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Clyde's, a Georgetown-Based Chain - Giant American Restaurants in Numerous Area Locations


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A Clyde’s regular gets a final honor from those who knew her best, by John Kelly, October 31, 2018, on washingtonpost.com.

At this point I'm happy to go to Tower Oaks for my m-i-l's sake, but I'd be happy to never eat there again, too.  Case in point, read the first line under "Brunch Starters":

To our server last night at the Gallery Place Clyde's: Don't tell me that I'm a fool for ordering a Jim Beam and Coke because you think that your ridiculous house cocktails (with ingredients like Pi

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I am a fan of Clyde's. While I probably wouldn't eat there on my own accord, it fufills a need most places can't. When family or guests are in town and you need to please the picky kid, vegetarian and grandparent who only eats meat, Clyde fits the bill. Their wings at the old Friendship Heights location weren't too bad either.

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I am a fan of Clyde's.  While I probably wouldn't eat there on my own accord, it fufills a need most places can't.  When family or guests are in town and you need to please the picky kid, vegetarian and grandparent who only eats meat, Clyde fits the bill.  Their wings at the old Friendship Heights location weren't too bad either.

I agree 100%. They also had good desserts.

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While I have fond memories of the omelette room at the Clydes in Georgetown and the original Old Ebbitts Grill, I have to ditto the previous comments. Having just suffered airline "food" and an IHOP which managed to screw up scrambled eggs and hash browns, Clydes doesn't look so bad. It certainly IS kid-friendly as Peanut's parents will surely learn, without being egregiously horrible.

There is a place for such a "chain", but probably not for most of us.

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It certainly IS kid-friendly as Peanut's parents will surely learn, without being egregiously horrible.

There is a place for such a "chain", but probably not for most of us.

Nope. Experienced Clyde's enough to avoid it going forward. :lol:

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Recently posted in another forum... ;)

I had dinner at the Clyde's at Tower Oaks Lodge (not my choice, I had voted for Black Market :lol: ) last night with a bunch of moms from Emma's school. The calamari was competent, my salad was a little underdressed but good, my main dish... might have been the worst meal I've had so far this year, and that includes frozen pizza.

Seared Scallops with pancetta & asparagus, over mashed potatoes sounded OK but the execution left much to be desired. Diced asparagus mixed with too much salty bacon was tossed with what was obviously frozen peas 'n' carrots and dumped, with its liquid around indifferent mashed potatoes. It was topped with a generous serving of utterly tasteless scallops, with almost no color despite being "seared". Bleah.

Dessert was some Hawaiian thing served in half a pineapple It was good - pineapple, mango and strawberries over coconut ice cream and pound cake - but was obviously meant to serve 3 people. I wound up eating the fruit and leaving the rest.

I talked the ladies out of a California chard and we drank a Yalumba Viognier instead - and it was the best part of the meal.

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Clyde's at Tower Oaks Lodge in Rockville is hosting a local farming five-course farm dinner with Slow Food D.C. on August 1, at 6:30pm. Details here at Farmgroupie (scroll down to second item). RSVP by July 28.

For $50 for non-Slow Food members, which it says includes wine, tax and tip here is the posted menu:

Scallops with Wild Mushroom Salad

Heirloom Tomato Tart with Fontina and Tapenade viniagrette

Jumbo lump crab cake with corn and tomatoes Chesapeake

Grilled Summerfield Farms Waygu Beef with Caponata

A selection of American Artisanal Cheeses with Summer Fruits

Pennsylvania Peach Cobbler with Cornmeal Crumble and Blackberry Ice Cream

Speakers:

Clyde's VP Tom Meyer will speak about the success of Clyde's farm-fresh initiative.

Heidi Hanson and Chris Warner of Warner Hanson Television in Washington will speak about their new series of Chefs A Field, which takes the nation's best chefs out to the field to look at where their food comes from.

Guest farmer from area farm.

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We're headed to Clyde's for lunch next week because the only choices given to us were here, the Daily Grill, and the Palm -- I refuse to go back to the Palm due to horrible experiences on two separate occasions.

Anyone been recently who can recommend some reasonably decent menu options?

