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[interestingly enough, a search on this forum for the word "Chili" brings up a majority of Asian restaurants (Thai chilis, Chili crab, etc.). That says a lot about the culinary diversity of this group. Now, if we could only find a bowl of damned chili. :(]

(In the same vein as above, you might like the Green Chili Pork Stew at Tap and Vine.)

But for a bowl of chili, you could try Cowboy Cafe or Urban Bar-B-Que.

Cheers,

Rocks.

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Personally I'd head straight to Hard Times (unless you are vegetarian -then don't go there. The veg chili there is not worth the trip). That said, Ben's Chili Bowl also has fantastic chili (especially on top of a half-smoke).

Hard Times has a good variety of types, and great beers to accompany them.

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You read my mind about cooking vs eating.

But I have to say I was amazed to see that Rovers2000 mentioned chili mac. I grew up thinking that was a regional (midwestern) thing...I'm vaguely tempted to track it down and try it now. :P

I feel like its becoming more and more common in the area. As I referenced, Bourbon definitely has it but I feel like I've seen it at multiple places in DC/VA (of course, I can't remember any of them off the top of my head... :( )

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Clyde's may not be so impressive overall, but I still love their chili. Pretty sure it's available at all their locations. Plus the recipe is online (and extremely simple), and it's come out well the three or four times I've made it.

What I had for lunch at the Gallery Place Clyde’s was overly sweet with a hit of heat but no real flavor, to make matters worse the quantity of beans overwhelmed the miniscule amount of meat present in the cup. Might have been the worst chili I have had outside of Wendy’s.

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I'll put in a plug for the IBA (India Brown Ale) Chili at Dogfish Head Alehouse. I've only ever had it as a side with chips for dipping when I've ordered the Alehouse Bratwurst, but it's also offered as an appetizer (in two sizes) topped with gorgonzola and sour cream, which sounds damn good.

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This recent crappy weather had me craving chili. I stopped at Hard times on the way home hoping to get lucky (chili-wise). everything about the stop (Hard Times Germantown, btw) was as bad as could be. The bartender sucked, the drink sucked, and the chili sucked, but I digress. It led me to ask:

Is there any really good chili in this town? including suburbs. Rich, complex,spicy, layered and beefy. Anything worth a trip? Do not mention Ben's unless you want to fight.

I figure not, given that the last post here is 2 1/2 years old there appears to be not much interest. Don't a lot of other cities have a much more advanced chili culture? Since, theoretically, chili is such an all american dish shouldn't we as the capital of this America (U.S. of, (I once dated an Argentine who took great umbrage with our use of plain "America")) have some major representation in the chili wars.

Who wins that DC101 thing? Do they sell it?

Please help. I am Jonesing hard and am willing to travel.

-Heineman

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I've given up. I admit that I don't like spicy so I'm not interested in the folks that go crazy with heat.

I make my own. Well kind of. I take the Hard Times Cincinnati seasoning packets, two pounds of whatever ground meat I have, follow the package directions, add a can of pureed pumpkin, add extra vinegar and enjoy. If I let the five year old "help" there will be black beans as well.

He'd eat it every night for dinner if I let him...

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This recent crappy weather had me craving chili. I stopped at Hard times on the way home hoping to get lucky (chili-wise). everything about the stop (Hard Times Germantown, btw) was as bad as could be. The bartender sucked, the drink sucked, and the chili sucked, but I digress. It led me to ask:

Is there any really good chili in this town? including suburbs. Rich, complex,spicy, layered and beefy. Anything worth a trip? Do not mention Ben's unless you want to fight.

I figure not, given that the last post here is 2 1/2 years old there appears to be not much interest. Don't a lot of other cities have a much more advanced chili culture? Since, theoretically, chili is such an all american dish shouldn't we as the capital of this America (U.S. of, (I once dated an Argentine who took great umbrage with our use of plain "America")) have some major representation in the chili wars.

Who wins that DC101 thing? Do they sell it?

Please help. I am Jonesing hard and am willing to travel.

-Heineman

There are several good chilis in this town, but since I haven't been thinking about them, I'm in no position to list the restaurants that have it, but here's a start:

Family Meal has a Venison Chili with Masa Cornbread ($9.99) that is probably wonderful.

