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Inox, Chefs Jon Mathieson and Jonathan Krinn in Tysons Corner - Closed


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I'm now hearing it's under the PWC building in Tysons, a level below the seafood restaurant that's there. Interesting location, with plenty of nearby competition, including Gordon Ramsay at the Ritz. This is a tough market to be opening a high end restaurant, don't you think?

Are you talking about Krinn's new place?

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Are you talking about Krinn's new place?

Yes. I picked up that rumor today, along with the one about Ramsay at the Ritz -- apparently, the Ritz wants more than the Ramsay name, they want him in person, at least doing cameos. And I'm surprised Krinn chose this place in this market. I may have mentioned in a Chima's thread that a friend of mine on the Board at the Tower Club says that every Board meeting deals with the traffic in Tysons and how horrific it will be as they construct the Metro out there, and how no restaurant can survive the combination of traffic snarl and deep recession at the same time.

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Kibbee Nayee,

I'm not calling you out or anything, but I think it's a safe bet that Inox, traffic issues and competition withstanding, is most likely going to be one of the most successful new restaurants in the DC area. The talent alone will make this a destination that many people (myself included) will weather the economic storm to rush to whenever it opens. I would be more worried about trying to get a reservation here in the first 2 months it's open then it potentially not surviving!

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Kibbee Nayee,

I'm not calling you out or anything, but I think it's a safe bet that Inox, traffic issues and competition withstanding, is most likely going to be one of the most successful new restaurants in the DC area. The talent alone will make this a destination that many people (myself included) will weather the economic storm to rush to whenever it opens. I would be more worried about trying to get a reservation here in the first 2 months it's open then it potentially not surviving!

Let me just say for the record that I hope you're right, and I'll be in line for a reservation. I'm rooting for Krinn to succeed in this market. We need far fewer chains, and more Inox'es.....!

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I don't really buy that high-end places can't succeed in Tysons. I worked there for years and places like the Palm and Capital Grille and Morton's are packed all of the time, although I can't say that I have been to any of these places recently. I just think that the people the work and live in Tysons need to decide to try someplace other than these steak joints.

At the same time, I can't remember why Colvin Run Tavern failed in that space.

Chima, on the other hand, is likely not doing well because it just isn't very good.

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Set aside the quality of fare for the moment -- the trending in Tysons is not good. The lunch crowd is largely driven by expense accounts, and the current market has whacked away at those expense accounts considerably. The dinner crowd is going to be affected by the traffic snarl, which I hear will be so bad that competition in McLean and Vienna will likely benefit as diners decide to detour out of it.

By the way, one of the major benefactors of Chima has been Freddie Mac, usually with a large table or party in the back just about every day. That revenue is drying up for Chima.

I'm rooting for Inox, but Gordon Ramsay will be next door and the ubiquitous beef-eating crowd has The Palm, Capital Grille and Morton's nearby, all with ostentatious martinis and cigar friendly bars.

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A fearsome proposition indeed.

As is the wine list. Lovers of oxidative Rioja and other delectable curiosities should immediately begin socking away a bit of cash to enjoy this list. And I have it on exceptionally good authority that the man in charge of mixing cocktails is more than qualified.

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This is a time of great euphoria: three Jon/Johns, four chefs, and one new home. Forces just came together and fell into place, so this will be a time of inspiration and originality. Together, we only have our hands to stretch out to you. I am thrilled to be a part of this passionate team. Thank you for being supportive and for your kind and good wishes. I look forward to seeing you all again soon.

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Any update on opening? I've been looking forward to it for a long time.

My sources say next week is dry runs and soon there after they will open. It seems that all of the final finishing touches are carefully being put into place and are almost complete.

I heard from the three jons that they are not rushing this, as they want the opening to be something that people will remember as a Good Opening and not one that they regret having been a part of. With all of their talent, I suspect that they will meet that task and we can all look forward to not just a solid opening, but a long and

interesting future for JK, JM, JW & RP!

Good Luck Boys!

And Congrats Rissa

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I just got a lunch invitation for next week and they are trying to get a reservation at INOX. I hope they are open for lunch next week!

Of course as soon as Pete saw they were opening he went on open table and got us a dinner reservation for next Friday. We have been waiting for this place to open.

Hope to see you there Rissa!

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I had prior dinner plans in the neighborhood, so despite being stuffed to the gills I stopped by the bar afterwards to have a cocktail and take a look around. Valet parking is gratis for now. Looking past the bold signage out front, the interior is a handsome space without being self-consciously excessive, particularly the side of the bar facing the patrons, which is fashioned from two slabs of walnut cut from a single trunk.

