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The Michelin Guide


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Here is the list:

MICHELIN RESTAURANT RATINGS

ONE STAR (*)

ESTABLISHMENT BOROUGH NEIGHBORHOOD

Annisa Manhattan West Village

Aureole Manhattan Upper East Side

Babbo Manhattan Greenwich Village

BLT Fish Manhattan Union Square

Café Boulud Manhattan Upper East Side

Café Gray Manhattan Midtown West

Craft Manhattan Gramercy-Flatiron

Cru Manhattan Greenwich

Etats-Unis Manhattan Upper East Side

Fiamma Osteria Manhattan SoHo

Fleur de Sel Manhattan Gramercy-Flatiron

Gotham Bar and Grill Manhattan Greenwich Village

Gramercy Tavern Manhattan Gramercy-Flatiron

JoJo Manhattan Upper East Side

Jewel Bako Manhattan East Village

La Goulue Manhattan Upper East Side

Lever House Manhattan Midtown East

Lo Scalco Manhattan TriBeCa

March Manhattan Midtown East

Nobu Manhattan TriBeCa

Oceana Manhattan Midtown East

Peter Luger Brooklyn

Picholine Manhattan Upper West Side

Saul Brooklyn

Scalini Fedeli Manhattan TriBeCa

Spotted Pig Manhattan Greenwich Village

The Modern Manhattan Midtown West

Veritas Manhattan Gramercy-Flatiron

Vong Manhattan Midtown East

Wallsé Manhattan West Village

WD-50 Manhattan Lower East Side

TWO STARS (**)

ESTABLISHMENT BOROUGH NEIGHBORHOOD

Bouley Manhattan TriBeCa

Daniel Manhattan Upper East Side

Danube Manhattan TriBeCa

Masa Manhattan Midtown West

THREE STARS (***)

ESTABLISHMENT BOROUGH NEIGHBORHOOD

Alain Ducasse Manhattan Midtown West

Jean-Georges Manhattan Upper West Side

Le Bernardin Manhattan Midtown West

Per Se Manhattan Midtown West

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Curious how most of the one and two stars are downtown, and the three stars are all within a few blocks of each other. Other than outlier Le Bernardin, I think they are all within two blocks of Columbus Circle.

I'm really glad to see Scalini Fedeli get a star. Nobody ever seems to talk much about it, perhaps because they started in New Jersey before taking over the original Bouley space. But for French-leaning northern Italian it's really hard to beat.

Edited by vengroff
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Shouldn't this be a separate topic? Burying it inside of a general thread on New York does not seem like a way to attract a lot of interest to Michelin's first ever rating of American restaurants. Four American restaurants receiving three Michelin stars is worthy of its own topic. Huge implications for D. C. Especially Maestro, Citronelle, The Inn and Laboratorio, possibly CityZen. I realize the philosophy of this board is to have one continuous thread about a very general topic but I think this merits its own thread. I am just certain that a lot of people who typically would not read out of town posts will have an opinion r comment on this.

From the Times article: "Mario Batali, whose restaurant, Babbo, received one star, doesn't think the guide will get much traction with New Yorkers. He was not happy with his ranking, which put him on the same level with the Spotted Pig, a small gastro-pub in the Village."

Shades of Gayot/Gault-Millau!

Edited by Joe H
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From the Times article:  "Mario Batali, whose restaurant, Babbo, received one star, doesn't think the guide will get much traction with New Yorkers. He was not happy with his ranking, which put him on the same level with the Spotted Pig, a small gastro-pub in the Village."

Shades of Gayot/Gault-Millau!

Having had a very nice meal at Babbo, I can tell you it is a 1 star restaurant. The single floret recognizes how good the food is, and no other florets denotes how much the non-food dining experience sucks. If he wants another star he might consider putting in some carpet, or doing something else to dampen the noise.

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Having had a very nice meal at Babbo, I can tell you it is a 1 star restaurant.  The single floret recognizes how good the food is, and no other florets denotes how much the non-food dining experience sucks.  If he wants another star he might consider putting in some carpet, or doing something else to dampen the noise.

Maybe based on the traditional European sense of the Michelin stars, but compared to other restaurants in the one star grouping on the New York list, Babbo is a step above most in terms of the actual food, and the upstairs dining room has a different, less hectic feel.

Disclaimer - I've not dined in many of the restaurants on the NY list and have not been to Europe, so take my statements here with a grain of salt.