Cowboy Cafe has Texas Chili ($7.50, with or without beans) which may be worth trying (there's something about the atmosphere here that would probably make chili taste better).

Greek Deli has Homemade Chili ($4.25) on Mondays.

Mitsitam Cafe has Buffalo Chili ($5.75/$6.95) in the Great Plains section.

Harry's has Chili ($4.95) although based on their burger, I wouldn't chance it.

Earl's Sandwiches has All Beef Chili ($3.59/$4.49/$5.39).

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everything about the stop (Hard Times Germantown, btw) was as bad as could be. The bartender sucked, the drink sucked, and the chili sucked, but I digress. It led me to ask:

Is there any really good chili in this town? including suburbs. Rich, complex,spicy, layered and beefy. Anything worth a trip?

I'm eating the Border Springs lamb chili at Union Market once a week. I would say it is layered with a kick of spice, but not super-spicy. Grab a bowl, get a drink from Rachel Sergi at Buffalo & Bergen, or from JP Fetherston at Rappahannock Oyster Bar, and I'm sure you'll won't get a bartender who sucks, either.

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Over the last two days I had the beef chili and turkey chili at Earl's. While I love traditional chili, Earl's turkey chili was spectacular and the beef chili so-so in my book. The turkey chili is hot and spicy with large chunks of turkey and white beans. Very special. Chewy, chunky, hot, warming. It makes the winter cold bearable. Had it at the original location.

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I had a bowl of the Venison chili at Family Meal and although well made, it was not satisfying, due to its dry crumbly texture. I may be waaaay off base, but I crave something with viscosity, and a more satisfying moist mouth feel. I think the dry, crumbly ones should be relegated to hot dogs and frito pies, which surely have their merits. All of the photos I see of competition chilis are always wet and appear to flow with moisture. Is this the ideal, I am new with this obsession. Moisture seems to add to the satisfaction potential. We should talk about spicy heat level later.

I am off to Chubby's for a bowl, then probably to Urban BBQ, I should be ready for work then.

After eating 4 different chilis (including my own at the bar last night) in 24 hours, I am starting to feel the way Darkstar965 does about coffee.

Edited to add:

I found these characteristics for Red Chili from the International Chili Society:

TASTE Taste, above all else is the most important factor. The taste should consist of the combination of the meat, peppers, spices, etc, with no particular ingredient being dominant, but rather a blend of the flavors.

CONSISTENCY Chili must have a good ratio between sauce and meat. It should not be dry, watery, grainy, lumpy, or greasy.

AROMA Chili should smell good. This also indicates what is in store when you taste it.

COLOR Chili should look appetizing. Reddish brown is generally accepted as good. Chili is not yellow or green.

BITE Bite or after taste is the heat created by the various type of chili peppers and chili spices.

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I cannot really comment on chilis out at restaurants (I rarely order it, if ever). But, for a home cooked recipe, we tried this one recently and it is EASILY my absolute current favorite chili. It is fantastic. Heat in a warming/tingling sort of way and never approaching the annoying, obnoxious, obvious hit you in the head with a two by four variety.

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/recipes/2012/10/24/dark-pot-roast-chili/

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A week ago I had a lovely, snowy drive to Emmitsburg to partake of the Chubby's bowl. It was very nice to chat with Tom for over an hour as the snow fell. Good to hear about how the business is evolving out there near PA. The chili had a lot of well cooked flavors, nice color and a long simmered flavor with a good meat to sauce ratio (to my taste). No beans, A bit of tomato. Too much reliance on dried spices, and unfortunately a batch that was about to be replaced with a newer one, so the meat chunks were shredded. Seems this will be a problem; the reheating of chili develops the flavor more fully, but the texture declines with each reheating. It will be interesting to see how different restaurants handle this conundrum. A very nice bowl, especially to add to a meal of the cue if you are nearby (Grotto visit, anyone?).

