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Zora's Butt-Kickin BBQ Sauce


DonRocks
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We are honored to be in the presence of her greatness. Now may we please taste some....?

Umm--I'm hoping the former remark is ironic. Unless you were referring to my large-ness. And friends, as far as the latter goes, this is a really simple recipe (as opposed to the third-place winner, whose sauce involves wood-smoking vegetables for hours). If you have the ingredients on hand--and the only slightly obscure ones are ancho chile powder and Sriracha--it'll take you about 15 minutes to make it from start to finish.

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Umm--I'm hoping the former remark is ironic. Unless you were referring to my large-ness. And friends, as far as the latter goes, this is a really simple recipe (as opposed to the third-place winner, whose sauce involves wood-smoking vegetables for hours). If you have the ingredients on hand--and the only slightly obscure ones are ancho chile powder and Sriracha--it'll take you about 15 minutes to make it from start to finish.

Sounds fabulous and a piece of cake to make. The only thing I'll have to buy to make this is the "ball park" mustard. Haven't bought any of that in years.

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The only thing I'll have to buy to make this is the "ball park" mustard.

Don't buy it, or stadium mustard, in Cleveland or you'll end up with the wrong kind!

And thank you Zora for creating a winning simple recipe that nearly anyone can make, looking forward to trying it.

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Thanks everybody for all of the good wishes! My impulsive decision to enter this bbq sauce contest and the subsequent win have been a big ego boost and a bit of a reminder that the passion I have for food and cooking resides in my heart and brain, even when the rest of my body isn't able to go along for the ride. When Bonnie Benwick from the Post called me to tell me that I had been chosen as a finalist, I had completely forgotten about entering the contest.

I truly regret not being able to come to the picnic to see old friends and meet new ones, but hope that by the time of next picnic I'll be back on both feet and cooking on all cylinders again.

Warm regards to all!

-zora

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I can not wait to try this recipe! I was going to make it tonight but don't have any yellow mustard. When I make it, I'm making it right. I'm going to serve it with either pork or chicken. Am also intrigued by the smoking and Zora has become our very own grill master.

Kudos!

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Thanks, Jael! I loved your book! I was completely engrossed in reading it while I was in the hospital, after recent surgery--it took my mind off my misery, and for that I am truly grateful!

Re: Jael's book: Pay attention to an upcoming announcement on this website!

I went to the White House farmers' market today to pick up some chicken thighs from Garden Path Farms to grill this weekend with your sauce. Nena is invited to partake and, hopefully, pictures will be forthcoming.

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I made Zora's sauce yesterday and slathered it on grilled chicken, with extra for the table. Six of seven people went ga-ga over it! The one abstainer can't do any spice at all, so I assumed she wouldn't be interested. I'm having more today with Popeye's chicken tenders, and the lunch is planned around the sauce! I look forward to doing it again and using pure ancho powder. All I had in the house was Penzey's and Bloemer's, so I used a tbsp. of each. Good, good stuff, Zora. Thanks!

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I made Zora's sauce yesterday and slathered it on grilled chicken, with extra for the table. Six of seven people went ga-ga over it! The one abstainer can't do any spice at all, so I assumed she wouldn't be interested. I'm having more today with Popeye's chicken tenders, and the lunch is planned around the sauce! I look forward to doing it again and using pure ancho powder. All I had in the house was Penzey's and Bloemer's, so I used a tbsp. of each. Good, good stuff, Zora. Thanks!

Excellent news! So glad you tried it and it made you and your dinner guests happy! When I was informed that I was a finalist, two of the folks at the Washington Post who judged the contest told me in private phone conversations that they REALLY liked it. I only found out that I had actually won the contest about an hour before the story went up online.

Now watch some commercial company'll take the recipe and make a million bucks bottling it as an "award-winning sauce." B)

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I followed the recipe pretty much exactly, except I used Rancho Gordo New Mexican Chili Powder, instead of Ancho. When I first made and tasted the sauce, I thought it was probably too hot for people other than myself and didn't add any Sriracha. Interestingly, after sitting in the fridge for a day or so, the heat dissapated quite a bit. It was very tasty slathered on some grilled chicken thighs and there is plenty left over to use again B) . But, I will be sure to add some hot sauce to it before using it again. Such an easy sauce to make, it's almost a shame. Thanks, Zora!