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Maybe based on the traditional European sense of the Michelin stars,

We can stop right there. The Michelin list is based solely on the traditional French measures. This is not limited only to food, but also rates the service, and the look and feel of the restaurant.

With those measures, food only gets you so far. If they offered half florets, then Babbo might be at 1 1/2, but the room and service at this restaurant will keep it from receiving two. I would say the same for a number of the other 1 stars, they offer superlative food, in less than ideal environs. What I think might be lost on Mr. Batali is that the Michelin adage is that one star means that a restaurant has exceptional cooking, 2 stars mean that the restaurant is "worth a detour" and 3 stars mean that it is "worth a special trip". Based on this definition, I would say that Babbo and the other one stars are fairly judged.

Edited by Sthitch
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Curious how most of the one and two stars are downtown, and the three stars are all within a few blocks of each other.  Other than outlier Le Bernardin, I think they are all within two blocks of Columbus Circle.

I'm really glad to see Scalini Fedeli get a star.  Nobody ever seems to talk much about it, perhaps because they started in New Jersey before taking over the original Bouley space.  But for French-leaning northern Italian it's really hard to beat.

Ditto on Scalini Fedeli. Just a great spot. Last time I was there, Roberto Donna was in the dining room as well.

Another spot on that list that most might not be familiar with is Etats-Unis. A great neighborhood spot on the UES that serves two great menus, on across the street at it's bar.

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What I think might be lost on Mr. Batali is that the Michelin adage is that one star means that a restaurant has exceptional cooking, 2 stars mean that the restaurant is "worth a detour" and 3 stars mean that it is "worth a special trip".  Based on this definition, I would say that Babbo and the other one stars are fairly judged.

i think the idea of "1 star" being excellent, in the michelin sense, is lost on most americans; not just batali. many people i habe talked to that have been to starred restaurants in europe have said they have had their best meals in 1 or 2 star joints, because the 3 star joints, and to a lesser extent, the 2 star joints are worrying more about fax lines in rooms, and a parlor where a guest can use a phone.

there are many restaurants in new york that didnt even get a star...so 1 star is an accomplishement.

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NY Times article on Michelin's third annual New York City restaurant ratings
Well, no argument from me on the ***'s, except that I believe Masa to be a *** experience. The list in its totality is pretty disappointing, though. No Eleven Madison Park, period? Peter Luger still gets a star? Spotted Pig? I think Grub Street said it best this year - "denying Esca a star is like printing Made in Seacaucus on the cover". Congrats to Etas Unis and A Voce, however.

Ed Levine's take on Michelin 2008

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Well, no argument from me on the ***'s, except that I believe Masa to be a *** experience.

FWIW, I had lunch at Le Bernardin yesterday. Service, wine, and freshness of ingredients were impressive; the execution and orchestration, mostly "flawless" on paper, but very redundant and somewhat boring. While a lunch on Columbus Day is hardly much of a data point (Ripert absent, Marino no longer there, new Chef de Cuisine probably off), this one visit didn't add up to three stars.

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A surprise about Ramsay's, should get one more starsky. And too bad about Fiamma :blink: Gramercy is one of best lunches in town, personal thought. Wd-50 is amazing, but guess the service is too quirky, kind of like Alinea; amazing food, and experience, but need a few more Pro's handling the engaging part of the meal

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They are out again...

2009 Michelin Guide NYC

3 STARS

Jean Georges

Le Bernardin

Masa

Per Se

2 STARS

Adour

Daniel

Del Posto

Gilt

Gordon Ramsay

Momofuku Ko

Picholine

1 STAR

Allen & Delancey

Alto

Annisa

Anthos

Aureole

Blue Hill

Cafe Boulud

Cru

Dressler

81

Etats unis

Fiamma

Fleur de Sel

Gotham Bar and Grill

Grammercy Tavern

Insieme

Jewel Bako

JoJo

Kyo Ya

Robuchon

Modern

Oceana

Perry Street

Peter Luger

Public

Saul

Spotted Pig

Sushi of Gari

Veritas

Wallse

wd-50

Thoughts? IMO, Eleven Madison Park not receiving a star (or two!) is a travesty.

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Though I am devoted to Michelin when wandering abroad, I have to wonder who, in America, gives more credibility to Michelin than to the NYT (even with the Bruni-haters out there).

