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Tiki-taka certainly uses the possession style that Cruyff popularized, but he was famous while at Ajax for "total football" (which he didn't invent, but he gets full credit for spreading to the modern game). Prior to this, positions were very rigid - you had attackers, midfielders, and defenders. In total football, the positions are more fluid, and the current influence can be seen in teams using outside defenders as flank players to support the offense.

Thank you.

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To my partner's father, who died peacefully but completely unexpectedly Wednesday. He was a relentless optimist who loved seafood and manning the grill and who married the girl (46 years ago) who hate

To Texas State Senator Wendy Davis, who showed us what a filibuster should look like.

I'm resting my aching feet and raising a glass or 6 to all those others on the Mall today.  What a turnout!  What a scene!

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Thank you.

Whenever you see a defender cross from the side of the box while a midfielder drops back to cover the gap, or a defensive midfielder make a run into the box while a forward drops behind him to clog the center of the field in case of a turnover, raise a glass to Cruyff.

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Whenever you see a defender cross from the side of the box while a midfielder drops back to cover the gap, or a defensive midfielder make a run into the box while a forward drops behind him to clog the center of the field in case of a turnover, raise a glass to Cruyff.

Thank you.  Very accurate.  When I watched Cruyff in the US he was also a masterful short passer, then mover into empty space getting the ball back and further advancing it.  I guess that is a type of precursor to the tiki-taka style...but he is far better known for the total game with skilled players capable of playing all positions and flowing through the field.

So last evening I toasted Cruyff while watching Maryland slowly but surely get buried by Kansas.  (wait till next year)

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Jennifer Frey, former WaPo reporter.

I always loved her stuff and missed her when she left the Post.

Only 47 and survivors include her 17 year old daughter.

Damn...

I hadn't seen this.  I loved her writing.   Very sad.

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Merle Haggard, RIP

http://www.wsmv.com/story/31658132/country-music-legend-merle-haggard-dies-at-79

Silver Wings

His influence was felt in Cajun country. This is a French version of Okie from Muskogee called I'm Happy to be a Cajun from Church Point:

http://www.npmusic.org/Un_Tit_Repeat_Dessus_le_Cadien_de_Church_Point.mp3

"And the love is the biggest thrill of all!"

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I'll raise a glass to Muhammed Ali who passed away several days ago.  He was an epochal figure for our times, though the prime period when he was a world wide revered figure peaked during the 1960's and 70's and inched its way into the earlier 1980's.  By the mid '80's he was diagnosed with Parkinson's.  Its impact hampered and then eliminated his ability to effectively communicate with the outside world for the last 30 years.  He was also a highly controversial figure in the United States during the 60's and 70's.  But Ali had a lovable and transformative soul.  So so many of those that hated Ali from his earliest controversial period grew to love and appreciate the man.  He was a man of love, dignity and respected all races and creeds in a universal way.  The 3 people who will speak at his funeral include ex President Clinton, Bryant Gumbel and Billy Crystal (of all people).  No members of Islam there despite his highly controversial conversion to Islam in 1964.  Ali transcended all races and creeds.

Yes he was a one of a kind amazingly talented boxer...never before or since has one so big been so fast and artful in the ring...and yet so violent and brutal as the sport demands.  But beyond that Muhammed Ali was the toast of the entire world, the planet's most famous and revered individual, and one who broke bread and shared time with among others Mother Teresa and the Dalai Lama not to mention some mean arse big hitters like Sonny Liston, Joe Frazier and George Foreman.  Just imagine that...an individual who shared center stage with a brutish Sonny Liston and a holy Mother Teresa and fit the part in both places.

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"All mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated...As therefore the bell that rings to a sermon, calls not upon the preacher only, but upon the congregation to come: so this bell calls us all: but how much more me, who am brought so near the door by this sickness....No man is an island, entire of itself...any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee."

-- John Donne, 1624

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On November 3, 2009 at 8:42 PM, jparrott said:

Len Bias. I was 8 and playing in my yard when I heard. Grew up a lot that day. The ESPN doc airing right now brings a lot of that back.

30 years ago today. I remember this so vividly. I was a grad student at Maryland.  We got a notice in our mailboxes not to talk to the media.  I watched him play at Cole Field House a few times.  He wore a fur coat to walk across campus. I remember someone pointing him out to me once.

