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Cashion's Eat Place, Chef John Manolatos on Columbia Road in Adams Morgan - Closed


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[posted on eGullet 2003-2004]

For whatever reason, I hadn't been to Cashion's in about five years, and what I noticed most last night was how clean and tight everything was, without being ruined by the hamfisted saucing that is as much of a plague on society as is overuse of sourdough bread. The pork shoulder was beautifully presented in the form of a fajita, and could have actually used some sauce other than the pico de gallo.

Also, the cheese course featured an all-American cheese selection, and it was good although it would have been nice to see some more aging and color in the cheeses (there was a little pomegranate seed salad alongside). The nuts in the raisin-nut bread tasted somewhat rancid to me, though I don't know where they source their bread. Along with that chocolate brownie, we also had this blueberry compote stuff poured over ice cream - it sounds a bit simple but was really quite good.

The open-kitchen concept is okay, but when we were at the bar there were some less-than-savory aromas wafting in from the fryer.

I was strongly impressed with Cashion's last night, and I only wish it wasn't so difficult for me to get to or I'd be back there often. I'm sitting here ticking off the courses in my mind: the oysters (the portion size of this is too small), the sweetbreads, the elegantly reductive fritto misto, and most of all, the earth-shattering tortellini in Tuscan meat sauce. These are all really, really good dishes.

Cheers,
Rocks

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[posted on eGullet 2003-2004]

It seems fitting that my January, 2005 Restaurant Week would begin at Palena and end at Cashion's, two restaurants that did not participate but still turned out amazing meals at the same prices as those who did. Palena deservedly gets lots of attention on this forum, and I've often wondered why Cashion's doesn't get just as much. In fact, in terms of quality, price, and solid, innovative cooking rooted in tradition, I cannot think of any restaurant in Washington DC more comparable to Palena than Cashion's.

I'm convinced that Adams Morgan scares people away from Cashion's, and yet valet parking is only $5.00 at the restaurant, so that's no longer an acceptable excuse.

The wines at Cashion's are a strength, and you cannot possibly go wrong with a glass of 2000 Pommard from Voillot for $8.00 (they also have a bring-your-own corkage policy, although I don't remember how much they charge).

Look at this wonderful meal:

Ann's charcuterie plate is fascinating, consisting of a housemade rabbit terrine, a druggingly delicious turkey ballotine, and a little pile of nutmeg-y pork rillettes served with a deviled egg and fresh, interesting greens lightly bathed in truffle vinaigrette.

Three perfectly cooked pieces of crispy sauteed veal brains, served piping hot, are placed atop a refreshing frisée & salsify salad with an appropriately acidic lemon-caper dressing.

A half-avocado is hollowed and stuffed with tiny wedges of pink grapefruit, and makes a fine transition from savory into dessert.

And then the red wine pear sorbet, made in-house, is one of the most important sorbets in the area. Served at the correct temperature, it comes across as vinous, granular, complex and even whimsical, as it's accompanied by a saxaphone-shaped sugar cookie with "Cashion's" scripted into it.

Every one of these plates is between $8 and $11, and if you're going for the first time, please don't forget the mind-bending spinach and ricotta ravioli with Tuscan meat sauce.

All this, plus one of the singularly great pieces of bar art in all the world. You'll just have to go for yourself to have a look, and when you do, you'll probably see Ann as well, working away in the kitchen of this wonderful restaurant - one of the best places to enjoy a meal in all of Washington DC.

Cheers,
Rocks.

P.S. I also had Sunday brunch at Cashion's a few weeks ago, and it's one of the best casual brunches in town. Not inexpensive, but

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Since Cashion's is only a couple blocks away from us, it became our go-to place for special occasions soon after it opened. It's been a while since we've eaten there, however. My husband had the sweetbreads and they were simply fried and left raw in the middle :lol: . I don't think that's how they are supposed to be prepared. The rest of the meal was simply mediocre. I figured it was just another restaraunt resting on its laurels. And, we really objected to wine being served in a tumbler, although the food was usually good enough to overlook that. Until that last meal.