On the other hand, the cheap dollar appears to be bringing hordes of the foreigns to our shores, it's probable that they go with the guide they know.

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Not to mention no Craft, Hearth, or Babbo.
Craft and Babbo lost their stars this year, along with A Voce, and probably some others that I can't remember. Honestly, I don't think Craft, at least the meal that I had there two weeks ago, deserves a star. I think you have a point with Hearth, though.

To waitman's point, I think that the NYT ratings carry far more weight than guide michelin right now, foreign tourists excepted.

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I think the Babbo & Craft demotions were well deserved. Craft lost theirs last year. How Del Post gets two but EMP doesn't even rate one is beyond me.

Did everyone notice that Maestro gets one star? I logged on expecting to see some ranting about that.

The Momofuku Ko rating is dead on, but I was surprised to see they demoted Bouley & Devi.

There are some really odd choices at the one star level, I would take at least half of them away.

The idea that the Robuchon place is at the same level as almost any of the one stars (Blue Hill excepted) is really funny.

To respond to waitman above I think this list is about as good as any, you could waste A LOT of money going to places that Bruni gave 3 stars to. That said there probably isn't a really reliable list. I guess I think that Kliman or Siestema are more reliable than Bruni or the red guide.

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I think the Babbo & Craft demotions were well deserved. Craft lost theirs last year. How Del Post gets two but EMP doesn't even rate one is beyond me.

Did everyone notice that Maestro gets one star? I logged on expecting to see some ranting about that.

The Momofuku Ko rating is dead on, but I was surprised to see they demoted Bouley & Devi.

There are some really odd choices at the one star level, I would take at least half of them away.

The idea that the Robuchon place is at the same level as almost any of the one stars (Blue Hill excepted) is really funny.

To respond to waitman above I think this list is about as good as any, you could waste A LOT of money going to places that Bruni gave 3 stars to. That said there probably isn't a really reliable list. I guess I think that Kliman or Siestema are more reliable than Bruni or the red guide.

I think that Bouley and Daniel were likely demoted because they were both closed for a period of time this year while being renovated / moved (in Bouley's case)
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I was surprised to see they demoted Bouley & Devi.

After my meal earlier this year at Devi, I am in no way surprised that it was dropped off the list.

It seems that most people don't understand that great food still only gets you one floret, service gets the 2nd, and the ambiance gets the 3rd. Robuchon's place could have the best food in New York, but if the service sucks or even if it is not up to the standards sought by Michelin it will never get a second floret.

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After my meal earlier this year at Devi, I am in no way surprised that it was dropped off the list.

It seems that most people don't understand that great food still only gets you one floret, service gets the 2nd, and the ambiance gets the 3rd. Robuchon's place could have the best food in New York, but if the service sucks or even if it is not up to the standards sought by Michelin it will never get a second floret.

Even though I agree as there are many examples. Michelin claims not.

http://www.michelinguide.com/us/ratings.html

The A Voce demotion is likely due to Andrew Carmellini leaving.

EMP being omitted again this year is baffling.

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It seems that most people don't understand that great food still only gets you one floret, service gets the 2nd, and the ambiance gets the 3rd. Robuchon's place could have the best food in New York, but if the service sucks or even if it is not up to the standards sought by Michelin it will never get a second floret.

The fact that Momofuku Ko has two shows that this can't be true, and a lot of the one stars don't have first rate food food.

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I'm not a Michelin expert by any means, so please factor that in as you read this. However, I just wanted to say that my favorite restaurant on the list (as a sushi fiend) is Jewel Bako. It's such a beautifully decorated space and the limited number of seats ensures that you get exceptional, graceful service every time (or at least I have). And of course, the food is exquisite. I don't know if it's been on the list before, but I'm pleased to see it there now.

Oh, and last time I went I sat next to the Counting Crows. :lol:

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The New Yorker had any interesting opportunity to eat with and interview a Michelin inspector in New York City.

We had dinner two weeks ago at the three Michelin star Joel Robuchon in Las Vegas. My only comment is that three Michelin stars in Las Vegas and three Michelin stars in Italy/France/Spain/Germany/etc. are two entirely different experiences. I have wondered how many of the Michelin "inspectors" in the U. S. have had the fortunate experience to dine in Michelin starred restaurants in Europe to fully understand what is necessary for a fair comparison? Robuchon tried, it really tried. But it fell short. Having been to Robuchon in Paris in the mid '90's there was nothing in common between the two experiences. There was a sincere attempt in Vegas but it still came up short.