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On 6/14/2016 at 2:39 PM, DonRocks said:

"All mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated...As therefore the bell that rings to a sermon, calls not upon the preacher only, but upon the congregation to come: so this bell calls us all: but how much more me, who am brought so near the door by this sickness....No man is an island, entire of itself...any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee."

-- John Donne, 1624

To the Orlando first responders:

"After Orlando Shooting, First Responders Grapple with Psychological Toll" by Morgan Winsor, Julie Barzilay, and Dr, Amy Glick on abcnews.go.com

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Ralph Stanley. What a treasure of a musician and singer he was!

This was him on banjo singing that high harmony on the song Rank Stranger. His brother Carter Stanley is singing lead.

This song is an old one by Albert E. Brumley, the same preacher who wrote songs you know like I'll Fly Away, Turn Your Radio On, I'll Meet You in the Morning. Well, if you listen to country music you might know them.

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To Fred Hellerman.  From today's Times:  "Fred Hellerman, a singer, guitarist and songwriter and the last surviving member of the Weavers, the quartet that in the 1950s helped usher in the folk music revival, died on Thursday at his home in Weston, Conn. He was 89."

I'll listen to the Weavers a bit today and remember my visits to the Village in the 1960s.

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2 hours ago, Keithstg said:

To Richard Keane and Bill Meehan.

20 minutes ago, DaveO said:

To my old friend Dave Nelson who was murdered in the World Trade Center 15 years ago.

Absolutely to all who were directly and indirectly affected by the attacks. And I'll also go ahead and wish a happy 48th birthday to Member Number One.

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On 9/20/2016 at 1:36 AM, dcandohio said:

To my dad. 89 years young, diagnosed with cancer, who just announced he is refusing chemo.  And he told us all, upon making his decision, that he hoped he did not disappoint us. No way Dad, no way. ?

I would do the exact same thing.

Get him in hospices now while he's healthy. It'll be the best decision you make.

I have a friend with a 90-year-old father who is diagnosed with rapidly worsening congestive heart failure, and he made the same choice. Modern medicine is great at keeping people alive; not so great at keeping them alive *with quality of life*.

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Buck Wheat!

"Stanley Dural, Jr. - Founder of Buckwheat Zydeco, Dies at 68" by Jon Pareles on nytimes.com

He was a jolly guy! I had the pleasure of introducing him and his band, Ils Sont Partis (They're Off!), at the Twist and Shout club in Bethesda, in French! He got a kick out of that and said I could introduce him any time he came to town! He was a big draw at Twist and Shout 1 and 2 and the Tornado Alley. A natural progression from Clifton Chenier's blues to Buck's soul and Rhythm and Blues base. I even remember him playing organ in Clif's Red Hot Louisiana Band when Clif was getting sick. What an entertainer! One of us? No, he was one of a kind!

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1 hour ago, goodeats said:

CUBS WIN!!!! To ending 71 years of waiting and on a terrific double play....:wub:

It has been fated that the Cubs are going all the way this year - I'm happy for you, Mary!

Not being facetious, but has it only been 71 years? Hell, the Nationals are nearly 20% of the way to that!

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21 hours ago, John William G said:

Leon Russell, great song writer, piano player and singer.  Here is one of his best songs, “A Song for You,” which he first recorded in 1970.  Russell was one day older than me.  So many people I have known and/or admired are dying.

I'm a few years younger.  At this stage 5,6,7,8 years aren't much different.  My contemporaries are also passing away.  Always depressing news.  Always. 

Leon Russell:  I enjoyed his works.  Talented musician and fun singer.  He could handle different types of music and blend them.

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John Glenn.  

A Buckeye, and a real American hero.  I had the distinct pleasure of meeting him at one of the thousands of events he attended at Ohio State over the course of his career.   He was unassuming, and sweet, and humble.  Huge loss for America, but especially for our OSU community.

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21 hours ago, dcandohio said:

John Glenn.  

A Buckeye, and a real American hero.  I had the distinct pleasure of meeting him at one of the thousands of events he attended at Ohio State over the course of his career.   He was unassuming, and sweet, and humble.  Huge loss for America, but especially for our OSU community.

And an additional acknowledgement to his wife, Annie:  Beautiful story

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