Emerils place

Court of Two Sisters

Tujagues

Bourbon House

Cafe du Monde

Galatoires

Jacques-Imo's cafe

The Highlights - I was with a group of about 12 people who met down there to just party and have a good time. Two of the group are my best two friends from Dallas, the rest of the group were friends of theirs that I had never met, but after all the food and drinks, we have bonded and one stunning girl from the group is seriously making me contemplate moving to Dallas :) In any event, she is my date for my friends Charity Bll on New Years Eve....On to the food

Tujagues is the second oldest restaurant in N O. I joined 4 lovely ladies as the only lucky male in the group to be treated to a meal as the guests of the owner; Steve Latter. One of the girl's in the group is a travel writer and is doing a piece on N O and we were treated to a complimentary meal. WE started with The SIX COURSE TABLE D' Hote menu-

Shrimp Remoulade

Corn and Crab Soup

Crawfish Gumbo

Beef Brisket with creole sauce-served over bread with a spicy horseradish sauce-Unbelievable

A fish dish-sorry can't remember but was great

A Meat dish- Same as above, can't remember but think it was pork

As an added bonus, Steve served us a dish that is never printed on the menu, but can be verbally requested by those in the know :wub: It was a smothered/baked chicken pieces covered in potatoes, garlic and onion. This is not to be missed

Finished with bread pudding and pecan pie

NOLA

Stuffed chicken wings with hoisin dipping sauce

Wood oven roasted black mussels with chardonnay,

Roasted garlic-reggianno parm Bisque with basil pesto

Wood oven roasted veal chop with smothered collard green-potato gratin and tchoupitoulas sauce

White chocolate-bananas foster bread pudding

Galatoire's

Shrimp Gumbo

Oysters en Brochette

Poisson Meuniere Amandine-sauteed filet of Copia with brown butter, lemon and red wine vinegar

Jacques-Imo's Cafe

Shrimp and alligator cheese cake

Fried oysters

Amberjack Provencal

Shrimp etoufee

Cafe du Monde

Bengeits and the greatest Coke in the world(that morning)

Bourbon House

I will be honest, this place was not the greatest with regards to service and food quality. Gumbo and Po Boy was okay, bread is to die for, served in its own bag. Crowning achievment-7 different bourbons to make up for weak service and passable food. Its a pretty restaurant and huge as well, but the bourbons during lunch basically killed any brain cells I had for that day

Acme Oyster House

Always a line for this little place, but really feels like the tourist trap it is. Fried oyster/shrimp Po boy and gumbo just kinda there.. would not go back

Court of Two Sisters

An amazing courtyard to have the best Buffet Brunch I have had in a long time and a beautiful setting(especially when 2 separate tables of a bachelorette party and a wedding party made of over 20 smoking belle's are sitting on either side of you. The eggs benedict, and bacon was what I needed after drinking constantly for over 3 days.

I seriously have not drunk as much as i did since college, and I drank everything this weekend-beer, gin, vodka, hurricanes, tequila, wine, champagne and GOD help me....6 yeager bombs in a span of 20 minutes, but i will tell you that this was one of the best trips I have been on and the food was great. I had never been to New Orleans before, but will be going back. In closing, there is one totally fucked up event that took place in the Harrah's casino at 5:30 this morning and that was me placing 5 $500.00 Roulette spins, betting only on the colors, as I was high as a kite. The luck is back in NO becuase I hit each spin on the money-black,red,red,black,red and the 2500 i walked out with just covered the bill for the booze. :)

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Acme Oyster House

Always a line for this little place, but really feels like the tourist trap it is. Fried oyster/shrimp Po boy and gumbo just kinda there.. would not go back

Sadly, it's probably the best oyster or shrimp po-boy in the quarter (unless you count Praline Connection on Frenchmen as being in the Quarter).
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There and back in 30 hours. 12 spent driving. 7 spent sleeping. An all day meeting. All that left was a single freaking lunch that had to be quick and near the meeting location. Had a quick crawfish ettouffe. Not fabuous, but not bad. But sitting half in, half outside with the doors wide open on a gorgeous day was mighty nice. The view on the drive was heartbreaking.

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Is Uglesich still in business?

IIRC he went out of business and retired, by chance, just before the hurricane. I spoke to him briefly during his book signing in DC about the relative merits of Highlands as a retirement spot. He probably could afford it, unlike me.

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Sadly, it's probably the best oyster or shrimp po-boy in the quarter (unless you count Praline Connection on Frenchmen as being in the Quarter).

Hmmm - I've had some good ones from Deanie's at Dauphine and Iberville.

Not sure I've had oyster or shrimp at Johnny's on St. Louis St, I usually get roast beef or sausage, but I think they are excellent... and usually full of local workers and only an occasional tourist. 99% sure they've reopened.

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