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FunnyJohn

Fiola, Penn Quarter in the old Le Paradou Space - The First Member of Gruppo FT Restaurants

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Does the restaurant have any interesting beers on the menu? Or is it your typical Italian restaurant swill like Peroni, Moretti, etc...

As it stands now, we have Lagunitas Pilsner, Port City Wit, Founders Porter, Eliot Ness Lager, and Avery IPA all in bottles. We do offer up Peroni, Moretti, & Moretti Rossa for the Italian beers along with 375ml of Super Baladin as well as 750ml of Nora if you're looking for Italian craft beers. Hope this helps, and if you're looking for something in particular I'll do my best to get it in for you.

Cheers,

Jeff

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jmbindc   

My wife and I were quite excited to try out Fiola, as we had heard it was aiming to be DC's next four-star Italian restaurant. We arrived at 7:45 for our 8:00 p.m. dinner reservation and checked in with the hostesses. No table was ready, so we sat at the bar approximately six feet from the hostess station. We proceeded to wait, and wait, and wait some more. At no point did any of the three hostesses working that night bother to apologize, check in, or explain why it was taking so long. Nor were we offered any appetizers (free or otherwise) to eat while we waited. At one point another party of two that didn't have reservations AND arrived after us got seated, while we were still waiting. (We know that they didn't have reservations and were seated before us because we were seated at the bar six feet from the hostess station, so we overheard every conversation.) Finally, at 8:48 (OVER ONE HOUR AFTER CHECK-IN), our table was ready. When the first ordered food finally arrived, at 9:30 p.m., it seemed quite tasty but who knows when you're that hungry.

Also, Fiola, if you're listening, we would have gladly paid for the five-course tasting menu had we been seated promptly. But given how long that can take, I just didn't have it in me given how late we were seated. You would have made more money off of us had you seated us promptly, and we might even have given you a better review and been more willing to consider going back.

At any rate, the total bill was $150 for two pasta appetizers (the spaghetti Bolognese special, and the lobster ravioli, both of which were very good but not great), one shared entrée (the braised beef short ribs, where were boneless and ridiculously tender) and one shared dessert (the ricotta donuts, easily the best part of the meal); at this price point, which doesn't include alcohol, I expect better treatment. The spaghetti's sauce was heavy and substantial, though I would have preferred a bit more meat (perhaps some wild boar ragu). The pasta itself was comparable to that of Galileo III. Lobster ravioli was full of lobster, but could have used a bit more other flavor to complement it, if you ask me. Short ribs were, as mentioned, quite tender and had a good flavor, plus excellent marbling. The ricotta donuts were fantastic, with great texture and just the right amount of sweetness and a hint of lemon.

In fairness, I should say that while the three hostesses (Why do you need three when none of them bother checking in with waiting patrons? Couldn't one person "not check in" just as easily as three?) did nothing about our wait, at least the bartenders checked in frequently and comped us with prosecco for our troubles. The bartenders seemed very friendly and apologized for the wait, which is more than can be said for anybody else.

Fiola, if you're really aiming to be a four-star destination, you could start by treating properly your customers who have reservations and want to pay you to eat nice food. The intake process is your first interaction with potential diners, and if that goes poorly you've created a bad first impression. As we all know, it's very difficult to overcome negative first impressions. Here's hoping others have better luck with Fiola.

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monavano   

^^

Did you speak with a manager? It would have been nice to be offered a comped drink or dessert for being made to wait for an hour *and* watch a couple sans reservation get seated. I give you credit for hanging in there for an hour. I would have gone to Taco Bell to get the taste of bile out of my mouth.

That's just piss poor treatment.

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jmbindc   

^^

Did you speak with a manager? It would have been nice to be offered a comped drink or dessert for being made to wait for an hour *and* watch a couple sans reservation get seated. I give you credit for hanging in there for an hour. I would have gone to Taco Bell to get the taste of bile out of my mouth.

That's just piss poor treatment.

I thought about speaking with a manager, but wanted to see how the restaurant would respond without being prompted. We told the waiter about our experience shortly after being seated, and I wanted to see whether he would be comping us anything. As I said, the bartenders were quite apologetic and did comp us prosecco (no help for the wife, as she's pregnant). And I did follow up with the hostesses right after seeing the no-reservation couple get a table. Their response was that five tables were occupied and they would be with us once one of them freed up (which apparently was another 25 minutes later).

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B.A.R.   