As far as people being "afraid" to come to Adams Morgan, all I can say is that this neighborhood gets absolutely packed on the weekends. Parking is always a problem, but it is easy to get to using public transportation. But then, I don't consider Cashion's to be a "destination" restaurant.

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Since Cashion's is only a couple blocks away from us, it became our go-to place for special occasions soon after it opened. It's been a while since we've eaten there, however. My husband had the sweetbreads and they were simply fried and left raw in the middle mad.gif . I don't think that's how they are supposed to be prepared. The rest of the meal was simply mediocre. I figured it was just another restaraunt resting on its laurels.

 
Oh that's too bad. I loved Cashion's when we lived closer, but I agree with your assessment of "not a destination restaurant" - for us because of the parking in Adam's Morgan. Not worth the hassle when there are plenty of other good and easier to get to places in town.

And, we really objected to wine being served in a tumbler, although the food was usually good enough to overlook that.

 
Yikes. Better not come to our house then. That's all I use anymore.

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i popped into the bar at cashion's last night for a late evening snack and had a brief but delightful experience. i tucked myself into the corner of the rather crowded bar and started with a very deftly made manhattan. feeling peckish rather than full-on hungry, i had the sweetbreads. i hadn't read barbara's post that mentioned her unfortunate experience with this dish during her april visit. whether her sweetbreads were prepared on an "off-night", or mine were atypically good, i cannot say. but i can tell you that mine were superb.

the sweetbreads were lightly fried with just a gently crispness to the crust, and were moist and delicious inside. they were served in a bowl with sauteed spinach, diced apples, and black currents. the flavor combination was a sublime balm for my pallatte.

the bar staff, always the strength of the service team at cashion's imho, was professional, knowledgeable, and exceedingly freindly. thank you billy and george.

in the interest of full disclosure, i should note that i have long been freinds with ann cashion, and many members of her delightful staff.

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i was in a pretty crappy mood yesterday - seems to happen whenever corporate people get too involved in my day rather than watching from the appropriate distance as i run the restaurant. rather than inflict my crappy mood on either my staff or our guests, i made the executive decision to get the hell out and have a working dinner at cashion's last night. i was in a mood for that which would comfort and soothe. cashion's satisfied on every level.

the comfort started with having to run into the bar to get change to pay my cab driver. before i returned, billy, the ever capable mainstay of cashion's bar staff, without needing to ask had a manhattan sitting in front of my bar stool. places where "everybody knows your name" are nice. places where the bartender knows your drink - invaluable.

eventually i got to the menu. i decided to start with the roasted quail. it was served atop a chanterelle and garlic risotto that was finished with truffle oil. this dish was simply sublime. the quail was seasoned very simply with salt and pepper which truly allowed the flavors of the bird to shine. the risotto was deftly executed with just the right amount of bite to the rice. the garlic was just a shade more than subtle and well shy of overpowering. it was, however, the truffle oil acting as the key thread that tied all of the flavors together. at billy's suggestion, i paired the quail with a sauncere. everything was so harmonious that i neglected to remember the vineyard.

i had the hanger steak with blue potatoes and roasted cauliflower as an entree. it was good, very good even. but were i to replay the evening, i would have had another order of the quail.

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Had a light dinner at the bar at Cashion's Friday night, needing somewhere that would get me out of the rain yet let me stay close to home. It was just the right spot: warm, welcoming, and not as smoky as I feared it might be. You just never know with bar dining.

Billy is indeed a find, and while I was surprised to see red (Malbec, in this case) served in such small glasses, the pour was not too scant. Went nicely with the vegetable fritto misto, which was served in a spicy red sauce. I couldn't quite tell if my mouth was burning because a) the sauce was too hot, B) the sauce was too salty, or c) just because my mouth was still tender from an overly crusty bread experience from the day before. Anyway, nicely breaded-up veggies, including one of the city's best fried green tomatoes.

Then: ah, the cheese plate. Five delightful choices for $9.50, served with a couple of really nice jammy fruit accompaniments, probably a membrillo and something else. Chimay, Rogue River blue, and three others, all good. The crowning touch was the raisin walnut bread, served toasty warm, just the right texture and temperature to bring out the flavor of the cheese.

