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DGS Delicatessen, Chef Barry Koslow and GM Brian Zipin in Dupont Circle

Dupont Circle South Dupont Jewish Deli Homemade Corned Beef Homemade Pastrami

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#51 DonRocks

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:07 PM

 I can't imagine calling DGS "one of the best restaurants that Dupont Circle has ever seen" as Don did. Not with Nora, Eola. Komi, Sushi Taro and Obelisk all crowding that tier. 

 

You know, when I said that, I really meant the Connecticut Avenue corridor, not the west (Obelisk) or east (Komi, Sushi Taro). So, I would call this my mistaken geological perspective (that said, I barely consider 17th Street to be Dupont Circle, so Komi and Sushi Taro are, in my mind, somewhere off in their own neighborhood (yes, I know I have them listed at East Dupont Circle)).


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#52 ad.mich

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:43 PM

PS - Not that he's entirely objective, but Brian Zipin swears to me that DGS Delicatessen has the best brunch in town.

 

I don't know about that (not much of a bruncher myself), but I do know that when we dropped in last weekend we were pretty pleased.  I had seen shakshuka on the menu but only for brunch.  The idea of someone else making me shakshuka sounded perfect, and the version on the DGS brunch menu didn't disappoint.  It had the peppery bite I like and depth of flavor that comes from a good slow simmer.  Only thing that would have made it better would have been if I popped both yolks right out the gate before the residual heat got to the second one, but I was so deep in my happy place after the first bite that I wasn't thinking straight.  

 

My dining companion got the eggs benedict with smoked salmon on latkes.  The latkes had a very noticeable onion flavor to me - cool by me but I know not everyone is into that.  Well cooked for sure though.  As mentioned above the smoked salmon is very high quality.  

 

The brunch items come without accompaniment, and the sides we ordered were a mixed bag.  The patatas bravas a la judea had really well prepared potatoes but a weirdly small topping of sour cream and just a small scoop of harissa in the middle.  Weird presentation and uneven amount of topping that left the harissa to dominate over everything.  The crispy fried pastrami should be scrapped entirely as a side.  It came thick cut like a rasher and the time spent on the flat top just made it tighten up and make all the fat that makes pastrami so amazing suddenly work against it.  Chewy and not good.  I understand the desire to put breakfast meat on the menu (hell, I ordered it) but this just didn't work.

 

My egg cream was better than any my dad ever made me.  The mimosa was a mimosa with St. Germain in it.  I wish it weren't the case but if brunch is the only time I can get the shakshouka I will tough it up and keep coming back.  Maybe I'll just get a takeout pastrami sandwich for the road.


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#53 rkduggins

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 10:02 AM

Went with a girlfriend last night. We started with cocktails, the Hello Gorgeous for me and the Mazel Tov for her. I liked the sherry and orange combination in mine and would definitely get again. She wasn't as keen on hers, but I didn't taste it, so can't comment. We split the pastrami sandwich, Brussels Sprouts and potato latkes... Or should I say INHALED. I really liked the grapes that were roasted in with the sprouts. The pastrami was thick, tender and delicious with just the right amount of mustard and the rye bread was a flavorful counterpoint. I also noticed onion in the latkes, but since this is perfectly in tune with my taste, thought it wonderful.

 

Service was friendly and attentive. We had a lot to catch up on and didn't feel rushed at all even though the restaurant was filling up around us. I'll be back for sure!


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#54 Twinsdaddy

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:49 PM

Had lunch at DGS today with my brother, who lives in NYC and is good friends with the former executive chef at Kutsher's Tribeca, Mark Spangenthal. We agreed that our lunch at DGS was very good. The highlights were the smoked bluefish and chopped liver apps, and our combo pastrami-corned beef sandwich. All very good. The lowlight was the pickle plate, which was definitely a walk on the mild side.

 

As Don suggested upthread (but on my own) I wrapped the last of the chopped liver in the radicchio leaf, and of course it was delicious. But the rye bread was very good too.