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We had dinner two weeks ago at the three Michelin star Joel Robuchon in Las Vegas. My only comment is that three Michelin stars in Las Vegas and three Michelin stars in Italy/France/Spain/Germany/etc. are two entirely different experiences. I have wondered how many of the Michelin "inspectors" in the U. S. have had the fortunate experience to dine in Michelin starred restaurants in Europe to fully understand what is necessary for a fair comparison? Robuchon tried, it really tried. But it fell short. Having been to Robuchon in Paris in the mid '90's there was nothing in common between the two experiences. There was a sincere attempt in Vegas but it still came up short.

I haven't been to Robuchon in Vega$, so I can't really comment on that. I have been to Michelin three stars in Europe and the US. I don't feel its as much of a difference between European Michelin 3* and the 3* from other countries judging all in 2009. I think there is more to say about Michelin 3* in the 90's and the Michelin 3* of today.

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We had dinner two weeks ago at the three Michelin star Joel Robuchon in Las Vegas. My only comment is that three Michelin stars in Las Vegas and three Michelin stars in Italy/France/Spain/Germany/etc. are two entirely different experiences. I have wondered how many of the Michelin "inspectors" in the U. S. have had the fortunate experience to dine in Michelin starred restaurants in Europe to fully understand what is necessary for a fair comparison? Robuchon tried, it really tried. But it fell short. Having been to Robuchon in Paris in the mid '90's there was nothing in common between the two experiences. There was a sincere attempt in Vegas but it still came up short.

This is very much the opposite of the way your earlier statements about that meal read. I thought I remember you saying that several of the dishes were exactly the same quality.

I have only eaten in 3 European (El Bulli, Arzak, Fat Duck) & 2 American (Per Se, Jean Georges) 3 stars and the my meals in the European ones were miles better.

The list in NY is pretty strange below the three star level, of the 20 or so one or two star places I've eaten in I think that at least half of them are overrated, and I've had meals at one stars in Europe that were better than any of them.

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This is very much the opposite of the way your earlier statements about that meal read. I thought I remember you saying that several of the dishes were exactly the same quality.

I have only eaten in 3 European (El Bulli, Arzak, Fat Duck) & 2 American (Per Se, Jean Georges) 3 stars and the my meals in the European ones were miles better.

The list in NY is pretty strange below the three star level, of the 20 or so one or two star places I've eaten in I think that at least half of them are overrated, and I've had meals at one stars in Europe that were better than any of them.

This is a post of mine that ended up on the "Southwest" board of Chowhound:

But the dinner of the trip was at the three Michelin star Joel Robuchon in the MGM Grand. I was at Robuchon in Paris in the '90's before he first "retired." This is not as good. Still, it is a remarkable effort that is unlike anything in the D. C. area for its style. There were individual carts for: bread, butter, cheese, dessert and petit fours. A cart was wheeled by for each. The butter cart was extraordinary: a server pushed it over and on top stood a tree trunk sized slab of butter almost a foot high and six to eight inches thick. The server bent over and scaled the side of it, slicing off a thick curl that he placed on each of our plates. Following this he sprinkled fleur de lys on top. All of this to compliment one or two of the 20+ different breads and rolls that another cart featured.

There were two Great dishes including possibly the single best dish I have tasted in years anywhere: "braised veal cheeks with Thai broth and vegetable couscous with broccoli" along with an intense, rich, delicate "chestnut velouté with foie gras and smoked lardons foam." We deeply wafted the rich broth of the veal cheeks, almost sucking them into our nostrils as no other food I've found in years. Layers and layers of flavor: all four of us, all sophisticated at this level almost overwhelmed at the extraordinarily complex being pulled off so well. I've not had a meat dish in the D. C. area-or Europe for that matter that was better than this. Perhaps none that was as good. Anywhere.

Still, there was weakness at Robuchon. For myself and several others at the table we didn't think it merited three stars. Despite the two incredible dishes and the showstopping presentation of the butter it was not on the level I found in Paris in the mid '90's. But it tried.