(yes, on paper the Palm is probably the superior option but this is a boycott I won't reconsider)

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Nope. Experienced Clyde's enough to avoid it going forward. :P

While I don't wish to throw a bucket of ice water on your head, you may well find yourself choosing between Clydes and Chuck-E-Cheese to make that little darling happy. I mean, she can't even talk yet. . . as perfectly adorable as she is. I speak not as a Mother but as an Auntie just interested in making a kid happy.

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Written on Mrs. B's Computer but written by the Mr., aka waitman.

In 1976 I got my first job ever. Dishwashing in a joint called Per Bacco! in Columbia, Maryland (where I lived) on the shores of beautiful Lake Kittamaqundi (or however the fuck you spell it). About my eitgth week into the job I showed up for work and they were hauling furniture and food out the front door. Another casuaulty of the restaurant trade. A few months later, the first Clyde's clone moved in, and I'd bring dates there for omelettes (a high school buddy of mine became an omelette chef) and Blue Nun wine. I learned to make an omelette Bonne Femme from eating there. When I went to college, the (now deceased) Omelette Room in Georgetown became a regular spot on the attempted (always attempted, never consumated) seduction route. The song "Afternoon Delight" was inspired by the menu title there; the food was better than the song. Patrick Buchanan was once arrested for starting a brawl in Clyde's; the late owner was responsible for getting legislation passed that allowed patrons in DC to drink standing up, rather than seated only. And, they saved the Old Ebbitt.

And, if you're in G'town and need a martini for dad and burger for the kids, it's one of the few places that can be counted on to produce both in a competent fashion.

Yeah, it's a chain, but they've have earned a little leeway over the years.

Edited by Mrs. B
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Oh, come on. There are many worse places than Clyde's. I have family in Reston, and the branch there is good for a casual lunch outside or a comfortable dinner seated in their soft leather booths. I've never had bad service there, the crab cake ain't bad- and the same goes for the buffalo burger and the steak salad, IMO.

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You definately can not beat half price wine on sunday (at least in the Georgetown location). I think their brunch is okay...nothing to rave about, but does the job.

Yeah, the crab cake special this month is a pretty good deal.  I had it at the Chevy Chase location and found the cakes to be quite good.  And the accompanying corn and tomato saute is very fresh and sweet.

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The crab cake it is, then. Thanks for the tips.

Your Palm boycott sounds an awful lot like my Clyde's boycott.

Heh. The thing about Clyde's is that half the time my meals there are pretty good and half the time my meals there are pretty bad. Whereas at the Daily Grill, it's consistently mediocre. I'd rather flip a coin with Clyde's, on the chance that I catch them on a good day.

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Great, just what we need another Clyde's.

Now it's open, and I can't imagine another restaurant that could have done a better job there. It's absolutely gargantuan, seating (according to the fact sheet) 537 PLUS three bars. Every imaginable surface is covered in cherry wood, including most of the ceilings. Expensive tilework, paintings, and bronze sculptures (sports and horse themed) round out the space. I'd be willing to bet it cost more than Rosa Mexicano, IndeBleu, and Zengo combined. It's an unbelievable experience for under $20 an entree.

Fairly typical Clyde's menu, about ten beers on tap (usual suspects, nothing that wouldn't appeal to a Caps fan after a game). They've got an oyster bar with about 8 varieties on and are running the same early and late weekday raw bar happy hour as Old Ebbitt Grill. I had a few very fresh and unassertive but excellent Raspberry Point Malpeques. I had a reuben with the best corned beef I've had in recent memory and slightly under-toasted bread. Even after midnight the kitchen was slammed and the food took a while to arrive.

Even if you hate what 7th Street has become, even if you hate Clyde's, at least go and take a walk through the place to see a no holds (or dollars) barred restaurant from local owners trumping anything a national chain has put in the area.

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I have been waiting for a reason to post about this.

Twice now, I have gone to the Clyde's Tower Oaks location for a weekend lunch/brunch. While far from perfect, it is still a delightful way to spend and hour or two.

Go during the day. Sit in a both in the back room with all the windows that backs to the grove of trees. I think they call it the "Great Room." It is, in every way, beautiful. And I would have to say, I am as snotty and as skeptical as they come about chains. They spent a lot of money on this place, and it shows.

The waiter will be a half-competent kid. Order a beer or a bottle of Australian Sav Blanc. It will take him 10-12 minutes to return. Get used to it.