 

We had a nice chat with who I think must have been GM Brian Zipin; he obviously could tell we're a couple of old fressers. We told him to add rugelach to the dessert list, and he said it's under consideration.



#55 mtureck

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 04:17 PM

I've been back a few times since my initial tepid review, and now...I'm still going to be swimming upstream here.

Part of it is simply my fault...I grew up on classic, traditional Brooklyn deli, and I came in with too much of a preconceived notion on how things should be. Not fair, really, and my opinions my only be useful to those from the same background. As I said before, once you accept that this isn't a deli, but a high end jewish/deli style restaurant, you'll probably be much happier.

Personally, I need a potato knish.

I need sour pickles.

The pastrami sandwich? Good, but it's far more like a Montreal-style smoked meat sandwich than it is NY deli style.  Not what I was hoping for.

The soup was very good after I fished out the excess dill.

But the prices are still too high...I don't see spending $22 for soup and a sandwich again. They're in dire need of lunch specials. $20 for soup, sandwich, a soda and a scoop of cole slaw would go a long way for me.

Again, I realize that this review isn't particularly fair to the restaurant...and those of you coming in cold will probably enjoy this place more than I do.



#56 jiveturk21

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 09:12 PM

We had a very good dinner here on Tuesday night.  Loved the corned beef, knish and flanken.  The DGS appetizing board, schmutzy fries and kreplach were also quite good.  I could have done without the striped bass (good, but seeminhly out of place) and the latkes were mediocre (although those apple preserves were out of sight).  Cocktails were solid across the board, although I do think that the pours seemed on the   small side.  Wine list had a good mix and was reasonably valued.  The standout dishes, however, were the desserts, especially the babka bread pudding, easily the best dessert that I have had this year.

 

If I had one suggestion, I would find a way to create more bar space.  Not that adding more bar space is easy, but in that area, it is going to be a lot easier to get someone to buy an $11 cocktail than a $13 pastrami sandwich.



#57 zoramargolis

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:09 AM

I've been back a few times since my initial tepid review, and now...I'm still going to be swimming upstream here.

Part of it is simply my fault...I grew up on classic, traditional Brooklyn deli, and I came in with too much of a preconceived notion on how things should be. Not fair, really, and my opinions my only be useful to those from the same background. As I said before, once you accept that this isn't a deli, but a high end jewish/deli style restaurant, you'll probably be much happier.

Personally, I need a potato knish.

I need sour pickles.

The pastrami sandwich? Good, but it's far more like a Montreal-style smoked meat sandwich than it is NY deli style.  Not what I was hoping for.

The soup was very good after I fished out the excess dill.

But the prices are still too high...I don't see spending $22 for soup and a sandwich again. They're in dire need of lunch specials. $20 for soup, sandwich, a soda and a scoop of cole slaw would go a long way for me.

Again, I realize that this review isn't particularly fair to the restaurant...and those of you coming in cold will probably enjoy this place more than I do.

Methinks that mtureck doth kvetch too much. The crew behind DGS knew that they would get a lot of tsuris from farbisseners like this, who simply can't move beyond their over-romanticized rigidity regarding deli food of their past. Personally, I'd sooner eat a chalkboard eraser than a gut-bomb potato knish (my mom made knishes with sour cream dough filled with farmer cheese and pineapple). I love that the DGS chef is doing something creative with his knishes. The chopped liver I had the other night was OUT OF THIS WORLD! The beet borscht and matzo ball soup are both superb! I can't begin to count the lousy bowls of chicken-base (only a mini-step better than bouillon cubes) broth with leaden matzo balls or gluey noodles I have eaten in "traditional" delis in my lifetime. There's a reason so many of them have gone out of business. Long live DGS!