A brief glance at the menu suggests that fans of the Jon^2 show will feel right at home. There's also a tasting menu option which opens with two seafood items, then moves through fowl and venison, then to an intriguing elderflower soup, and closing with two dessert courses, for a total of seven courses priced at $93.

About that cocktail: the Inox Club ($11, as are all of the cocktails), the house signature drink, is a riff on the silver gin fizz, kicked up with Domaine de Canton and a ginger/honey infusion. It's tasty without being a he-man drink, and rumored to have been concocted with a bit of advice from the indispensible Derek Brown.

Congratulations to the Inox crew on opening the doors...now let's see that food!

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There's also a tasting menu option which opens with two seafood items, then moves through fowl and venison, then to an intriguing elderflower soup, and closing with two dessert courses for a total of seven courses, priced at $93.

Wow - seems a little steep granted without knowing much about the details of the menu. By comparison:

CityZen - $110/5 course

Komi - $125

This would put the cooking in the price range with some exceptional company. I look forward to trying it out soon.

Wish them all the best on the opening.

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Wow - seems a little steep granted without knowing much about the details of the menu. By comparison:

CityZen - $110/5 course

Komi - $125

This would put the cooking in the price range with some exceptional company. I look forward to trying it out soon.

Wish them all the best on the opening.

Maestro, one hundred yards away when it was open, started at $95 in its first year and when it closed in August of '07 was $159 prix fixe. I would also add that Maestro was subsidized by the hotel for its first few years along with the belief that it would help book hotel rooms. Inox has to stand and turn a profit on its own. I have not been to it yet but my initial reaction is that this is a very fair price for this level of dining. It is also an option. I wish them the absolute best of luck.

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Okay, so having anxiously waited for over a year, my wife and I had to go to Inox last night for what turned out to be a very soft opening, with the number of tables intentionally very limited. All I can say is WOW! With surprisingly few glitches for opening night, the meal was excellent from start to finish. There were a number of jokes throughout the evening about the restaurant still having the new car smell and the pages of the wine list still being warm having just come off the printer, but things appeared to be running very smoothly already.

Very nice modern decor, limited only by the view (but what can you expect on the ground floor in a Tysons office park). Comfortable seating with a decently sized two-top. The windowed kitchen is down stairs from the dining room but in easy view.

We of course had to have the tasting menu (while $93 is steep, it was reasonable for what was delivered), although there were a lot of interesting things on the a la carte menu I regretted passing up. I didn't take notes, so excuse the lack of detail on some of the courses.

The amuse started things off well, artichoke three ways. Quite a lot of flavor in two small bites. This was followed by a smoked diver scallop cut in half with foie gras in the middle. Not very smoky, but everything blended together well and it was not nearly as rich as I anticipated (which is a good thing to me). Next was black cod in a vegetable broth (sorry, I don't remember the primary ingredient) with pieces of lobster. I don't know when black cod started getting so popular, but it's a trend I support.

I had asked about the preparation of an escargot tortellini, which is a side to the grouper on the a la carte menu, so they next brought out a tasting menu size portion (apparently you get one with the grouper). I had know idea what to expect, but this was unlike any escargot preparation I've ever had. Flavorful and tender, it was so good I recommended this become a tasting menu course on its own, rather than a side to something else.

The breast and leg of quail that followed was the stunner of the evening for me. Served with a black truffle on truffled noodles, it had a rich slightly gamey flavor that I love. To the frequent embarrassment of my wife, I tend to nibble on the bones of small game birds at restaurants, but this was so tender and well prepared, every bit of meat came off the bone easily so there was no need for that.

The venison was the only slight disappointment, but that had nothing to do with the preparation. While very tasty, I've noted here before that I continue to be unsatisfied with the venison that now fills the market. It doesn't ever seem to have the gamey flavor that makes venison venison. While this was better than some I've had lately, it still to me seemed like just a nicely prepared piece of red meat.

The elderflower and blueberry "soup" with buttermilk ice cream was an interesting dessert appetizer. More gel than soup, an intriguing mix of flavors.

I'm not normally a dessert guy, but last night's was one I could easily go for again. A soft chocolate bar with a chocolate crunchy substance inside accompanied by Earl Grey ice cream was a joy. I love Earl Grey tea but have never had it as ice cream, and now I'd love to try to make it on my own.