Not exactly a neighborhood restaurant, thanks to the prices, but still a nice restaurant to have in the neighborhood.

Edited by jm chen
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let me be really clear about this...

i am in the tank for ann, johnny, and the whole cashion's crew. the service at the bar is the best i get anywhere in the city, the decor whispers in my ear, and the food has never disappointed me.

there. i said it. my bias is on the record. so you are going to have rely solely on my word when i say that i had an extroidinary experience at cashion's last night. i frequent the bar there because it is one of the few places that serve really good food after 10pm during the week. and of course, because i am in the tank for the place.

last night the belly salmon tartar with the baby arugla salad knocked my socks off. i have always felt that tartar was primarily about the quality of the meat or fish used and that it rarely was a true demonstration of a chef's skill. this dish made it quite clear that the line of thought was moronic. the salmon, sliken and rich, was strung together with a very light sauce of truffle oil, salt, and pepper. the baby aruglua topped the generous 3inch disc of salmon. the plate was finished with a sauce that i remember being great but not the details.

i had a very nice entree, but it couldn't touch the salmon. like many places the, apps are the strength of cashion's menu. one of these days, i am going to learn my lesson and just do 3apps instead of the usual app, entree, bourbon format.

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I've gotta say, I've always enjoyed Cashions, though I haven't eaten there in about a year.

I haven't eaten there in about ... twenty hours. My advice right now is: down the rabbit, whole. Served slathered in a spicy salsa with rice ($20).

Cheers,

Rocks

P.S. Welcome Antonio!

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We went there for amateur night last week. As I would have expected, it was pretty low key and the food was great. We sat at the bar and were taken care of by Billy. Had the bison and the pan roasted cod with oysters and caviar. The butter cream heart cookies were ridiculously delicious. On a separate note, I just saw the Elvis photos by the bathrooms-- I guess Johnny's aunt used to be his PR person when he was really young? They're fun.

When I go with my husband, I always hope he can talk to Ann; he's from Greenville, Mississippi, home of the Doe's Eat Place, the original "eat place". Hasn't happened yet and don't know how tied she is to MS anymore, anyway. Will, on the other hand, can't get enough of it: the sweet tea, the tamales, and southern cookin with lots of lard (;.

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i had a very nice entree, but it couldn't touch the salmon.  like many places the,  apps are the strength of cashion's menu.  one of these days, i am going to learn my lesson and just do 3apps instead of the usual app, entree, bourbon format.

This is exactly what I did (on the same night you were there, actually!). Ravioli with Tuscan meat sauce, wild mushrooms on a polenta cake, and gumbo (in order of preference). I'm also convinced this is the way to go (though I'm now wishing I'd tried the salmon). But even with my voracious appetite, it turned out that 3 apps was a bit too much for me.

I love having this place a block away from home.

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I haven't eaten there in about ... twenty hours.  My advice right now is:  down the rabbit, whole.  Served slathered in a spicy salsa with rice ($20).

Cheers,

Rocks

P.S. Welcome Antonio!

I had my first rabbit ever there a few weeks ago. Suddenly, I see Elmer Fudd's side of the issue.

And maybe now I know what I'm having for dinner tonight...

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I had a delicious (and drunken) meal at the bar at Cashion's Friday night. At the end of it, I asked the delightful barkeep Bill to write down the description of my entree because I liked it so much. This is his note verbatim.

Lamb keftedes (Greek meatballs) in a tomato-red wine sauce served w/ yoghurt dill drizzle & a spinach-basmati pilaf.  Only $19.00!  And Billy's wine pairing, service & good time was money, baby...money!!

He is a charmer, that Billy. The keftedes is a large portion. I am usually a plate cleaner if I enjoy something, but when I couldn't eat anymore, there were still two or three of the oblong meatballs on the plate. If I hadn't been heading out for yet-more drinks, I surely would have taken the rest home for later.