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#58 Twinsdaddy

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 02:20 PM

Had lunch at DGS today with my brother, who lives in NYC and is good friends with the former executive chef at Kutsher's Tribeca, Mark Spangenthal. We agreed that our lunch at DGS was very good. The highlights were the smoked bluefish and chopped liver apps, and our combo pastrami-corned beef sandwich. All very good. The lowlight was the pickle plate, which was definitely a walk on the mild side.

 

As Don suggested upthread (but on my own) I wrapped the last of the chopped liver in the radicchio leaf, and of course it was delicious. But the rye bread was very good too.

 

We had a nice chat with who I think must have been GM Brian Zipin; he obviously could tell we're a couple of old fressers. We told him to add rugelach to the dessert list, and he said it's under consideration.

My second meal at DGS, with Twinsmommy, was as good as the first. The pickle plate was better this time around; the reuben was excellent, the Montreal bagel was very good, the chicken soup was really good (the matzo ball, obviously made by an expert with club soda, was outstanding), and the latkes were smallish but delicious. The only off-note for me on this visit was the noodle kugel, which was not very sweet and overly cinnamony. Fortunately, the ice cream and honeyed apricots provided the needed sweetness, but next time I will try another dessert.



#59 darkstar965

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:47 AM


Made it here tonight for a first visit for dinner. We were four. Like so many, I've been pining for a quality jewish deli for a long time. Since the hype on DGS started early this year, I've been hoping this might fit the bill though have been nervous about the modernization of the concept.

HEADLINE

No, it's not a jewish deli so much as a nicer (more expensive) restaurant serving deli food and drinks. But the food is good, it's not overpriced and they deserve to succeed.
...


BEVERAGE & FOOD

We thought most everything pretty good as follows:
...


Matzo Ball Soup ($7). I didn't think it over-dilled but does have some dill in it. It's a more refined, simple preparation with a medium consistency single matzo ball. Fine. I'd even order it again. But I still think the Matzo Ball Soup at Wagshals is way better than this and best I've yet found in DC.

Chopped Liver ($8). Red Onion Marmalade, Gribenes, Double Baked Rye. All four of us loved this. Great flavor. Ample portion and nice preparation with some red onion. Everyone raved. Maybe the best dish we had.
...

 

The bagels they say they're getting from somewhere in Montreal are disappointingly nothing special.
...

 

I've now been to DGS 4 or so times. Always dinner until today.  When I first posted about DGS, shortly after they opened and quoted above, I think I got it mostly right.  The place isn't a traditional deli. And that's very much okay; smart even; very much welcome and appreciated for what it is. The chopped liver still rocks in the biggest of ways.

 

But, I got the matzo ball soup view wrong and want to now correct my own record. Like hmmboy (maybe?), I prefer a firmer ball but the bowl I had today was great.  Flavor and richness with finely diced veggies.  Absolutely delicious. It's a very different version than what Wagshal's does. I also love that, more rustic, one. But one isn't "way better" than the other in my revised view.  There, I feel better now.

 

I still contend the "montreal bagels" here are all wrong.  Partly due to my admitted bias in favor of NY (or "water") bagels but also because they're previously frozen, shipped a long way and just not with much flavor.

 

Also, since today was my first lunch at DGS, I had to try the corned beef or pastrami sandwich, I considered combining them as one or more people did upthread but decided instead to go with my server's recc on the pastrami.  It was really good.  Totally different kind of sandwich than, say, Msgr. Stachowski's, but it had great flavor, nice fat, peppering and a satisfying warm rye bread.  The generously piled but thin slices were both traditional and delicious.

 

Long live DGS indeed.  ;)



#60 New Foodie

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:05 AM

Finally made it to DGS with a couple girlfriends on Monday night. I think we all came away satisfied, if not overly enthused (and all seemed to enjoy our app and dessert more than our entrees).