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I followed the recipe pretty much exactly, except I used Rancho Gordo New Mexican Chili Powder, instead of Ancho. When I first made and tasted the sauce, I thought it was probably too hot for people other than myself and didn't add any Sriracha. Interestingly, after sitting in the fridge for a day or so, the heat dissapated quite a bit. It was very tasty slathered on some grilled chicken thighs and there is plenty left over to use again B) . But, I will be sure to add some hot sauce to it before using it again. Such an easy sauce to make, it's almost a shame. Thanks, Zora!

I made it last night, doubling the recipe, and had the same experience: too spicy at first. But then when I cooked with it, it mellowed and turned out perfect. I used this on baby back ribs last night and, if you were to play a recording of the sounds my family made as we tore through those two racks of ribs, I don't think it would be work safe. Well done, Zora!

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I made it last night, doubling the recipe, and had the same experience: too spicy at first. But then when I cooked with it, it mellowed and turned out perfect. I used this on baby back ribs last night and, if you were to play a recording of the sounds my family made as we tore through those two racks of ribs, I don't think it would be work safe. Well done, Zora!

I used part of a leftover chicken breast in a Cobb salad and the chicken has a nice spiciness to it from the sauce that penetrated the meat. Nothing overpowering at all, but a good flavor.

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I used this on baby back ribs last night and, if you were to play a recording of the sounds my family made as we tore through those two racks of ribs, I don't think it would be work safe. Well done, Zora!

Ditto. What a fantastic sauce! Congratulations on winning the contest, although I find it a little odd that the winner of a BBQ sauce recipe contest wins (among other things) a collection of bottled BBQ sauces. B)

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I made it last night, doubling the recipe, and had the same experience: too spicy at first. But then when I cooked with it, it mellowed and turned out perfect.

That's why I made the amount of Sriracha unspecific--it's fiery stuff. And for the WaPo contest, please note that I called it "Spicy South Carolina Mustard Sauce."

Ditto. What a fantastic sauce! Congratulations on winning the contest, although I find it a little odd that the winner of a BBQ sauce recipe contest wins (among other things) a collection of bottled BBQ sauces. B)

Not only that, but a book of bbq sauce recipes! I have not received them yet, but I will look it all over and decide whether I have the pantry space to spare, in anticipation of lazy days when I don't feel like making my own sauce. Or maybe I'll give them away. One of them is supposed to be Rockland's sauce, which I actually like a lot. So I'll probably hang onto that one. What I am looking forward to is the bbq crawl with Jim Shahin, the Post's bbq columnist. He's taking me and the 2nd place winner backstage at three bbq restaurants, to see "how they do it"--Rockland's, Hill Country, and a third one I can't recall. As far as the Safeway-sponsored bbq competition, where I am to be an honorary judge: well, i hope they have an air-conditioned space somewhere, for me to hang out in. Spending a July day outside in downtown DC is not an ideal activity for someone whose personal comfort zone ranges up to a maximum of 78 degrees or so, with low humidity. Kind of like today.

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Now watch some commercial company'll take the recipe and make a million bucks bottling it as an "award-winning sauce." B)

You'll never know for sure because they'll say the recipe is "secret." :D

BTW, I haven't chimed in on this thread before but congrats to my fellow WashPo culinary contest winner. I think we are in a fairly small frat-sor-ety. Alas my recipe for half-smokes served over white beans never did become Washington's "signature dish," but I have high hopes for the future of Butt-Kickin BBQ Sauce!

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As far as the Safeway-sponsored bbq competition, where I am to be an honorary judge: well, i hope they have an air-conditioned space somewhere, for me to hang out in. Spending a July day outside in downtown DC is not an ideal activity for someone whose personal comfort zone ranges up to a maximum of 78 degrees or so, with low humidity. Kind of like today.

Word. Dame Edna likes to tell people that I like the temp at home to be 55 degrees and he likes it at 85--so we compromise at 55. Is it my fault the boy doesn't know from menopause? B)

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According to today's Washington Post food section, mine was the most downloaded recipe during the month of May. It brings to mind a WWI era dance craze as depicted in the Fred Astaire film "The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle" : 'Too Much Mustard' - B)

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According to today's Washington Post food section, mine was the most downloaded recipe during the month of May. It brings to mind a WWI era dance craze as depicted in the Fred Astaire film "The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle" : 'Too Much Mustard' - B)

Wow, congratulations! I bought yellow mustard yesterday with your recipe in mind.

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