I thought about speaking with a manager, but wanted to see how the restaurant would respond without being prompted. We told the waiter about our experience shortly after being seated, and I wanted to see whether he would be comping us anything. As I said, the bartenders were quite apologetic and did comp us prosecco (no help for the wife, as she's pregnant). And I did follow up with the hostesses right after seeing the no-reservation couple get a table. Their response was that five tables were occupied and they would be with us once one of them freed up (which apparently was another 25 minutes later).

It has been my experience that restaurants usually respond pretty quickly once they realize they made a mistake. It sounds to me like the number of hostess' may have even hampered the situation, as they all may have thought your reservation had already been seated by one of the other two. You were forgotten, and that happens sometimes. But if the hostesses or managers don't know they have forgotten you, nothing will get resolved.

Rather than waiting to see how a restaurant would respond to a possibly unknown mistake, if patrons bring the issue directly to someones attention, it more often than not gets handled quickly.

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JonS   

I thought about speaking with a manager, but wanted to see how the restaurant would respond without being prompted. We told the waiter about our experience shortly after being seated, and I wanted to see whether he would be comping us anything. As I said, the bartenders were quite apologetic and did comp us prosecco (no help for the wife, as she's pregnant). And I did follow up with the hostesses right after seeing the no-reservation couple get a table. Their response was that five tables were occupied and they would be with us once one of them freed up (which apparently was another 25 minutes later).

So, are you saying that you waited just over an hour without even once checking back in with a hostess and/or saying anything to a manager? So you could see how the restaurant would respond without being prompted and so you could see whether you'd be comped anything? Was that really more important than bringing the issue to the attention of someone who was perhaps in the position to do something about it and to help make sure you had an enjoyable evening out?

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monavano   

So, are you saying that you waited just over an hour without even once checking back in with a hostess and/or saying anything to a manager? So you could see how the restaurant would respond without being prompted and so you could see whether you'd be comped anything? Was that really more important than bringing the issue to the attention of someone who was perhaps in the position to do something about it and to help make sure you had an enjoyable evening out?

I would have been checking in with the hostess, for sure. I think not honoring reservation times is a major fail, and I would rather leave and go to McDonald's than pay $$ when I'm already irritated and my bubble has been burst.

He did mention that he and his wife were sitting 6 feet away from the hostess, so how she could forget is beyond me. They were in plain view the whole time.

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thetrain   

So, are you saying that you waited just over an hour without even once checking back in with a hostess and/or saying anything to a manager? So you could see how the restaurant would respond without being prompted and so you could see whether you'd be comped anything? Was that really more important than bringing the issue to the attention of someone who was perhaps in the position to do something about it and to help make sure you had an enjoyable evening out?

If you reread his posts you will see he checked back in about a half hour after he first arrived once he saw people without reservations get seated ahead of him.

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JonS   

If you reread his posts you will see he checked back in about a half hour after he first arrived once he saw people without reservations get seated ahead of him.

Thanks. Now that I reread the posts, I see that. I would have little tolerance for that kind of wait after a reservation; in fact, it's one of the reasons to this day that I'll not go back to Galileo, regardless of what number Roberto Donna puts after it. But it still seems to me that waiting for a manager or hostess to do something to see how they'll handle it and whether you get a comp does little other than to increase your risk of having a less than pleasant evening. Things get missed for all kinds of reasons.

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B.A.R.   

If you reread his posts you will see he checked back in about a half hour after he first arrived once he saw people without reservations get seated ahead of him.

I didn't see that mentioned in the original post, but do see itin the second. Mea culpa. B)

That being said, clearly the restaurant realized they erred when they eventually sat them. At that time, the restaurant could have addressed the error in a positive and gracious manner. But I would not have waited it out to "see" how Fiola would have handled it. I would have spoken up.

Hostesses should (but often don't) tell managers when they have screwed up. Same with waiters.

Edited by B.A.R.

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monavano   

^^^

I thought about speaking with a manager, but wanted to see how the restaurant would respond without being prompted. We told the waiter about our experience shortly after being seated, and I wanted to see whether he would be comping us anything. As I said, the bartenders were quite apologetic and did comp us prosecco (no help for the wife, as she's pregnant). And I did follow up with the hostesses right after seeing the no-reservation couple get a table. Their response was that five tables were occupied and they would be with us once one of them freed up (which apparently was another 25 minutes later).

He was proactive. I would have escalated a bit and voiced my displeasure (in the nicest way, of course B) ). The onus is on Fiola, IMO. There were at least 3 employees that knew that this couple waited an entire hour, and 2 of them failed to take the opportunity to try to make things right and send away happy customers.