 

We started with a Pickle Plate ($5) and Schmutzy Fries (Smoked meat, Swiss cheese, Russian dressing, sauerkraut - $9). As best I could tell, the pickle plate included 3 different types of pickled cucumbers (two in spears and one in chips), 2 different flavors of pickled carrots, and half a pickled egg. There were some I liked more than others, but it was a fun plate with which to start and share. We all really liked the Schmutzy Fries as well (although it is not listed on the menu, the fries seemed to have the zaatar spice on them before being smothered, and there was a spicy relish on top as well). Nice crisp fries, decadent toppings. Another good dish to split.

 

I had the Smoked Amish Chicken (Schmaltzed kale, roasted potatoes, stone mustard - $19), and it was a huge serving. Two giant pieces of chicken, a good-sized serving of kale (which looked like collard greens), and the potatoes which had been tossed in mustard. I ended up taking half of it home and having it last night. I wasn't in love with the chicken (mostly my fault since I don't always enjoy a heavily smoked flavor), but the kale and potatoes were both good. One friend had the Shishlik (marinated and grilled mahi kabob, spicy tomato stew, tzaziki - $18). I think she liked it, but was a bit confused about how it fit onto a Jewish deli menu. This was served over a large portion of Israeli cous cous, and I did like the bite of that I had. My other friend had the Holishkes (ground brisket stuffed cabbage, sweet & sour tomato sauce, rye bread crumb - $18). She liked the flavor, but thought it was a bit rich and needed a vegetable or something else served with it to lighten it and provide some alternative flavor to the beef.

 

For dessert we shared the Babka Bread Pudding (with salted caramel ice cream - $7), and this was really quite good. I think the bread pudding on its own may have been a bit dry, but when eaten with the ice cream, it all went really well together. The big chunks of chocolate in the bread pudding and the creaminess of the ice cream were excellent. I would certainly recommend this dessert to others.

 

As many others before me have said, if you're hankering for a Jewish deli, this not necessarily where you want to go. But for what it is, it seems to be putting out good food.


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#61 DanielK

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:13 AM

...One friend had the Shishlik (marinated and grilled mahi kabob, spicy tomato stew, tzaziki - $18). I think she liked it, but was a bit confused about how it fit onto a Jewish deli menu. ...

 

Shishlik (meat on a stick) is pretty common in Israel. I don't think fish is that common as the protein when served this way, though.



#62 DonRocks

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 07:16 PM

So, if Gribenes are "Jewish Pork Rinds," can Matzo Brei be "Jewish Chilaquiles?"


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#63 Anna Blume

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:19 AM

I understand that this is meant to be more restaurant than deli, but last weekend I was very disappointed when, ravenous, I headed to DGS after market only to discover it closes in between its lunch and dinner shifts.  Since I usually eat lunch/dinner some time between 2 and 3 PM on weekends, I missed my chance and ended up at Taylor's Gourmet, instead. Someday....



#64 Twinsdaddy

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 12:46 PM

So, if Gribenes are "Jewish Pork Rinds," can Matzo Brei be "Jewish Chilaquiles?"

 

Sounds like Tex-Mex Migas might be a bit closer! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Migas


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#65 ad.mich

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:02 PM

Sounds like Tex-Mex Migas might be a bit closer! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Migas

 

I would eat the heck out of some Matzo Brei breakfast tacos.


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#66 Sableberg

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:58 PM

I just got home from a really wonderful experience at DGS.  

 

So my friend and I, both transplanted New York Jews, walked into DGS on the last night of Passover eager for a tasty chametz-free dinner.  But we were greeted by some disappointing news -- their special Passover menu ended on Sunday.  Drat.  After some discussion (kibitzing, perhaps), Brian and his team offered us a riff on the Passover menu with two items from the special menu - Matzo Ball soup (Bone Marrow, Ginger, Scallion and Mustard Oil) and Apple and Rhubarb Crumble (Cardamom Ice Cream) - bookending smaller portions of Passover-friendly regular menu items - Hot smoked salmon (Golden Beet Latke, Pickled Beet Relish, Horseradish Crema) and Romanian steak (Grilled Skirt Steak, Creamy Chickpeas, Sunny Side Egg, Charred Green Onion).  We both paired our meal with an exquisite Dr. Brown's Diet Cream Soda.