They have an Oyster menu with about 8 varieties, both east coast and west coast. They also have little neck clams. Order a dozen of something on the half shell. Perfectly fresh, perfectly shucked (with plenty of liquor), and expertly clean.

Follow that with a bowl of the cream of crab soup. It's not as tasty as it should be, but it has plenty of crab (real?). Order a shot a sherry to spruce it up, and a good grinding of black pepper. Or the Watercress and Pear salad, but ask for the dressing on the side. Usually I frown on requests like this, but at Clyde's they make it a practice of drowning the salads in dressing.

Another bottle of wine. A cup of black coffee. And a very reasonable bill.

What's not to like?

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Just got back from lunch at the new Clyde's...wow, this place is HUGE! The interior is indeed very nicely done- plush booths, stained glass everywhere. My coworker remarked that the decor reminded her of "Titanic", grand staircase included. There was a wait to be seated at the hostess stand, our waitress was still a bit green, but she did a great job. The menu is the same as at the other Clyde's for the most part- burgers, sandwiches, pastas, etc. My crabcake sandwich was excellent (esp. compared to the cruddy one I had at Chef Geoff's last week), the calamari tender and crispy. Great experience, can't wait to sidle up to that nice long bar (or three!) for an after-work cocktail.

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I like the side entrance on the second floor landing (inside) for using the (2nd floor) facilities instead of at the movie theater, entrance is opposite the new Lucky Strike. You also pass TONS of Local Art (fishmarket, macpeharson square, etc), their private room (with a Life-sized bronze horse at full gallop WITH a jockey on top) on the way to the UPSTAIRS bar.

They seem to have taken the multiple-bar theme from old ebbit and merged it with the massive booth concept of clydes. I do feel a little sorry for them tho. My rough restaurnat math tells me that they need to turn about 800-1000 covers just to break even (hi rent, hi staffing, ALL that WOOD and TILE and WOOD). I think I asked, they have 17 server and bartenter POS's :lol: (Point of Sales - ordering terminals), and I hear the have a paperless kitchen, all computer screens, jeez.

Indeed true on the oyster happy hour, including the late nite one :) I seem to recall they have huge american whiskey selection (think KENTUCKY derby). They've also, in a clearly savvy attempt to rule the world, copied the Ebbit express, but it in the entrance alcove the the movie theater, around the corner from the main entrance, and made it full time for sndwiches and soups to go.

Is bigger going to rule the world? i don't know, but since 7th street on that block (with the exception of Zengo) is mostly Mc D, fudruckers, etc, I predict we'll all stop in there :P a) just to check it out :( when we go to a movie and can't even consider $6 popcorn and 3) (yes 3) after an MCI event, when traffic stinks and (a-b-3-oohyes) 3.1 mod) when showing friends around DC

well, that's my 2 bits...

D

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That's a shame. Where might you recommend for good oysters in the MD suburbs?

It might be a heresy, but this food and booze snob was very pleased with the Oyster Menu and a cold bottle of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc in the gorgeous (in a Hollywood way) Great Room of the Clyde's at Tower Oaks one recent Saturday afternoon. Several varieties to choose from, served perfectly fresh, cleanly shucked, well iced, with lemon wedges, a hearty cocktail sauce (with additional horseradish on the side), a respectable mignonette (sp? right word?) , and proper oyster crackers.

Caution: This rave does not apply to the service, any other food items, or evening dining.

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It might be a heresy, but this food and booze snob was very pleased with the Oyster Menu and a cold bottle of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc in the gorgeous (in a Hollywood way) Great Room of the Clyde's at Tower Oaks one recent Saturday afternoon.  Several varieties to choose from, served perfectly fresh, cleanly shucked, well iced, with lemon wedges, a hearty cocktail sauce (with additional horseradish on the side), a respectable mignonette (sp?  right word?) , and proper oyster crackers.

I find the same to be true of the Clyde's at Mark Center. There is nothing comparable in the area, and we always seem to end up there. They offer 1/2 price raw bar after 10 (not 100% sure on the time) till close on the weekdays, and they have a Gruner by the glass (One of my favorites). It is a wicked deal.

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Yeah, the crab cake special this month is a pretty good deal.  I had it at the Chevy Chase location and found the cakes to be quite good.  And the accompanying corn and tomato saute is very fresh and sweet.