Kudos to the bartender.

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jmbindc   

Sorry for any confusion. What I meant about seeing if Fiola would do anything to make it better is AFTER we were seated. Before we were seated, I checked in with the hostesses once, and made eye contact with them (which they acknowledged with nods and what-not) numerous times to make sure they hadn't forgotten about us. (Remember, we sat six feet from them, so they weren't forgetting us or seating people without us knowing about it.) There was another couple waiting for their 8:00 reservation as well, and IIRC they got seated maybe 10-15 minutes before us. So, it wasn't just us experiencing problems, but we certainly got the worst of it.

What I meant about seeing if Fiola would try to make it right, is that I told the waiter about our hour-long wait, and decided to see if he would escalate the issue to a manager or try to get us something comped. The answer was no. Thus, the issue wasn't whether I should be pro-active about getting seated (believe me, I tried), but rather whether I should be proactive about getting a free dessert. To me, that's a bit like extracting a forced apology, and at that point the $10-$15 meant little to me. I'd gladly trade $10-$15 for knowing whether a restaurant really wants to right its wrongs.

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JonS   

Sorry for any confusion. What I meant about seeing if Fiola would do anything to make it better is AFTER we were seated. Before we were seated, I checked in with the hostesses once, and made eye contact with them (which they acknowledged with nods and what-not) numerous times to make sure they hadn't forgotten about us. (Remember, we sat six feet from them, so they weren't forgetting us or seating people without us knowing about it.) There was another couple waiting for their 8:00 reservation as well, and IIRC they got seated maybe 10-15 minutes before us. So, it wasn't just us experiencing problems, but we certainly got the worst of it.

What I meant about seeing if Fiola would try to make it right, is that I told the waiter about our hour-long wait, and decided to see if he would escalate the issue to a manager or try to get us something comped. The answer was no. Thus, the issue wasn't whether I should be pro-active about getting seated (believe me, I tried), but rather whether I should be proactive about getting a free dessert. To me, that's a bit like extracting a forced apology, and at that point the $10-$15 meant little to me. I'd gladly trade $10-$15 for knowing whether a restaurant really wants to right its wrongs.

Thanks for the clarifications. Sorry for the suggestion then that you weren't proactive in addressing the situation. I absolutely agree with you that that would be like extracting a forced apology. Sounds like the restaurant clearly should have done better by you, and I'm surprised they didn't. In contrast to some other even high- or higher-end restaurants, I've always found the service at Chef Trabocchi's restaurants very attentive and well polished and ready to jump to smartly fix something that might not be right.

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Sthitch   

Reading the last string of comments makes me wonder why it is so rare for service personal in restaurants to proactively engage a manager on the part of the customer. I have never worked in a restaurant so I certainly do not understand the working dynamics of a dining room, but I know that when there is a problem and a manager comes over to my table without be asked for it really smoothes things over rather quickly.

A tale of two dinners: At a dinner at Tosca my mother had to send her steak back for being undercooked (it was bleu and she wanted medium), right after the steak was returned the manager came over and to find out what the problem was and offered to have the other dishes taken back to the kitchen to be kept warm while it was refired. While we did not take him up on the offer it was a kind gesture. On the flip side, at Clyde's Mark Center I had to send back a piece of prime rib four times because it was cold and never once was a manager made aware of the situation. In this case he might have been able to ensure that cold meat was not sent out of the kitchen or that they had not decided to grill the piece to ensure it was warm, instead I have sworn off that location (and Clyde's for anything other than wings and oysters).

Is it usual to have such a poor working relationship between restaurant management and workers that they are afraid to interact with them on the customer's behalf?

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Is it usual to have such a poor working relationship between restaurant management and workers that they are afraid to interact with them on the customer's behalf?

Is it possible to have a bad boss anywhere? Sure. Usual? Impossible to say. I waited tables at a big jazz/dinner club in NYC, and when I wouldn't "go out with" (ie. have sex with) the manager, I was always assigned the station furthest from the bar and kitchen--the tables that were seated long after people were already dining at the better tables, so I got fewer tips, and had to walk farther to complete each order, so sore feet by the end of the night guaranteed.

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B.A.R.   

Sthitch, it's often times because they think the guest is just a complaining SOB and the issue was "no big deal".