 

The hot smoked salmon and the bone marrow matzo ball were my favorites, though all four courses were excellent.  The real highlight was how warm and welcoming the staff were, from the front of the house to the kitchen.  Thanks all for a fabulous meal!  

 

(P.S. DGS and their Passover menu were profiled on NPR last week - http://www.npr.org/b...the-jewish-deli)


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#67 bettyjoan

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 05:06 PM

Sat at the bar at DGS for brunch this morning - really enjoyed my meal.  I definitely understand some of the consternation about this place - I come from a long line of New York Jews, so deli food was a big part of my childhood, and I get that people have very significant culinary memories tied up in this stuff.  However, I really love what they are doing over there, and if you can keep coming back to the tagline on the menu - "Modern Jewish Cookery" - I think it makes a lot more sense.

 

I started with the matzoh ball soup - duh.  That stuff is legit.  The broth was delicious, and the matzoh ball itself was fluffy but still had plenty of structure (it didn't sit like lead in my stomach like oh so many of the bad ones I've had over the years).  Next, I opted for the Benedictberg, which layered latkes, house-smoked salmon, poached eggs, and hollandaise (the menu said sumac hollandaise, but frankly, I wouldn't know sumac if it hit me in the teeth - it had a light, mustard flavor to me).  It was a great way to get a taste of a few of my favorite things, and the dish did not dissapoint.  The smoked salmon was ridiculously good, and the latkes were crispy enough to handle all of the yolk from the eggs.

 

The only sort-of-miss was the dessert - I got the bread pudding, which itself was actually very good (not dry at all).  But it was advertised with salted caramel ice cream, and instead it came with cinnamon ice cream, and I am personally not a huge fan of anything heavily cinnamon flavored.  I took the ice cream off the bread pudding and ate around the places where most of it had seeped in, but they should adjust the menu if they routinely serve it that way.  No biggie, I would have just ordered it sans ice cream had I known in advance.

 

I was at the back bar, and the service was very good.  The inside of the restaurant was pretty slow, since it was the first real day of patio weather for the season.  I like the wine selection (I enjoyed a glass of the riesling, which is shocking - even dry rieslings are usually too sweet for me, but this one was lovely), and the cocktails would definitely call my name if I was there for dinner.  All in all, DGS is a fantastic addition to Dupont Circle, and I am really looking forward to returning and eating more of the menu.  I hope to bring my folks when they visit as well - I think the soup alone would be worth the trip.


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#68 Tweaked

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 10:18 AM

Happy Hour. DGS. 5-7 Daily. At the bar. Excellent.

 

The smoked salmon tartar with everything aioli and bagel crunchies gets my early vote for dish of the year (so far edition).  Perfect balance of smoke, salt, fat, crunch.  Luscious...and only $5.

 

Also great was the grilled tongue rueben slider.  More of a small sandwich served on their rye bread than a burger-style slider.  The tongue was excellent, super tender but still meaty.  oh, it's only $4.  Four dollars people.  Perhaps the best four dollar dish in DC. 

 

Fiery Brisket Balls...not very fiery at all , but if you like deep fried meat balls these are your thing...It's hard not to order them at 3 for $5, but I was perhaps expecting more out of them.  Good but not reaching the heights of the salmon and tongue. 

 

We also ordered a couple items off the main dinner menu.

 

Kreplach - A lovely plate of salt cod ravioli, very mildly fishy, certainly not overpowering.  Was desperate for some sort of acid bite, perhaps a scattering of capers or preserved lemon would elevate this dish from good to excellent.

 

Potato Latkes - These were fine.  For $7 you get two rather small latkes and not really worth the price compared to what we were getting at similar prices off the Happy Hour menu.  Loved the home made apple preserve. 