A couple of words about the bread. Served by the slice, rather than in a basket, which I prefer. At 2941, I always ate too much of the bread or felt guilty leaving this woderful bread to go to waste. As expected, it was wonderful. Last night's choices were olive (yum), rye and French. One suggestion - while we were offered out choice on the first serving, when replaced the servers apparently just pulled slices randomly ( I had to stop one to get another slice of the olive). Since I would expect diners to want to try each of the offerings at some point in the evening, a choice should be offered each go round. I don't know if there is the intention down the road to give diners a loaf to go (a la 2941), but one was not offered last night, and I miss that (although we did dart out pretty quickly after paying our bill).

The wine list is quite large, diverse and very well selected. There also seems to be gennuine enthusiasm about the wines and a willingness to discuss them. Good choices at various price points. If I can get a bottle and a half of good wine for $100, that's a good list in my opinion.

I loved the food at 2941, so if you did not, YMMV. One concern I had over the years at 2941 was the pacing of the meal. Last night it was perfect, even with the unplanned course thrown in, but there were very few tables filled. I hope they can keep up that level as the restaurant gets crowded.

At these prices, this is not the kind of place I can go to every week, but as you can no doubt guess, we'll be back frequently. Particularly since Maestro is gone, it's so nice to have a top notch restaurant this close to home (and so nice to have something in Tysons other than steak and inferior fish restaurants).

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Wow - seems a little steep granted without knowing much about the details of the menu. By comparison:

CityZen - $110/5 course

Komi - $125

This would put the cooking in the price range with some exceptional company. I look forward to trying it out soon.

Wish them all the best on the opening.

Just as a note, I wouldn't expect any restaurant to get its pricing exactly right on its open. I spend a lot of my day looking at pricing of various things from CPG's to securities, and it's extremely rare that in goods and services that touch consumers that new businesses or new offerings get it right on the first shot, so I wouldn't hold too much stock in anyone's pricing when they open.
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Maestro, one hundred yards away when it was open, started at $95 in its first year and when it closed in August of '07 was $159 prix fixe. I would also add that Maestro was subsidized by the hotel for its first few years along with the belief that it would help book hotel rooms. Inox has to stand and turn a profit on its own. I have not been to it yet but my initial reaction is that this is a very fair price for this level of dining. It is also an option. I wish them the absolute best of luck.

I Totally agree.....Inox isn't out of line getting $93 for a tasting menu...

Their food is going to be top notch and the service will be equally matched. Just think about what you have there to prove that.

Two Great Chefs in the kitchen, one on the wine rack and another as service director...a secondary staff of sous who know whats going on..

Two of whom have been with the two Jons for YEARS and another having come from San Fran......

They are using high quality products......I think $93 is overly fair...Those that don't like it can skip it..

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If I'd walked in off the street not knowing this was Inox's second night of service, nothing I ate or drank would have given me that impression. There are some really interesting dishes on the menu, including the grouper with escargot tortellini mentioned downthread, and an appetizer of pumpkin pierogi in onion bouillon that was far more savory and meaty than I'd expected. The seared duck breast entree is excellent as well, and the table next to ours had entrees of Wagyu steak and salmon that also looked very promising.

Desserts are just right - the pastry chef (first name Scot - I can't recall his last name) came over from 2941, so a lot of the desserts have the wonderful ice creams and sorbets that were a feature there. We tried a milk chocolate bread pudding with fleur de sel and olive oil ice cream, and a warm pineapple mousse with pineapple sorbet. I remember seeing a banana-cardamom ice cream on the menu as well, but don't remember what it accompanied.

The wine list is (of course) solid, the space is lovely, and while things are obviously still ramping up capacity-wise, I think we're looking at a winner here.

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NQD and I had the tasting menu last night. I had the wine pairings, she didn't. JPBloom got it right, so I'm not going to bother with redundant descriptions. Minor notes: The scallop was unlike any scallop either of us has ever had (in a good way). As for the venison, I don't particularly like the strong gaminess the wild stuff can have, so I'm quite happy with the farm-raised, milder version. Our dessert was different, some delicious concoction of quince, lychee, crepes & sorbet. I had far too much wine at that point to remember the details, and can't seem to find my copy of the menu, which I may have left behind. That's regrettable, because it had the excellent wine pairings on it, along with the name of something NQD had (thanks to the very well-dressed John Wabeck) that worked beautifully with both the quail and venison.

Service was excellent, which I guess should be expected when Rissa is out front. There were at worst very tiny, minor glitches in timing, probably unnoticeable in a lesser restaurant. Nothing I would call mistakes or errors, and certainly nothing to complain about, but just enough to separate "excellent" from "flawless". Considering it was the second night of service, that's very impressive. Give them a week or so of working together and that should work itself out.

And yes, the bread really is that good.

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