It is a too prevalent mis-perception in the service industry that people who complain are out to "get something." People are an all sorts of different moods when they go out to dinner (or check into a hotel) but very rare is the case that someone actually has it in their mind prior to going out that "Tonight, I am going to make some shit up."

99.0% of the populous have mostly reasonable expectations, and mostly reasonable demands. And .9% have unreasonable expectations and demands, but ARE NOT necessarily lying. They're just more difficult.

Even very good, seasoned professionals succumb to the "most people are lying', or "they were just miserable complainers" disease from time to time. My hotel is not immune to it, but we work and train on it constantly.

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Took the +1 to Fiola last night for a spur of the moment celebratory meal (for finishing year 1 of her masters, and for me just surviving another week at work :D ). Arrived about 30 min before our 815 reservation to a basically empty bar (the patio outside and restaurant below were full btw) so we ponied up for a few drinks: she had the negroni and I had the something mule (a riff on the moscow mule, but clearly I haven't had enough caffeine this morning to get he brain firing), both well executed.

Once we were seating (right at 8:15), Theo stopped by to ask if there were any specific wines and, as I had done previously when he was at Ripple I asked him to find me an interesting Italian red from the list that might be flexible enough to go through the tasting menu we were considering. He came back with a delicious sangiovese blend (I am cursing myself for not remembering the name) that in my opinion worked well with what we ended up ordering, particularly the short ribs.

For the tasting menu the lineup looked like this:

-Amuse - melon gaspacho with a duo of SF Bay oysters topped with some caviar

-Starter - Ahi tuna over tomato with meyer lemon

-Pasta - Lobster ravioli

-Seafood - Olive oil poached brodetto with peppers and red wine reduction

-Main - 72 hour braised short ribs

-Dessert - Chocolate / Cherry "bomb" with pistachio gelato

They also offered the option to swap things out, and I waffled on going with the crab pasta that was much discussed upthread, but decided against it and in all honesty, I was really pleased with the entire meal. I would say each course really hit a home run with the short ribs in particular being knee knockingly good (I could have eaten multiple orders of this). Also, as a pistachio gelato fiend, their version is particularly good. From a cost perspective the tasting menu was $85 and in all honesty, I think its a great deal considering the prices across the rest of the menu (clearly I had not yet wound down from the work week as I was running a "cost analysis" against the tasting menu vs. ordering a la carte in my head... B)).

All in all, an excellent meal, great wine, and solid service...we will certainly be back.

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vineguy   

How many times should someone have to call a restaurant to book a LARGE party before they give up? Once? Twice? THREE TIMES??? How about an in-person visit? And no response... nada, nein, zip, zilch, goose egg.

Thus is the tale of my experience at Fiola - the hot, hip new Italian eatery captained by Uber-chic Chef Fabio Trabocchi and his spouse, Maria.

I have been trying for two weeks now to book a dinner party at Fiola and cannot get as much as a return call to tell me to drop dead. My firm is getting ready to celebrate our ten year anniversary and I want to treat my staff to a fantastic evening of food, wine and fun to mark the occasion. I had dined there recently for a wine dinner and I was impressed with the service, food and ambiance, so I thought Fiola would be the perfect spot to host dinner for 30 people.

After leaving three messages - count 'em, three - for Maria Trabocchi (the chef/owner's wife and director of private dining), I decided to confront her directly. My wife and I went with another couple to Fiola for dinner last week to celebrate our 26th wedding anniversary. When we arrived, I asked the hostess to please send Maria over to the table so that I could give her a card and make the connection.

Overall, the evening was a solid 8. The food was very good and both our server (ask for Ashley) and the wine director (Theo) were attentive and charming. We noticed Maria flitting about the restaurant visiting most of the tables and giving everyone the standard kiss-kiss routine. But somehow, we escaped her attention and she never as much as looked in our direction. Must have been my cologne?!?

On the way out, I asked to speak to Maria. I explained who I was and that I was trying to book a dinner party for 30 - count 'em - 30 people. She feigned great surprise and promised (PROMISED) to give me a call on my cell phone the very next day. And I am still waiting.

Why am I taking the time to rant about this seemingly trivial experience? Because I have had my fill of restaurants (and other businesses) that just DON'T GET IT! It's like the scene in the movie Network when the news anchor stands up and delivers his famous "I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore" speech. It's that simple.

Citronelle (another story) and (BLT Steak) could take a lesson from Wolfgang Puck's The Source or any of Ashok Bajaj's eateries. Every single time I have been at any of these restaurants, they have made me feel welcomed and comfortable, like Norm at Cheers (you older readers will probably get that reference). So why didn't I start with The Source (or Bibiana) for the anniversary party? Good question. And now I will!