 

French Fries - a healthy portion of fries for $5 with a nice yogurt sauce for dipping.  They could have been a bit more crispy, some fries were rather limp.

 

Babka Bread Pudding with Salted Caramel Ice cream - A dessert worthy of a "put a fork in me" moment.  Not heavy or dense like bread pudding can be, but rich and buttery with a good ice cream melting in the middle of the plate.

 

U-Bet Egg Cream - Maybe because I wasn't born in America I'm missing the nostalgia gene for this.  A $3 experiment into Americana...I went there, but I don't see the need in going back.      

 

Note on the pickles...I have to agree with the posters above, the pickles are weak.

 

Our first time at DGS and we were suitably impressed.  Off to a good start and can only hope it will get better.

 

All of the above plus two glasses of wine and a cocktail came in at $69, not including tip.    


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#69 zoramargolis

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 12:11 PM

The egg cream made with Fox's U-Bet chocolate syrup is a completely NYC thing, not an American one. I grew up in Los Angeles, going to delis in the Fairfax Ave. neighborhood where I grew up, also called "kosher canyon." I never heard of an egg cream until I visited relatives in Brooklyn as a teenager, and I was underwhelmed by them--the egg creams as well as the relatives. J. grew up in Long Island, and even though he is not a member of the tribe by birth, visits to Manhattan were a big treat for him and he has much greater nostalgia than I do for the corner lunch counter egg creams he had as a kid.



#70 Michael Landrum

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 02:18 PM

...but frankly, I wouldn't know sumac if it hit me in the teeth...

 

In Hebrew, the word "sumac" homophonically forms the base of such an unspeakably filthy curse word that you will almost never hear the word spoken itself. That said, it is quite commonly, and quite deliciously, used to season eggs.

 

The vibrant purple color, together with its visual similarities to henna'ed hair (which is often brought to great creative use in the curse), doesn't help matters much.

 

Just don't ask for it by name. The same is true for t'hina, which isn't helped by its literal derivation from the word "to grind".



#71 Michael Landrum

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 02:27 PM

 

Sorry, couldn't help myself. All is not as it seems. Besides, it just wouldn't be right if I didn't post a seemingly irrelevant, to those who don't know the inner workings of depravity, youtube link.



#72 hmmboy

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 11:45 PM

Earlier this week I stopped by DGS for lunch. I have been dreaming about their sublime chopped liver since devouring about 3/4 lb when I visited earlier in the year. The liver was as good as I remembered, and the pastrami was also very good, but the chicken matzoh ball soup was the star this day - the best I have ever had in a restaurant, and frankly on par with the best versions turned out by my mom, my bubbies, and assorted aunts. Really great stuff. 


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#73 ol_ironstomach

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 11:00 PM

I didn't grow up eating this cuisine, so take it from an outsider: that chopped liver is fantastic.  Best I've ever had, and I'd go back just to have it again.  Heck, I'd even eat the lettuce garnish it's scooped onto, just to save the dregs.


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#74 jiveturk21

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 01:35 PM

Whitefish salad and fries for lunch.  I know nothing about whitefish salad, but this tasted great, the bagel was fantastic and there was good balance with the other items on the dish (capers, lettuce, radishes, etc.).  I also really liked the fries, better than what I have had here before.  The one downside is that our server(s) were rushing us even after we kind of asked them not to.  It was lunch, but they were not jammed, not sure why they were being so annoying.



#75 Twinsdaddy

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 03:47 PM

I didn't grow up eating this cuisine, so take it from an outsider: that chopped liver is fantastic.  Best I've ever had, and I'd go back just to have it again.  Heck, I'd even eat the lettuce garnish it's scooped onto, just to save the dregs.

Take it from someone who did grow up eating Jewish food, and regularly helped his great-aunt make her legendary chopped liver: DGS's is fantastic. Aunt Pearl would approve. And she'd have a beer with her meal, too.