The value judgment that I am making is that the three stars I've been to in Europe in the past several years have not had a "weak" course; all have been exemplery. Robuchon has at least two "Great Dishes" and several carts that were real showstoppers. But the overall experience felt a little bit short of, say, Germany's Schwarzwaldstube, Italy's Le Calandre, Dal Pescatore, etc. and several in France which we have been fortunate to experience in the past several years.

Mtpleasanteater, the comment about a three star today vs. the '90's is a really interesting one. It's hard not to wonder if some of this hasn't been "diluted." Robuchon fifteen years ago was a dinner of a lifetime without a step less than perfection. Vegas had moments of real brillance but the overall experience didn't approach the original. I have not been to Per Se but I have been to the French Laundry, twice. I don't believe this approaches any of the three stars that I have been to in Europe over the years. Some of the food does, yes. But the overall style is far short. A related question might be: "is Alain Ducasse in the U. S. as good as Alain Ducasse in Paris or Monte Carlo?"

I continue to believe that what Fabio did at Maestro before he left was at least a two Michelin star experience, short of only one or two staff from an European three star. I still believe this was the closest I've experienced for what was on the plate to what I've found in Europe. Factor in Vincent and true professional waitstaff and this is the benchmark for years to come for the D. C. area. I honestly believe that, "plate to plate" Fabio's Maestro was the equal of the three Michein star Le Calandre which I have been fortunate to visit four times. The only difference between the two might have been waitstaff to pick up a napkin that fell on the floor or a "bench" for a purse but otherwise Maesto was its equal. Pergola, Pinchiorri and Dal Pescatore, too.

...on reflection, considering Maestro's last several months: this really was a three Michelin star restaurant. It was actually BETTER than several three stars I've been to in Europe. At an absolute minimum, the equal of several others.

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This is a post of mine that ended up on the "Southwest" board of Chowhound:

The value judgment that I am making is that the three stars I've been to in Europe in the past several years have not had a "weak" course; all have been exemplery. Robuchon has at least two "Great Dishes" and several carts that were real showstoppers. But the overall experience felt a little bit short of, say, Germany's Schwarzwaldstube, Italy's Le Calandre, Dal Pescatore, etc. and several in France which we have been fortunate to experience in the past several years.

Mtpleasanteater, the comment about a three star today vs. the '90's is a really interesting one. It's hard not to wonder if some of this hasn't been "diluted." Robuchon fifteen years ago was a dinner of a lifetime without a step less than perfection. Vegas had moments of real brillance but the overall experience didn't approach the original. I have not been to Per Se but I have been to the French Laundry, twice. I don't believe this approaches any of the three stars that I have been to in Europe over the years. Some of the food does, yes. But the overall style is far short. A related question might be: "is Alain Ducasse in the U. S. as good as Alain Ducasse in Paris or Monte Carlo?"

I continue to believe that what Fabio did at Maestro before he left was at least a two Michelin star experience, short of only one or two staff from an European three star. I still believe this was the closest I've experienced for what was on the plate to what I've found in Europe. Factor in Vincent and true professional waitstaff and this is the benchmark for years to come for the D. C. area. I honestly believe that, "plate to plate" Fabio's Maestro was the equal of the three Michein star Le Calandre which I have been fortunate to visit four times. The only difference between the two might have been waitstaff to pick up a napkin that fell on the floor or a "bench" for a purse but otherwise Maesto was its equal. Pergola, Pinchiorri and Dal Pescatore, too.

...on reflection, considering Maestro's last several months: this really was a three Michelin star restaurant. It was actually BETTER than several three stars I've been to in Europe. At an absolute minimum, the equal of several others.

Alas, taste is of course subjective, as of course appreciation of a certain style would be as well. Everyone will have their personal favorite restaurants, and someone else will have a disappointing meal at said favorite restaurant. I could run down the list of disappointing meals I've had in Europe, and list all of the great meals I've had at restaurants in Europe and the US, but I don't think thats really very interesting because alas its just my opinion/experience. I guess what I was driving at earlier was that I don't think you can make a blanket statement that the 3*'s of Europe have a different standard than the 3*'s elsewhere in the world. The world is changing, the internet is becoming more influential. Does Michelin have to change with the times, do they need to change with the times, have they changed with the times. Is there a different expectation eating at a Michelin 3* restaurant in the 90's as opposed to today?