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I had a wonderful meal at Cashion's last night. The service, wine, and atmosphere was, as always, great. So was the food, but most of it was overshadowed by our first appetizer, truffled beef ravioli. Songs should be written about this dish, people. It was amazing, delicious, totally off the hook. The pasta was perfectly tender, the beef was soft and seasoned, and the truffle cream sauce was just ridiculous. I've only experienced this a few times in my life, but I very nearly put my fork down after the first bite and declared myself done. What more satisfaction canst thou have tonight??

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Despite spending a fair amount of time in that area of Adams Morgan, I had never gone (or even thought of going) to Cashion's until last night. A couple friends and I had an extensive meal that was very very good. The play-by-play follows, but forgive me for forgetting the details of what each dish was called:

split a couple appetizers:

lamb short ribs (not sure if that's right): good but nothing to write home about

exotic mushrooms with cornmeal cake (not sure that's exactly right): almost stole the entire show. incredibly tasty, perfect balance, and the texture of the cornmeal thing was excellent: soft and creamy inside, lightly seared and crispy on the outside. a delight.

new orleans filé gumbo: moderately spicy, with good chunks of seafood. please sir, may i have some more?

hanger steak with broccoli and potatoes au gratin: the hanger steak was amazing. perfectly cooked to medium rare, and an absolute delight. The broccoli was a complete afterthought, but the potatoes weren't bad. Just hard to stand up to such a beautiful steak.

cheese plate - some very good cheese, a nice way to wrap up the meal

port - i don't remember what kind it was, but they only had one on offer, and it was very disappointing. I really like a glass of port, especially with a cheese plate, and what we got was a thin, overly-boozy version.

All in all, a top-notch meal. The steak and the mushroom appetizer were the highlights, but everything was well-executed and the service was impeccable. Now, if only the beer selection wasn't so terrible (no draft lines, 4 in bottles: bud, heineken, amstel light, and redhook ESB, the only acceptable choice)...

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The rumors about an impending - or perhaps even completed - sale here are becoming credible. Can anyone confirm?

Cheers,

Rocks.

Could this be the "big name chef leaving" news that Sietsema has been hinting about in his chat for a month?

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Could this be the "big name chef leaving" news that Sietsema has been hinting about in his chat for a month?

No, no, no. Just last night I saw a large "Restaurant Lease" sign on the Childe Harold. I'm sure this is what Tom has been hinting at. What place could possibly be more beloved than the Childe?

( :lol: )

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Saturday at Cashion's I asked about the rumors. I was not given a completely direct answer about a sale but was told that they were not closing. We had an early dinner with great service by George at the bar. They had steaks of various cuts on the menu which seemed unusual for Cashions so we decided to give it a try. The offered a strip, Delmonico, porterhouse and ribeye. The porterhouse and ribeye we were told could be shared. We ended up with the Delmonico. We ordered medium rare but the steaks were almost raw in places and were so difficult to cut we finally gave up. The people next to us with a strip and the ribeye had the same problem. We didn't complain (I know, we should have). Our bottle of wine, Frog Leap 04 Red Zin was very good. Desert was a shared ginger cake that was delicious. We took most of our steak home and fed the dog. It was our first disappointing meal at Cashions

By the way Geroge will be out for a while for hip surgery. Best wishes for a quick recovery.

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My last two meals at Cashion's have been *sigh* lame. I keep going back trying to recreate the "wow!" meal described upthread, but the two recent experiences have really missed the mark. And the total price of the meal (with a good deal of wine by the glass) makes it a bit unpleasant for me, who is trying to sock away some cash. YMMV.

My friend and I dined at the bar, chosing to share an appetizer of tubetti pasta al forno with bechamel, braised beef and pork. The portion was on the large size of moderate and it's a rich dish so sharing was a good thing. Reminiscent of Dino's lasagnette, it's a hearty, tasty thing; not delicate or thought provoking. We sent the dish back to the kitchen wiped clean.