#76 lion

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 07:46 PM

We took my wife's mother there on a recent visit and it was throughly enjoyable.  I second people's comments about the quality and taste of the good food.  Also loved the U-bet chocolate egg cream drink.  Not sure if this is a popular style drink item these days, but really like the mixed textures in the drink.  My only negative with the place was the sound level upstairs was quite high. 



#77 KeithA

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 02:29 PM

  My only negative with the place was the sound level upstairs was quite high. 

 

Went last night for a late-ish dinner with a friend looking to catch up.  Immediately upon being sitted upstairs, we realized we'd have to yell across our small two-top to hear each other, so we had them move us back downstairs to one of the much quieter tables across from the kitchen.  Service was great and food was really good. We shared the pastrami sandwich which is now a full 1/2 lb of meat making it a good value for $13 (I believe this is significantly larger than when they first opened around my last and only other visit). Meat was very flavorful and while a bit thick cut, moist and tender.  Maybe not as good a value for size as Stachkowski - it was much better flavor IMHO (although I lean toward the American Jewish cooking more than the traditional European flavor that Stachkowski goes for).  The pickle plate was much better than last time too - the pickled ramps were outstanding!  The fries with zaatar were also very good - so good they didn't need any dip but the yogurt sauce wasn't bad either. The latkes were fine, nothing too exciting and while I appreciate that the applesauce was homemade, it was too cloyingly sweet.  The Schmoozer cocktail described as their version of a mojito was very good. Can't wait to go back and venture into the menu more and I'll definitely be back to get a good sandwich to go.


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#78 bettyjoan

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 09:35 AM

Brought my parents to brunch yesterday - my mom and dad inhaled the chopped liver, and mom emphatically proclaimed that it reminded her of her grandmother's version (which is the highest of high praise).  She also had nothing but compliments for the matzo ball soup.  I, of course, continue to order and thoroughly enjoy the Benedictberg - it is just too good for me to even think about ordering anything else.  The challah french toast was a good choice for dessert - it is a HUGE portion, but split between 4 people it was just the right amount of sweetness to end the meal.  One of these days, I need to get to dinner at DGS, but I enjoy brunch so much it is hard to deviate!


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#79 KeithA

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 12:45 PM

 

We shared the pastrami sandwich which is now a full 1/2 lb of meat making it a good value for $13 (I believe this is significantly larger than when they first opened around my last and only other visit). Meat was very flavorful and while a bit thick cut, moist and tender.  Maybe not as good a value for size as Stachkowski - it was much better flavor IMHO (although I lean toward the American Jewish cooking more than the traditional European flavor that Stachkowski goes for).  Can't wait to go back and venture into the menu more and I'll definitely be back to get a good sandwich to go.

True to my word, had the Pastrami to go today with some dill pickles - excellent. Meat is just spectacular - a bit spicy, moist, just the right amount of falling apart and good mix of fat and lean meat on the sandwich. The pickles are very crisp yet well flavored from the dill and lots of garlic. Definitely worth the trek   :D



#80 chefgunshow

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 01:52 PM

What I love about this place is the fact that they don't overstuff the sandwiches. It's a quality product and shouldn't be served in Jurassic portion sizes. I've had the rueben twice, both awesome.


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#81 JoshNE

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 09:20 PM

We went for dinner tonight.  Service was odd...very fast-paced.  Almost as though it was the lunch rush and they were trying to get folks in and out on their lunch break, except that it was 7pm, and the place wasn't full.  Our entrees came about 2 minutes after the starters were dropped off, without any recognition that that would be an odd way to serve someone dinner.  Anywho...

 

The food was excellent.  We started with the chopped liver and latkes.  Both excellent, and it turns out our little dude L.O.V.E.S. liver.  He has good genes.

 

The pastrami sandwich was great. I agree with Brad...there was just the right proportion of thickly-cut pastrami for the sandwich.

