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To my partner's father, who died peacefully but completely unexpectedly Wednesday. He was a relentless optimist who loved seafood and manning the grill and who married the girl (46 years ago) who hate

To Texas State Senator Wendy Davis, who showed us what a filibuster should look like.

I'm resting my aching feet and raising a glass or 6 to all those others on the Mall today.  What a turnout!  What a scene!

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To all the trans women who don't have access to all the makeup artists, hair stylists, wardrobe consultants, world-famous photographers, Photoshop tools, and financial resources as Caitlyn Jenner.

Holy crap, Batman.  That is an unbelievable picture.  On top of everything Tujague posted above, the simple fact that the picture is of a 65 year old is remarkable.  She looks like she is in her early 30's.

After seeing that pic I have a significantly different perspective on Hollywood, makeup, world famous photographers, cosmetic surgery,  photoshop, etc.   Its all magic.

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Max Scherzer, Washington Nationals pitcher. No hitter today. More than that. It's two consecutive games he has taken a perfect game (no walks,no errors, no opponent on base -- very rare) so late into the game. Today he was ONE out away from a perfect game. Pirates batter was hit by a pitch and got to his base.

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Max Scherzer, Washington Nationals pitcher. No hitter today. More than that. It's two consecutive games he has taken a perfect game (no walks,no errors, no opponent on base -- very rare) so late into the game. Today he was ONE out away from a perfect game. Pirates batter was hit by a pitch and got to his base.

Pirates hitter leaned into the pitch so he would be hit, stuck his elbow into the path of the ball.  Totally classless move and he should have been called out by the umpire.

Scherzer has had two fabulous games in a row.  Three base runners in two games, none before the 7th inning.  This was his third complete game in a career where he has won two Cy Young Awards.

I'm going to the game Thursday and hope he's pitching.  With all the injuries, I have no idea what the rotation is now.

I'm happy about the no hitter but if it had been a legitimate hit by a pitch I would be less angry.

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This has been a remarkable week in American public life. I want to raise a glass, first, to President Obama, whose political victories this week rather pale in comparison to the remarkable eulogy he delivered in Charleston today, which is probably the best speech by a president in my lifetime, even though I don't have any belief in any god whatever and he leaned heavily on the god stuff (as Lincoln did in the greatest of all presidential speeches, his 2nd inaugural). For all his faults and failures, and they have been many, Barack Obama can move me to tears, and not just with the soaring poetry in which he sometimes speaks, but with the service he sometimes manages to render to our commonwealth. And second, I raise a glass to that commonwealth, which is stronger and finer today than it was a week ago.

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To Jim Obergefell, who became the face and the voice of marriage equality while grieving the death of his husband. To Justice Kennedy, whose heartfelt language on love and marriage becomes a treasured part of history. To all of the good folks who wished me "happy equality" yesterday. To everyone who fought for this cause, so that little kids will grow up never knowing of a time when their gay parents or gay friends could not be legally married.

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This has been a remarkable week in American public life. I want to raise a glass, first, to President Obama, whose political victories this week rather pale in comparison to the remarkable eulogy he delivered in Charleston today, which is probably the best speech by a president in my lifetime, even though I don't have any belief in any god whatever and he leaned heavily on the god stuff (as Lincoln did in the greatest of all presidential speeches, his 2nd inaugural). For all his faults and failures, and they have been many, Barack Obama can move me to tears, and not just with the soaring poetry in which he sometimes speaks, but with the service he sometimes manages to render to our commonwealth. And second, I raise a glass to that commonwealth, which is stronger and finer today than it was a week ago.

President Obama did yesterday what every good preacher is taught to do: speak a word appropriate to the time and place. The God language was utterly appropriate to the AME Church, and he arguably could have gone even farther in terms of using Jesus language, but he stayed more in a lightly civil religion mode. One of my friends, who is something of a radical activist and academic, complained that he didn't go far enough in terms of taking on racist structures, but again, this person was no more the primary audience for this eulogy than you or I were. He spoke specifically to Mother Emanuel and its lost pastor and souls; we just listened in. Overall, it was masterful, and even reading it left me in tears. For all his flaws, he is the only president in my lifetime that I have genuinely loved--when he gets it right, he really nails it like no other.

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To Jim Obergefell, who became the face and the voice of marriage equality while grieving the death of his husband. To Justice Kennedy, whose heartfelt language on love and marriage becomes a treasured part of history. To all of the good folks who wished me "happy equality" yesterday. To everyone who fought for this cause, so that little kids will grow up never knowing of a time when their gay parents or gay friends could not be legally married.