My friend ordered the steelhead (described as a hybrid between salmon and trout) and at Billy's suggestion, I ordered the braised lamb dish. We were both underwhelmed and of the two of us, I was the more disappointed of the two of us. Although the grilled haricot verts were fabulous--it was at Cashion's that I decided French green beans are one of my favorite vegetables (and I'm really no lover of vegetables)--and the sweet potato ginger gratin was ok, the lamb was awful. I tried to decide if it was simply not to my taste or what and decided that "no, this really isn't good." It was tough and the preparation was just too sweet. As it cooled, the meat became tougher and the sauce grew increasingly cloying.

I wish I had said something, but in the close quarters of the bar, I felt awkward about it. Plus Billy himself had highly recommended the dish. My choice not to say anything (although I do wish someone had asked about the pile of meat I left on the plate), my fault.

Our dessert, chosen by my friend, was vanilla ice cream with hot fudge. It was fine.

When Cashion's is good, it's incredibly good. But order badly and make the mistake of not speaking up, and feel poorer and a bit sad the next day.

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The rumors about an impending - or perhaps even completed - sale here are becoming credible. Can anyone confirm?

Cheers,

Rocks.

The sale rumor is back in full force. Word is that the current chef will be buying the place with his brother who will come over from Johnny's to bartend. Anyone able to confirm?

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The sale rumor is back in full force. Word is that the current chef will be buying the place with his brother who will come over from Johnny's to bartend. Anyone able to confirm?

This is a pro-active non-response. ;)

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The sale rumor is back in full force. Word is that the current chef will be buying the place with his brother who will come over from Johnny's to bartend. Anyone able to confirm?

Why is it rumored to be up for sale? Any real reasons?

I have to admit, my wife and I haven't been there in years having moved on over to other favorites. Parking there was always a bitch, so we always used the valet, which often was a bitch to use, too, to tell you the truth.

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Why is it rumored to be up for sale? Any real reasons?

Probably because Anne is running a vastly larger operation with Johnny's and the Tacqueria on the Hill and -- as she doesn't seem to be one to delegate promiscuously -- she needs to get one place into good hands so that she can devote her time to the other and maybe sleep and hang out with her buds on occasion.

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The sale rumor is back in full force. Word is that the current chef will be buying the place with his brother who will come over from Johnny's to bartend. Anyone able to confirm?

You'll know tomorrow.

If I broke all the news that I know, there wouldn't be much news left to break.

Rocks.

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From Tomchat:

Tom Sietsema: IT'S (FINALLY) OFFICIAL: The owners of Cashion�s Eat Place (1819 Columbia Road NW) -- chef Ann Cashion and business partner John Fulchino -- are planning to sell their popular restaurant in Adams Morgan in order to focus on Johnny's Half Shell, the seafood restaurant they relocated from Dupont Circle to Capitol Hill (400 N. Capitol St. NW) last year.

According to Fulchino, the "new" Johnny's was taking up a lot of the restaurateurs� time, and neither he nor Cashion desired to be absentee owners at Cashion's Eat Place. (Following the success of Taqueria Nacionale, adjacent to Johnny's, they are also looking to open a second such taco joint in the city.)

Regulars of the 12-year-old contemporary American restaurant should be relieved to know that the next owner (the parties go into settlement this afternoon) is John Manolatos � Cashion's sous chef for the entire life span of the restaurant bearing her name.

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How is Cashion’s since it has changed hands?

I have eaten at Cashion’s at least three times since the sale was finalized; last night was my most recent visit. I giddily report that the most often good, occasionally brilliant, cuisine is still a standard bearer for this class of restaurant. Which is to say that it remains a great neighborhood restaurant that is worthy of destination status when one is in the mood for soulful, lusty, unpretentious, yet high-end American cuisine with a southern (and now Mediterranean too) influence.

I sat in the dining room last night, and I never sit at a table I always prefer the bar. Our server, Nicole, was great – one of the best I have ever seen, actually. With her warmth, knowledge of the menu and wine list, and overall demeanor, she has the ability to elevate an experience just by showing up.

We started with the grilled octopus and heirloom tomato salad. The octopus was served atop a toasted crostini and dressed with a tomato and basil salad that was dotted with chickpeas. The thickness of the bread made it difficult to eat with a knife and fork, but all of the flavors were there and focused. This dish was well worth the effort to put the pieces together. The caprése salad was the best I have had all season. Gorgeous tomatoes of varying hues, fresh mozz, olive oil, and a light touch with maladon (sp?) salt.