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monavano   

Yup, take your business somewhere else. I'd have jitters starting the process off on a bad foot. Not good juju.

ps...nice boss!!

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Our experience Saturday was decidedly mixed. The space is gorgeous, and the noise level is perfect for quiet conversation. But I think the A team had left for vacation.

We were seated promptly for a 715 reservation, but we waited a while for menus. Then, after receiving menus, we waited a while for further service. Once got the menus, and began to negotiate our choices, we asked for the much discussed (on this board) sommelier. Our server said, "I can help you." My +1 said that she was eager to talk to the sommelier. I am not sure if the person who came over was a sommelier. He was dressed the same as the waiters. He did make suggestions and we took one, which was fine, But the same person took our order, delivered food, cleared our table...so I'm not entirely sure we were guided by a sommelier.

Then, after we ordered, the pacing was lightening fast. Our first course arrived mere nanoseconds after we ordered. Our second course arrived while we were still eating our first course. The server looked flummoxed at first, and we were stunned, but there was a whole fish sitting there and I just didn't know if sending it back would ruin it, or if it would be wasted...so we just accepted it. I know, you'll say we should have asked for a manager, or something, but our experience with the "sommelier" didn't encourage us, and it didn't seem as if other tables were having any more leisurely experiences.

After we ate, and perused the dessert menu, we politely turned down dessert, saying we were full. Then we waited, and waited, and waited, for the opportunity to ask for a check. We finished the wine, drank all the water, visited the loo, looked around expectantly...seriously, more time was required for procurement of the check than we spent arriving, ordering and eating.

The food was uneven. Starters, pasta and side trumped the main, the aforementioned whole sole. The sole was completely unseasoned. It was plain to the point of boring. The unseasonal special of pasta bolognese was delicious. Burrata and squash blossom/mozzarella fritters were both fine. The unexpected winner was the side dish of summer corn with tomatoes and basil.

I don't get the hype. it's possible we had an off night. But a place like that, under the spotlight can't really have too many bad nights. I really wanted to love it, and I couldn't find any reason to love it.

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Finally made it to Fiola and had a delicious, very rich dinner. By course:

Seared Hudson Valley foie gras with figs, port and Sicilian pistachios ($26) -- A medium sized lobe of foie, barely caramelized and sitting atop some sort of sponge cake (brioche?) soaked in a port sauce. Pistachios added a nice crunch; so did the pea shoots. A paste (mushroom?) came dabbed on the side, and was intensely flavorful. For the price, this is not the biggest piece of foie -- but it's been a long time since I've had seared foie, so perhaps I'm thinking of pre-recession portions in a nostalgic light. And the accoutrements made it a winner overall.

I Vincisgrassi ($27) -- I love lasagnas (making my own with Bolognese and bechamel is a favorite winter pastime) and passed on several excellent-sounding pastas (smoked gnocchi with summer truffles?ohmy.gif) to try this version. And there's really nothing *not* to like: the filling was decadent, the top layer was beautifully crisped with baked cheese, and the foam was an extra layer of richness that permeated every bite. That said, I think I would've enjoyed it a lot more if it was a colder month.

Bombolini ($10) -- Six or seven inconceivably light donut balls, dusted in sugar. Served with vanilla cream and compote (maybe blueberry) -- the latter is the best combination. Just the right hint of ricotta. Having recently been to Bayou Bakery and tasting their excellent beignets, these donuts -- despite being filled instead of hollow -- were just as light. I rarely get dessert, but this is a must order. The mignardises at the end of the meal were also impressive.

Unfortunately, this place is a little too expensive to put in my regular rotation (I know, I ordered a foie gras starter -- but scanning the menu, appetizers averaged around $19, pastas around $27, and entrees around $35). But I'll definitely be back, and I'm sure this restaurant will be even better in the coming months.

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Finally made it to Fiola and had a delicious...

Unfortunately, this place is a little too expensive to put in my regular rotation .

The perfect quote for me to use in a first review. Fiola is at the higher end of the price spectrum. Knowing that, I used my not-so-innovative approach of trying it for lunch first. The idea there being if it's really great for lunch then I'll feel more confident going for dinner, bringing some friends with me, spending more, etc. If it really disappoints for lunch, then I wait until reading/hearing much more before taking a bigger risk with dinner, if ever. Wish I had done this with Bourbon Steak a few months ago where four of us had dinner and felt like blooming idiots for doing so (separate post on that already on that thread).