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Alas, taste is of course subjective, as of course appreciation of a certain style would be as well. Everyone will have their personal favorite restaurants, and someone else will have a disappointing meal at said favorite restaurant. I could run down the list of disappointing meals I've had in Europe, and list all of the great meals I've had at restaurants in Europe and the US, but I don't think thats really very interesting because alas its just my opinion/experience. I guess what I was driving at earlier was that I don't think you can make a blanket statement that the 3*'s of Europe have a different standard than the 3*'s elsewhere in the world. The world is changing, the internet is becoming more influential. Does Michelin have to change with the times, do they need to change with the times, have they changed with the times. Is there a different expectation eating at a Michelin 3* restaurant in the 90's as opposed to today?

Outside of the luxe factor, in my limited experience, I would say there is a difference between breaking new ground (then) and re-discovering craft (now).

One could also argue the difference between punk rock and "body art" versus Mozart and powdered wigs...

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Outside of the luxe factor, in my limited experience, I would say there is a difference between breaking new ground (then) and re-discovering craft (now).

One could also argue the difference between punk rock and "body art" versus Mozart and powdered wigs...

All of which are valid, if one keeps an open mind about things, no?
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All of which are valid, if one keeps an open mind about things, no?

This is mostly true. However, the type of service, the setting and the ambiance of the 2 and 3 star restaurants that I've visited in France have never been equaled by any nice restaurant in the US that I've dined at, including the Inn at Little Washington, Citronelle, Marcel's or any of the better restaurants in Washington. As an example, the Maitre d', Captain and waiter at Le Bristol in Paris recognized and greeted me on my last visit, which was 2 years after my last visit. The dinner was like magic. Serene, elegant, soothing, every aspect. The systems in Europe are different and can't be replicated here without undue cost. To be fair, it was far more expensive than anything available locally. At the time, it seemed worth it.

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And speaking of places that could/should have been a Bib Gourmand...

Based on my experience with Michelin starred restaurants in Europe, there's no clear correlation between quality of food/service and their Michelin rating.  My literal worst restaurant meal of 2015 was at Michelin 3-starred Akelarre.  The food was mediocre at best and barely edible at worst, the service declined precipitously during the meal from average to ridiculously sloppy (arguably second worst service I've ever received, behind Saba in NoVa).  If I was travelling to a city for which there is a Michelin guide, I might consult it as a potential list, but in no way would I consider it authoritative or consistent.

(On the same trip, I had one of my best meals of 2015 at another 3-star, Restaurant Martin Berasategui.  The food was wonderful and the service was exceptionally exemplary.)

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"Michelin Is Too Buttoned-Up To See the Stars of the DC Dining Scene" by Tom Sietsema on washingtonpost.com

Sietsema doesn’t think Michelin can cover DC but he thinks he can rate all the cities in the u.s. based on on one visit.  I have no respect for Sietsema’s opinion at all.  I know he has no clue about Asian cuisines.  To say Minibar is the best avant-garde kitchen is to reveal his ignorance.  

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On 10/17/2017 at 7:56 PM, Ericandblueboy said:

"Michelin Is Too Buttoned-Up To See the Stars of the DC Dining Scene" by Tom Sietsema on washingtonpost.com

Sietsema doesn’t think Michelin can cover DC but he thinks he can rate all the cities in the u.s. based on on one visit.  I have no respect for Sietsema’s opinion at all.  I know he has no clue about Asian cuisines.  To say Minibar is the best avant-garde kitchen is to reveal his ignorance.  

I think it is HILARIOUS that he is taking issue with how Michelin is handling/covering/rating DC restaurants. HILARIOUS.

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Bib Gourmand list for DC is out.  (I'm going to assume that the removal of 2 Amys is just due to its closure at the time of publication, and therefore avoid a rant.)  Some excellent new additions, although the criteria for this list continue to be comically pointless given the proliferation of (not cheap) small plates restaurants where you couldn't really have a full meal under the cost threshold.  

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I’ve never heard of Das, and no one here has tried the Napoli Pasta Bar (and the only reason I know it exists is from perusing Resy or maybe Reserve).

I think it might be fun to check out these restaurants instead of blaming Tom for being the only clueless critic in town.  Now he can share the blame.

Oh, I saw a Facebook post from Sushi Taro that says they recognized Tom but played along like they didn’t know who he was.  