My dining companion had the roasted halibut – I would love to describe it but it disappeared too quickly for me to say anything other than it was pretty. I was told that it was quite good. I had the bison rib-eye and I lack the appropriate vocabulary to describe how good it was. Tender, meaty, juicy, perfect were the only words I could mumble at the time.

All of this washed down with a 2003 Martin Michele Grand Cru, and 2001 Yarra Yerring Pinot Noir.

p.s. there have been three substantial changes since the sale:

1 – Good wine glasses for those ordering by the bottle,

2 - Cashion’s is now on OpenTable.,

3 – Late Night Menu available after midnight (I think) on Friday and Saturday; despite being open late on those nights and being in Adams Morgan, the bar is still a place for grown-ups.

eta: my previously disclosed bias for Cashion's

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Why in the world would a vegetable-phobe order a soup described as containing the puree of kale, turnip greens, mustard greens and probably even more green stuff? She would do so because the soup, caldo verde, was highly recommended by the lovely and talented barman Billy. I didn't just eat my vegetables, I thoroughly enjoyed them. With chicken stock as a base, this wonderful winter creation is rich with garlic and flecked with fatty bits of ham and garlic croutons. I was so happy I didn't order the salad I had considered before deciding on the soup.

My friend's goat cheese and leek tart was also very compelling, if seriously rich. Upon ordering the dish, Billy noted that the tart was NOT vegetarian and contained bits of ham. For us, this was a plus, but I have to wonder if the rest of the staff is as diligent about pointing this out (pork isn't noted on the menu). The tart arrives, looking petite and demure, but the rich goat cheese and buttery pastry crust packs a wallop. The small pile of greens that accompanies the tart is a welcome foil for the lusciousness of the cheese, ham and pastry.

For our mains, we ordered the seared tuna (my friend) and the veal cheek confit. My first bite made me swoon (perhaps a bit too loudly--apologies to the neighbors). What's a synonym for rich? Screw it, the veal and its accompanying lentils were richly fantastic. I loved the bit of frisee on top.

We shared a half bottle of Champagne (Taittenger...something or other), but were too full for dessert this visit. My share of the bill including 20% tip was $72 and worth every damn penny.

Two or three weeks ago, I visited Cashion's with two friends, eating in the dining room. Although some of the details have faded, we left feeling that same sense of "wow, that was GOOD."

I have previously described Cashion's as potentially an expensive mistake, something that doesn't hold true based on my last two visit. It's just two meals I'm writing about now, but they give me lots of hope that Cashion's is heading in a great direction.

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Heading to Cashions tonight!!! YAY!!! Anything that I can't miss? It's been over a year since my last visit...

We were there last week and enjoyed the Sweetbread app, the Squab (with Foie gras) and the bison ribeye. It had been a while for us too....Adams Morgan not in our rotation much these days.

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Two finals in a row today, and I was beat. Fortunately, Cashion's found room to add us to the parents' table. Justin brought me a wine- no idea what it was but it was entirely drinkable. "What do you want to drink?" "I'm sorry, I didn't study for that." "Right. You need a drink. I'll be right back." The spicy tomatillo soup with feta _was_ spicy, and I barely restrained myself from licking the bowl. Accolades from all around; fortunately, no one else had a spoon so they could only get tastes with a fork. (Lucky for them, really, because I was willing to stab someone to defend it.)

Nick had the goat cheese souffle; fortunately the order went in early enough that we weren't waiting all evening for it. The stand-out entree had to be the pork chop, though the dorade was tasty. The guinea hen prompted a discussion and a googling of the difference between cornish hens and guinea hens, and was nicely salted. My cod on risotto with ramps and morels and peas was somewhat light fare, and couldn't match the depth of flavour of my soup, but was still good. Besides, it left room for dessert. We'd already decided on dessert when we walked in– ice-cream sandwiches made with waffles. Damn good waffles.