I know I'm going "political"   but I also drink to Obergefell and this event.   I view this as one of the great steps to equality in my lifetime and awareness.  In '69, living in the NYC area, visiting the Village, being around the age of 18 and able to drink legally in NY, I was aware of Stonewall.  I suppose I was completely homophobic, had no understanding of the issue, no comprehension of what people went through hiding their sexual orientation, etc etc.  Completely ignorant to the issue.   Decades of learning, exposure, learning,,....and learning more and more, completely changed that personal perspective.  Witnessing people die of aids before the advent of medical cocktails that prevented AIDS was truly horrific, especially in light of a political culture at that time (80's) that limited research to fight that disease.

More recently seeing and experiencing the revolutionary and completely different perspective from a majority of younger people, whose overwhelming egalitarian perspective radically expedited a rush toward US societal acceptance of LGBT and moved toward acceptance of Gay Marriage.   A great transformation in my book.

Its worth many toasts, in my perspective.

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To the entire US womens soccer team.

Its a remarkable team, in a remarkable sport.   Beautiful comments from team members after the victory.  Very team oriented.  They deserve kudo's.

The goals were cool.  A lot of classic, beautiful, and fortuitous goals, but they come after attempting the same or similar plays again and again and again.  Kudo's.  The long goal was something else.  Sharp, almost funny, very perceptive, as Carli Lloyd saw the goalie way way way out of position and drove the long shot over her!!!!!

How cool was that?   Biggest game of the entire year and an extraordinary shot while noticing a big hole/weakness.  Kudo's again.   Not exceptional in its play but thoroughly exceptional in awareness and execution to drive that shot and get that speed, length and height at the right moment.

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Her name is Reese Rebecca Hofman :).

Our choices from the Quintarelli are:

2004 Amarone

2005 Albert

2000 Amarone Selection do Giuseppe

However - we spent Saturday at Glen Manor visiting Kelly bc my wife wanted a "taste" to celebrate passing 38 weeks. So technically her first taste was a bit of Holder Hill!

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However - we spent Saturday at Glen Manor visiting Kelly bc my wife wanted a "taste" to celebrate passing 38 weeks. So technically her first taste was a bit of Holder Hill!

I ain't talkin about your wife, bro! And a molecule of wine passing through the placenta doesn't count.

Congratulations, btw!!!

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To my late brother-in-law, O.Z. Tyler.  This write up about him is from the Owensboro, KY, Messenger-Inquirer:  Tyler "finally got the Kentucky distillery he had deamed of"”on what wold have been his 81st birthday.  But Tyler, who invented the TerrePURE  process to speed the aging of bourbon, along with his stepson"¦died in January 2014 before his dream could be realized.  More than 100 people turned out "¦to see the dedication of"¦Kentucky's new O. Z. Tyler Distillery at 10 Distillery Road."

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To Julian Bond and Jonathan Daniels, icons of social justice and symbols of hope at very early ages, both of whose lives ended too soon in their own ways, one to vascular disease and one by a racist with a gun.

I hadn't been to this thread in a while, and hadn't heard that Julian Bond had died until earlier today on the radio. I didn't know him, but he came to American University, where I labored for 20 years, as a distinguished visiting professor in the early 1990s, during my employment there. During the "first Gulf War" in 1991, he participated in a forum at AU that I attended, and I have to say he was one of the most impressive men I've ever encountered. He led a fine and exemplary life, and I raise a glass to his memory.

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To Donald Capps. He likely means little to people on this forum, but I edited four books by this brilliant Princeton Theological Seminary professor, who was one of the loveliest--and quirkiest--people it has ever been my pleasure to know and work with. He wrote openly of his struggles with social phobia, which made communicating with him a challenge, and he was a lifelong holdout on producing his manuscripts on a typewriter, not a word processor. The brother of the late Congressman Walter Capps and brother-in-law of current California congresswoman Lois Capps, often called the "nicest person in Congress." Don maybe was the nicest person in the world of theology--a heartbreaking end to a distinguished career.

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Gerry Hayden.  An employer then friend for the better part of 14 years.  He suffered and held on tenaciously far longed than most would and was generous enough to re-introduce me to the burgeoning bounty of the North Fork, where he moved out to dry out, though he sneaked a drink or 2 in near the end, as well he deserved to. I am pleased to have helped him in his time of need, even if he wasn't to sweet on all the "French shit".

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