Andrew Evans' BBQ Joint in Easton has a Bowl of Red is as completely different as can be. Lots of beans, multiple types even, Lots of tomato, not nearly as long cooking. Kind of like a fresh, quick cooked alternative. Broth was thin and much less rich. Not the resolved rich one I seek, but with some salt it was satisfying in a chili soup kind of way. The fatty Brisket however is off the hook. Really good. Lots of people should stop here to eat it on their way to the shore.

Jeff

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If one were considering doing it commercially (which God I hope Mr. Heineman's recent monomaniacal pursuit of chili-- all the way to Emmitsburg, for a bowl, Easton for another-- might be a harbinger of) I've always thought one might consider sort of a solera concept: a portion of yesterday's chili is retained, a new full batch added each day or two, so that the good effects of the reheating process he so accurately describes are reaped, but the negative textural side effects minimalized.

The never-ending chili pot. Like sourdough starters, or yeast for medieval beer brewers.

I had a girlfriend from New Orleans who did this with her red beans, for the de rigueur Monday red beans and rice dinner...to me this meant the last bowl of her red beans and rice I ate also contained a bit of the first one.

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I've always thought one might consider sort of a solera concept: a portion of yesterday's chili is retained, a new full batch added each day or two, so that the good effects of the reheating process he so accurately describes are reaped, but the negative textural side effects minimalized.

The never-ending chili pot. Like sourdough starters, or yeast for medieval beer brewers.

Sounds interesting. Might have to work around the pesky Food Borne illness thing to appease the Health Lady, but interesting nonetheless.

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When it's cold out, and I'm craving chili, I still make my poor college student version of chili. Brown hamburger meat in a skillet, add a can of baked beans, add various seasonings, cook it for a long time, serve on top of a cheddar cheese-covered baked potato with more cheese on top.

Then prepare to pass out.

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When it's cold out, and I'm craving chili, I still make my poor college student version of chili. Brown hamburger meat in a skillet, add a can of baked beans, add various seasonings, cook it for a long time, serve on top of a cheddar cheese-covered baked potato with more cheese on top.

Then prepare to pass out.

In the realm of make-at-home, I find Bush's Chili Magic chili starter (basically seasoned beans in a can) to be passable, if a little salty, and certainly quick and easy to make. I try to "healthy it up" by using ground turkey breast and no-salt-added diced tomatoes, and serving over brown rice.

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My dad swears by this recipe, and no one in the family doesn't love it.

.5 lb ground beef

.5 lb pork sage sausage

1 medium onion chopped

2 clove garlic minced

1 pint tomatoes( hopefully home canned)

1 can red kidney beans

3/4 cup tomato juice

1 4oz can chopped green chilis( old El Paso)

1 tbsp Worcestershire

2 tsp paprika( not the fancy smoked stuff)

1 tsp sugar

1 tsp salt

1 tsp dried oregano

1/2 tsp ground cumin

1/4 tsp celery salt

1/4 tsp cayenne

1/4 tsp black pepper

1/8 tsp dry mustard

Couple drops Tabasco

Just fry the meat and onion, drain fat add everything else and simmer for a bit, then let cool and reheat before you eat it. Soo much better that way.

We grew up on this recipe and still do. We make chili nachos chili fries or just a bowl. Sometimes if we're at the farm and its like 6 degrees or something we add a little peanut butter to keep us going strong outside.

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The chili at Urban BBQ is really heading in the right direction. Nice sauciness, good heat that grows as you work through the bowl, good, well developed flavor with a fair amount of layers. Some tomato, well integrated into the sauce. No over reliance on dried spices. Very nice and heading toward the competition type chili I seek. It does have a lot of beans and I understand how that might be a necessity from a business perspective. Good bowl to get if you are in that part of Rockville, as I don't know if the recipe applies to the other locations.

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The chili at Urban BBQ is really heading in the right direction. Nice sauciness, good heat that grows as you work through the bowl, good, well developed flavor with a fair amount of layers. Some tomato, well integrated into the sauce. No over reliance on dried spices. Very nice and heading toward the competition type chili I seek. It does have a lot of beans and I understand how that might be a necessity from a business perspective. Good bowl to get if you are in that part of Rockville, as I don't know if the recipe applies to the other locations.