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das is the ethiopian restaurant in georgetown (right over the bridge) that used to be zed's (not sure if there was a change in ownership/kitchen with the name change).  i haven't been in years, but zed's was a favorite . . . probably fifteen or more years ago?  (if i recall correctly, it was the first place that i ever had shrimp at an ethiopian restaurant, which appealed to a pescatarian who sometimes likes variety beyond a veggie combo.)  it is no surprise to me that in a city full of ethiopian restaurants, michelin honed in on the fanciest both in decor and neighborhood!

that is hilarious and totally unsurprising re taro and tom. :) 

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probably a topic for another thread, but I saw that Taro tweet and have seen Tom get defensive in chats in the past about trying to remain anonymous. at this point, it seems like it's mostly an ego thing, his decision to "remain anonymous." seems like most any restaurant in town worth its salt recognizes him and when they don't that's on the restaurant. 

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On 10/17/2017 at 7:56 PM, Ericandblueboy said:

"Michelin Is Too Buttoned-Up To See the Stars of the DC Dining Scene" by Tom Sietsema on washingtonpost.com

Sietsema doesn’t think Michelin can cover DC but he thinks he can rate all the cities in the u.s. based on on one visit.

Michelin is just, plain *awful* at judging DC Dining (and I say this a year after this previous guide was written, and since they've doubled their "Bib Gourmand" section). So, ironically, this article managed to pin the tail on the donkey, despite it being for the exactly wrong reasons. Anyone with half a brain, who doesn't even frequent restaurants, could use the internet to form a list equal, or superior to, what Michelin managed to produce for their 2018 Bib Gourmand restaurants.

Restaurant critics are afraid to come out and say that most people have terrible taste in dining (or wine), but it's true, even though such a statement will extract the trolls from the woodwork, and get you labeled an "elitist" and a "snob." (Those same armchair critics who label you as such will, of course, defend to their death the net benefits of glyphosate, the recoil of a Kel-Tec PMR-30 .22 Mag, or the intractable benefits of coal gasification, and the morons who haven't done their due diligence aren't entitled to say a whole hell of a lot about any of the above).

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Totally agree with you Don. I don't think I have very great taste in food or wine (compared to those on this board) but I do know that when other people pick the restaurant, it basically sucks. I have not, however, figured out how to dissuade people from bringing me to Founding Farmers and its ilk. Basically, on the DR scale, I"m in the lower 10% but IRL I'm like in the 70s. Maybe even 80s.

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On 9/8/2018 at 4:10 PM, NolaCaine said:

Totally agree with you Don. I don't think I have very great taste in food or wine (compared to those on this board) but I do know that when other people pick the restaurant, it basically sucks. I have not, however, figured out how to dissuade people from bringing me to Founding Farmers and its ilk. Basically, on the DR scale, I"m in the lower 10% but IRL I'm like in the 70s. Maybe even 80s.

Training for getting better at recognizing seriously good food and drink is in some ways easy (go drink and eat more in places you have not tried, regularly and a lot) and in some ways difficult (where to eat, what to eat, what to try, what to learn, when to dine, when to cook, when to bake,AAAAAAAH!). But the internet in general helps. Cookbooks help. But this board helps enormously. And your own palate. Trust it. Prime it. Test it. CHALLENGE IT.

I was a hater of tomatoes until I was maybe....30, maybe a little sooner. But, in reality, my tastes evolved. My access to amazing product be it raw or out dining, surpassed all possible experiences with it. Just because you think you 'hate' all of such and such (say, broccoli), probably means that you have not had a preparation you like and are enthralled by. I encourage everyone to keep trying. You never know when you have evolved, You never know when the world has evolved to meet your palate. When those two things meet, it can be a beatiful wonderful thing.

And do not get me started about my wine evolution - it it embarrassing. Haha!

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12 hours ago, Pool Boy said:

Training for getting better at recognizing seriously good food and drink is in some ways easy (go drink and eat more in places you have not tried, regularly and a lot) and in some ways difficult (where to eat, what to eat, what to try, what to learn, when to dine, when to cook, when to bake,AAAAAAAH!). But the internet in general helps. Cookbooks help. But this board helps enormously. And your own palate. Trust it. Prime it. Test it. CHALLENGE IT.

Here's a little teaser:

In about two weeks, everyone here will have the opportunity to learn - really learn - more about the fine-dining end of the spectrum, than they've ever had a chance to learn about before.

It will be fun and interesting.

It will only take up as much time as you want to invest.

And, as always, it will be free.

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