Justin laughed at us. "If you eat it with your hands, I'll buy it for you."

Katherine and I just looked at each other. Hell, I was willing to lick it out of the bowl, but prudently I didn't admit to it.

We did, and he did, and a comp'd dessert never tasted so good.

Cashions may in fact be tumbling Coppis from my designated "neighborhood restaurant" spot. Hrmm. I should go back to Coppis soon. Can't I have *two* favorite neighborhood restaurants?

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Better late than never?

I've been remiss in posting about a dinner I had at Cashion's a few weeks ago. I had only been to visit once before since the change of ownership, and was nervous about this restaurant I've loved for a decade turning into something I couldn't recognize.

Fears allayed. COMPLETELY.

The food was good. Unfortunately, since it's been a few weeks, I only remember a few things, but I do know this: the app Greek dips on offer were excellent; and the vegetarian (who only announced her vegetarianism when ordering, to the waitress) (ack!) was served a dish about which she said, "If I could eat this for every meal, I would."

But what I remember most was the service, which if anything, has gotten even better.

I originally made a reservation for six (not knowing of the veggie!). All but one of the guests were from out of town, and I don't know any of them well. But at some point, apparently, a person in my party called, saying she was me, and changed the ressie to eight. And then we got there, and all but me were late, and then nine showed up.

Mortification!

---Except! our amazing server (the French woman whose name escapes me), despite the restaurant being full, stepped in with no visible concern or distress, and added enough seats onto our table to make us all more than comfortable. I don't know where she got them or what crap the host had to go through to accommodate us, but that was the point, right?

Our crowd ended up being precocious, difficult, and quite drunk by the end of the night, but our server could not have treated us with more grace, hospitality, and professionalism than she did. I didn't know the folks I was dining with well, and I had recommended the restaurant to them, so I felt responsible for the evening. And every one of them, to a woman, was skeptical to start and ended up praising it at the end. "Next time we're in town, we're coming back HERE."

(This may be fodder for another thread, but they may come back here, so what do you do when you find yourself at a table you know has become a nightmare for staff yet you can do nothing to control it???)

In a city where service is a regular complaint, I can't say enough for the personal--and indulgent--service provided to my crowd at Cashion's. If my experience is any measure, guest comfort seems to clearly be a priority for Cashion's new owners. I'm so glad that they're going to continue to be my Fancy Neighborhood Joint.

Yay!

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what do you do when you find yourself at a table you know has become a nightmare for staff yet you can do nothing to control it???

Big tip. Really big tip. When friends are outside, an apology and grateful thanks directly to the waitress.

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had a WONDERFUL dinner there on Saturday. Roger Troutman had the bison ribeye which was exceptional and I had the over the top duck with 2oz of foie gras and rubarb. I can honestly say that it is the best dish that I have ever had in DC. ever. we finished the meal with the waffle ice cream sandwhich with blueberry ice cream and chocolate sauce.

The service was lovely and I especially love watching the cooks in the open kictchen. I feel like I am watching a live version of Top Chef.

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Someone recently asked me what "are my favorite restaurants." I hate that question. I think it so overly broad it thoroughly lacks meaning or context. If the question had come from someone other than the smoking hot red head that asked, I would have delivered some pedantic and dismissive quip about the question rather than my contextual responses. When I got to Cashion’s on my list, I indicated that it is my favorite place to go after a craptacular day and I am in need of a culinary hug.

I needed a hug on Saturday night. Cashion's delivered as it almost always does. I had the Bigeye tuna carpaccio; she crab soup, and softshell crab. I could describe the dishes, as they were all fantastic, but the menu changes so often that I think it more relevant to discuss the spirit of the menu.

It was egoless cooking. In an era where so many chefs present "thier take" on [insert name of classic dish], John Manolatos sources great ingredients, butchers with great care and precision, works with his staff to ensure consistent execution, and gets out of the way. This is not to suggest he lacks creativity. He is one of the more creative chefs in town when he "creates" a dish. On that particular Saturday night, I am glad that he made me the best she crab soup I have had in DC, rather than giving me his "take" on it. I got the hug.

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