Jeff, did your guys at Grapeseed give you the chili and pork butt I dropped off last Thursday, I ate lunch at Freddy's, great Lobster Roll!

Tom

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Had the 4 way texas chili mac at hard times, for the first time in ages. It reminded me why I preferred the tastes of HT's Cincinnati which is more tomatoish. gotta admit I do like chili on spaghetti in general. the texas is dryer and grittier with a reasonable but not overbearing level of spices.

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Chili- I almost hate to weigh in on this, because mine is definitely down market- ground beef or bison, or other meats, if I have them (I've made an awesome venison chili in the past), sautéed w/ green onions, add fresh chiles if I have them, Rotel tomatoes, real chile powder-chipotle/ancho, garlic, more tomatoes (canned, usually), beans-kidney & black beans, served w/ rice & cornbread...

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Man! This is one of those topics I just somehow missed but shouldn't have. I love a great chili too but have to take issue with two of Mr. Heineman's claims. First, likening chili to coffee. Or, more accurately, his single minded and only recently shared obsession with finding great chili to my longer standing pursuit of coffee knowledge, coffee places and what's in the cup. Not much to say about that but, okay, we'll go with it. We've both got some defective genes clearly. :D

I love a great chili but it's not as big a deal for me as, say, I don't know, coffee or milkshakes maybe. :D Think I've always assumed this is something only great when made at home. The more cynical part of me might have assumed chili is an aside at best or a place to dump a lot of inexpensive whatever to carve back some profit being lost elsewhere when on a restaurant's menu. It's football and fraternity food, after all. But that's not fair. Love Urban but haven't ordered chili there--will the next time. Most interesting but ignored suggestion above to me: Rock's Greek Deli. Sure, Greece isn't known for chili but Kostas knows his way around huge plates of inexpensive, very tasty and satisfying protein/sauce/starch combos (mostly Greek) as well as anyone in this town.

There must be fab chili spots out beyond NoVa but I haven't a clue where. Richmond maybe? C'ville? That southern and western part of the state where the BBQ gets better and the Carolinas appear on the horizon. Winchester?

Final thought. I may have posted on Cincinnati several months ago; not sure. Did some travel there over the past year and will be again this year. Found the classic skyline, chili on soggy spag thing to be really bad wherever we tried it (2 or 3 different attempts at different "strongly recommended" places). That said, no doubt Skyline has been a gold mine for its owner; especially bottom line. But in terms of what comes on the plate, I don't think it's an acquired taste thing. I think it's just bad so, unless you were born into it, I wonder a bit about anyone claiming that's great (or even really good) chili. I'm kidding...but only kind of.

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Man! This is one of those topics I just somehow missed but shouldn't have. I love a great chili too but have to take issue with two of Mr. Heineman's claims. First, likening chili to coffee. Or, more accurately, his single minded and only recently shared obsession with finding great chili to my longer standing pursuit of coffee knowledge, coffee places and what's in the cup. Not much to say about that but, okay, we'll go with it. We've both got some defective genes clearly. :D

I love a great chili but it's not as big a deal for me as, say, I don't know, coffee or milkshakes maybe. :D Think I've always assumed this is something only great when made at home. The more cynical part of me might have assumed chili is an aside at best or a place to dump a lot of inexpensive whatever to carve back some profit being lost elsewhere. But that's not fair. Love Urban but haven't ordered chili there--will now. Most interesting but ignored suggestion above to me: Rock's Greek Deli. Sure, Greece isn't known for chili but Kostas knows his way around big plates of inexpensive, very tasty and satisfying protein/sauce combos (mostly Greek) as well as anyone in this town.

There must be fab chili spots out beyond NoVa but I haven't a clue where. Richmond maybe? C'ville? That southern and western part of the state where the BBQ gets better and the Carolinas appear on the horizon.

Final thought. I may have posted on Cincinnati several months ago; not sure. Did some travel there over the past year and will be again this year. Found the classic skyline, chili on soggy spag thing to be really bad wherever had. I don't think it's an acquired taste thing. I think it's just bad so, unless you were born into it, I wonder a bit about anyone claiming that's great (or even really good) chili. I'm kidding...but only kind of.