So, with some different--but generally positive feedback about Fiola on record already, headed there today for lunch with a business contact (just two of us: minimize risk :mellow: ). Fiola has now been open 3 months, so I'll include both pros and cons.

HEADLINE

Expensive + very good (great at times) = Decent Value. Certainly saw enough to go back for dinner.

VENUE

- Minor nit: their address. Mostly my fault because I'd never been to Le Paradou and didn't map this online before going. The 601 Penn address makes no sense because it's not on Penn and Capital Grille has the same address. Doesn't seem like it's even the same building. But I guess that's a USPS issue. Sure hope it isn't the restaurant wanting the Penn address rather than Indiana for marketing. I'd think much more important, given who this is, that people can find it easily and not have to do a lap around the block asking when it isn't at 6th and Penn as one might expect. But, again, small ball stuff here.

- It's beautiful. While not surprising given the Chef and what Maestro was, still very nice. Today's weather allowed for outdoor dining on the patio. We didn't do that but noted it. The space is both elegant and comfortable.

FOOD

Always the most important category, count me as a Fiola fan eager to get to know it better. We got the more expensive ($26) of two lunch specials. Called the "Business Express," it offers a nice set of options that would be 50% higher or more if ordered a la carte. They also have a $19 special which, again, seemed to offer very nice options including a snapper main, house made spaghetti with chilis and artichokes and two interesting gelato options. BTW, menus are online for more detail at www.fioladc.com

So, we had:

- Misticanza salad with farm greens, radish, pickled red onion and ricotta crostini. Thought this good but not great. Lots of different greens--maybe even a bit too many and slightly underdressed. The ricotta crostini was delicious.

- Arctic char with some type of farro. Excellent. Perfectly cooked for us though I could see some saying it was even a bit undercooked. Given the quality of the fish, I loved it the way it was. The farro with seasonings was the perfect complement. Wish I could describe this more but failed to take notes as I sometimes do. We both agreed this was worth the price of the special alone.

- Half portion Papardelle with wild mushrooms and parmagiano ($15.50). I alone added this course, wanting to try a pasta. Delicious with generous portion of mushrooms and toothy satisfying pasta. Somewhat expensive given what it was but I really enjoyed it.

- For dessert, we both ordered the "Zuppa Inglese." I liked this. My lunch companion loved it. We both agreed it was fresh, light, refreshing for summer with nice berries, cream and a thin shortbready thing at the bottom of the glass in which it was served. To my taste, I'd have liked it even better if it didn't have as much (or any) shaved ice on top which just seemed to dilute and distract from the great ingredients. Also, I'd have liked the shortbread to be more integrated in the dish. As it was, it was a surprise to see it down there after getting through all the ice, cream and berries. But different people will have different views on that as we did.

SERVICE

Very attentive and professional as one would expect. I asked the waiter for his input as to which of two pasta half courses he'd recommend between the papardelle ($15.50) and the "Cacio i pepe" spaghetti at approximately $4 less. After first suggesting the most expensive option of a pasta with shrimp (I'd told him I simply wanted to try the pasta, had already ordered a seafood main...) he instantly suggested the papardelle over the spaghetti in a way that had me feeling a bit like he was partly comp'ed on ticket size. In retrospect, I loved what he suggested but might have been better off with the spaghetti given my objective and what else I'd ordered.

VALUE

Pretty good. Inasmuch as I think about "value" as simply 'what you get for what you pay,' Fiola seems to be a high-end restaurant putting out appropriately thoughtful, attractive, interesting and generally delicious food. It wouldn't be part of my "regular rotation" either but it is a place I'd go back to periodically assuming dinner is as I hope and expect it to be, .

Thumbs up on a first experience with Fiola. At $74 pre tax and tip without any drinks, it's an expensive place. But I experienced enough to go back for a full bore dinner and look forward to it.

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Banco   

Wife's birthday dinner this Saturday at Fiola, then off to the Fringe Festival. I'm looking very much forward to trying this place, esp. in view of all the positive commentary here. Anything in particular I should not miss?

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ktmoomau   

Too busy today to type a long review, but the food was awesome. It was very loud though, but we still enjoyed it. Duck Duo very good, mushroom pasta I shouldn't have eaten was fantastic, as was the roll I shouldn't have eaten. And I could have taken a whole bag of the chocolate chip macarons. But will post a detailed report later!

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