 

We also had the stuffed cabbage.  The ground brisket stuffing was well-seasoned and nicely textured - not the dense gutbomb of overworked meat I got used to taking down at 4am at certain 24-hour Eastern European joints in NYC.  The tomato-sauce was bright, and had a nice spiciness to it that is often lacking in the Eastern European food I've had.

 

We'll be back for more liver, and to give the pierogi a try. 


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#82 jrichstar

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 09:27 AM

Went last night and really enjoyed it.  Everything was excellent and a few things spectacular.  Solid corned beef, matzo ball soup (could use a bit more salt for my taste but matzo ball was awesome) and latkes (of the thick variety).  I don't think I've had a better pastrami sandwich, including at the beloved Attman's in Baltimore.  Perfect texture, fatty but not too fatty, and the smoke flavor was just right. The babka bread pudding was a huge hit, and with the salty caramel gelato, was a perfect combination of sweet, salty, creamy, hot and cold.

 

Highly recommended spot. 



#83 KeithA

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 01:53 PM

I've sang DGS's praises in my earlier posts, but needed to chime in again to comment on their great happy hour deals. Last week, my wife and I stopped by for an early dinner and we're delighted with our HH cocktails (the shiksa and the meyer lansky sour). They also about 5 HH food options that are a bit more playful than their typical menu - all for $5 which is a great value because the portions are pretty big.  Instead of the good looking mess of pastrami chili cheese fries, I opted for the Art of Kung Fu Jew - which are 2 good sized pastrami reuben egg rolls with a side of russian dressing. You could easily eat these with a cocktail as a small/medium-sized meal and walk out for under $15. The egg rolls for tasty with a good amount of pastrami and kraut, cheese was harder taste (but that was fine with me).  I also snagged a bite of my wife's stuffed cabbage from the regular menu which was excellent with a bit of spice (she wished it had a bit more cabbage) - also a good value at $9 for a half order (one big cabbage with a bit of orzo).  And finally because I couldn't resist it, I had the pastrami sandwich - Excellent as ever. It is so good that when I took half home and reheated it the next day, it was still really good. 

 

Now I need to go back and continue to branch out to more non-pastrami items on the menu. I think next time I go, I'll get some other things and get the pastrami to go for leftovers.

 

Lastly, I think DGS's valentine's all-you-can-eat special is amusing.  I guess George (and I) aren't the only ones who find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted cured meats:

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=xj9ZsJz1uQU



#84 mdt

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 11:00 AM

Had dinner here the other night and the beets and pirogi were excellent as starters. The pastrami was rather dry and lean which made me wish I ordered something else (maybe an off night?). The other folks enjoyed their selections.



#85 daveo

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 09:23 AM

Finally made it for Brunch,which I view as a perfect time and meal for this restaurant.   The place was packed.  No reservations for brunch, but they'll call or text you when a table was ready.   

 

I had to laugh.  I arranged to meet a very old friend at 1:00.  I got there early and he was already there at the bar.  When I walked into the bar we were by far the two oldest folks.   Ironic;  we are friends from college and now its decades later.   The fine folks at the front came back to get us when a table had cleared in the time period they had told me...but we ate at the bar.  

 

I've been working through the rye drinks and ordered one of them.  We both struggled through the brunch menu and unfortunately didn't discuss it...and ended up ordering the same thing, the eggs benedictberg.   hah.   

 

I like a lighter latkes.   These two came and looked like healthy crabcakes to the eye.  The smoked salmon was very very good.  The cocktail and then coffee both excellent.  Service was great by the bartender, who referenced he was one of only 3 people still there from the opening.  

 

I've had sandwiches, now brunch....still need to work my way through this menu.   Its a terrific place.



#86 goodeats

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 10:47 PM

They have a really, really good salted caramel ice cream on the dessert menu. As in "just the right kind of richness without it being super sweet" kind of good. Just saying....

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