From reading these posts nobody seems about to drive a yard for great vegetarian chili. Katharine Mardirosian of 100 Bowls of Soup, I recently discovered, makes a wonderful three bean chili. I bought mine at Organic Butcher in McLean.

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Hmmm, with the deepest of respect for anyone seeking vegetarian chili for whatever reason...to me (and I speak ONLY for myself here), chili is a meat thing. It'd be like getting a dairy-free milkshake. That said, I think one of my buddies in college made a veg chili for a game once and we all had to agree it was pretty good. Maybe that was the beer. Can't remember.

One other random chili thought. My other bone to pick with Jeff. Way up above somewhere he let us know that Andrew Evans version at BBQ Joint (Easton) wasn't so great but the brisket was "off the hook." Geez. I was all ready with a wagging finger feeling sure I'd already dissed the chili in favor of the truly exceptional brisket and other Q on that thread. Turns out, I didn't try or comment on the chili but, sheesh, BBQ Joint is all about the BBQ (though not the pork sandwich). You want great chili? Go to a great Chili Joint. Or make it at home. Kostas?

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Man! This is one of those topics I just somehow missed but shouldn't have. I love a great chili too but have to take issue with two of Mr. Heineman's claims. First, likening chili to coffee. Or, more accurately, his single minded and only recently shared obsession with finding great chili to my longer standing pursuit of coffee knowledge, coffee places and what's in the cup. Not much to say about that but, okay, we'll go with it. We've both got some defective genes clearly. :D

I love a great chili but it's not as big a deal for me as, say, I don't know, coffee or milkshakes maybe. :D Think I've always assumed this is something only great when made at home. The more cynical part of me might have assumed chili is an aside at best or a place to dump a lot of inexpensive whatever to carve back some profit being lost elsewhere when on a restaurant's menu. It's football and fraternity food, after all. But that's not fair. Love Urban but haven't ordered chili there--will the next time. Most interesting but ignored suggestion above to me: Rock's Greek Deli. Sure, Greece isn't known for chili but Kostas knows his way around huge plates of inexpensive, very tasty and satisfying protein/sauce/starch combos (mostly Greek) as well as anyone in this town.

There must be fab chili spots out beyond NoVa but I haven't a clue where. Richmond maybe? C'ville? That southern and western part of the state where the BBQ gets better and the Carolinas appear on the horizon. Winchester?

Final thought. I may have posted on Cincinnati several months ago; not sure. Did some travel there over the past year and will be again this year. Found the classic skyline, chili on soggy spag thing to be really bad wherever we tried it (2 or 3 different attempts at different "strongly recommended" places). That said, no doubt Skyline has been a gold mine for its owner; especially bottom line. But in terms of what comes on the plate, I don't think it's an acquired taste thing. I think it's just bad so, unless you were born into it, I wonder a bit about anyone claiming that's great (or even really good) chili. I'm kidding...but only kind of.

No, no, no. Chili is every bit as important as coffee and milkshakes, and I *love* the fact that we're getting into such detailed, esoteric conversations about all three. It means a lot me because it represents major depth and detail.

Right now, I'm taking a couple of *months* (yes, *months*) out of my life to listen (just listen) to the 10 Beethoven Violin Sonatas. There are 32 movements total (#5 "Spring" and #7 "Eroica" have 4 movements; the rest have 3), and I'm going to know them to the point where you could play a time slice of 5 seconds of any given movement, of any given sonata, and I'll be able to tell you which it is (I hope!) :)

That is the level of detail to which I'm studying these beautiful pieces, which aren't even representative of Beethoven; the first 8 are from his early career, and the last 2 are from his mid career (you can make a case for the 10th being late), but essentially, they're a time slice of early-to-mid Beethoven.

Why am I doing this? For the same reason that people study early Shakespeare (which I did, and boy howdy do Henry VI Parts 1 & 2 suck!), early Cezanne (pictures of his father that hung in his den in Aix-en-Provence), etc. They're important, that's why. And so is chili.

Chili compared with Beethoven? Shakespeare? Cezanne?

Yes, absolutely. I love them all, and I love you all for discussing them in such depth, and with such passion.

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OK. If you're going to pull the old classical music, Shakespearian theater and impressionist masters cards, I have to make clear I was mostly kidding.

Besides, we can't start a topic called "Chili vs Coffee" because it'd be too silly and make no sense on its face. That said (and tongue firmly in cheek here), as an admitted lover of both...er, all three (think I started milkshakes)...chili, while of course worthy of deep, extended and esoteric discourse, is ultimately a dish best had with beer in front of a game. Nose in the bowl. Sustenance. Lots of nuance but one of the best blue collar, distinctively American, classic great dishes. Milkshakes are probably like chili that way. Lots to discuss when describing and supporting preferences but a pedestrian treat. An awesome treat but, like chili, Americana, loved by many (me as much as anyone).

Coffee, on the other hand, is a different deal. It's a hugely global phenomenon (more like wine than like chili or milkshakes). It's as much about its role in history, the places where served, the discussions enabled by it, the aroma/taste dichotomy, the equipment and techniques employed....as it is about the crema, the body, the roast, viscosity, flavor and all that's in the cup...or demitasse (which is not the same thing as the generically termed and highly variable "espresso cup" as shown here).

Cezanne. Rodin. Shakespeare. Beethoven. Chili? :D Cezanne, Rodin and Beethoven drank coffee and probably crafted some of their best works with it or even thanks to it. I challenge anyone to produce a picture, a painting, a bit of research, indicating any of those masters ever came face to face with chili or a milkshake.

Sorry Don, just having a bit of fun with this. :)

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The best vegetarian chili I ever had is no more. It was a staple at the old American Cafe chain from the late 80s, early 90s. Lots of flavor, some beans and a good amount of tvp. There was a location on Wisconsin near M that I frequented when I worked in Georgetown. There was also one on Capitol Hill on Mass Ave.

I loved that stuff. (Again, feeling old...)

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Final thought. I may have posted on Cincinnati several months ago; not sure. Did some travel there over the past year and will be again this year. Found the classic skyline, chili on soggy spag thing to be really bad wherever we tried it (2 or 3 different attempts at different "strongly recommended" places). That said, no doubt Skyline has been a gold mine for its owner; especially bottom line. But in terms of what comes on the plate, I don't think it's an acquired taste thing. I think it's just bad so, unless you were born into it, I wonder a bit about anyone claiming that's great (or even really good) chili. I'm kidding...but only kind of.

I could write a dissertation on the insular culinary thinking in Cincinnati (I went to school there and happen to like soggy spaghetti with Macedonian meat sauce, but certainly know that it's not haute cuisine. More guilty pleasure vessel for cheese and hot sauce delivery apres drinking). Everything that is made in Cincinnati is considered "the best thing in the country" by people born in SW Ohio. People there seriously think that ribs smoked at The Montgomery Inn are superior to anything you can get in Memphis or Kansas City. Cincinnatians are a largely humorless bunch, God bless them. I blame their German roots. ;)

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I could write a dissertation on the insular culinary thinking in Cincinnati (I went to school there and happen to like soggy spaghetti with Macedonian meat sauce, but certainly know that it's not haute cuisine. More guilty pleasure vessel for cheese and hot sauce delivery apres drinking). Everything that is made in Cincinnati is considered "the best thing in the country" by people born in SW Ohio. People there seriously think that ribs smoked at The Montgomery Inn are superior to anything you can get in Memphis or Kansas City. Cincinnatians are a largely humorless bunch, God bless them. I blame their German roots. ;)

That's pretty funny. But I'm not sure you meant all of it to be funny :blink:

Maybe a wee bit too harsh beyond the chili part? On the chili, not at all a question of "haute" versus pedestrian in my view. It's a question of good or great versus bad. I know Cincinnati a bit but don't have the pulse of the people and place that you do having gone to college there. The "best thing in the country" reference is both amusing and interesting. We were there most recently when they had the "Zinzinnati Oktoberfest" going on. We were told by many it was the biggest of its kind outside Munich. It was fairly vast, occupying most of downtown. We believed it. Maybe we shouldn't have.

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