Due to last minute planning and a desire to head down to the Chinatown area, the new Clyde's was the only option with a reservation available at the desired time. As others have said, for me, Clyde's serves more as a place to take the out-of-towners than a regular choice. I was curious about the new location and now I know.... I think I'll stick to my local branch at Mark Center. The sheer size of the place is quite impressive, as are all the details of design and decoration. However, the volume (550 seated at one time) takes a toll on the very consistent service I've come to expect from a Clyde's (any Clyde's). To be fair, I think the service problems we experienced were largely due to a young and inexperienced server who was overwhelmed, but that's when I expect the managers to step in and that really didn't happen, other than trying to smooth ruffled feathers.

Long story short, a bottle of wine and a beer were ordered as the entrees were dropped. Nearly 20 minutes passed before the waitress returned with the beer, wine glasses, and the news that they were out of that particular bottle, did we want to try X, which was very nice. Well... NO, we wanted the wine with dinner and we were about done with dinner (I think everyone but me had cleaned their plate completely)....the manager eventually came over and took some blame because she had been trying to locate the bottle in the back, as the bar was out of it. Free desserts were offered, but that wasn't really the point - a little information a lot more quickly would have made a big difference. There was also a bit longer delay between courses than you might normally expect; again, probably a function of the size of the place.

Now for the food:

The crab cake special mentioned above is back on for February (2 crab cakes for $16.95 with accompaniments) - of course that corn and tomato saute is nowhere to be seen. Instead there was sauteed spinach and "Tom's Potatoes". 2 of our party ordered and enjoyed the crab cakes. A dozen oysters were ordered from the selection of 7 varieties and were at the high level of quality you'd expect from Clyde's/Old Ebbitt oysters.

For a starter, I enjoyed the tuna martini - very nice raw tuna, in a light citrusy sauce with some avocado chunks, and topped with thin strips of what I think was apple or pear. They must have been out of martini glasses as the dish showed up in a soup cup :lol:

For my main, I ordered the duck breast which came with a wild rice pilaf and a nice, tart fruit sauce that included cranberries and orange segments, along with some caramelized onions. It was a nice combination with the duck, although perhaps there was a bit too much orange juice in the sauce. The fourth ordered the bacon crusted salmon and was met with some resistance when asking for it to be cooked medium rare (again, this was probably lack of experience/knowledge on the server's part). I didn't hear any strong opions so I assume it was acceptable - though it did look a little overcooked from where I was sitting.

I think it is a great place to stop in on an afternoon while sightseeing or before a game/concert, but won't be on my list of regular places. There are at least 3 bars (maybe more) and a huge private party room and the space is worth seeing, at least for a drink - or maybe for their weekday late-night oyster happy hour!

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Washington, DC  (February 12, 2006)- For Washingtonians, Clyde's "On the Walk," located in the Gallery Place promenade at 707 7th Street, NW, offers from scratch, made-to-order fare as a fast alternative for "to-go" meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner.  Open Monday thru Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. delicious, quick standouts include Clyde's famous jumbo lump crab cake sandwich on a potato roll priced at only $7.50; roast pork loin with rapini greens and provolone cheese on a sub roll for $5.95, bratwurst on a potato hot dog bun for $3.00, as well as the daily sandwich special of roasted turkey breast, cornbread stuffing and cranberry sauce on rye bread priced at $5.95.  Additionally, an assortment of desserts and snacks including freshly baked brownies, cookies and chips are always available in the intimate 18 seat eatery.

How do you make a bratwurst on a potato hot dog bun "from scratch?"

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I took my visiting parents to brunch at Clyde's yesterday. We were going to the Wizards/Sixers game at 1 pm, and with the snow, I was looking for a place that's close. Cafe Atlantico was absolutely not an option for my straight-laced parents so Clyde's it was.

It's chain-y-ness makes me cringe. The decor, the menu, the service, the space, all of it just made me want to apologize in advance even though my parents thought it was perfect (they said so multiple times). Even with the strangest service I've witnessed in ages and food that was just OK, they liked it. I guess my parents are Clyde's target market.

We were sent upstairs for a seat in non-smoking, but when we arrived, facing a large empty section of tables, we were told that there would be a wait for a table. Perhaps some staff didn't show due to the snow...? Dunno. Fortunately the wait was brief. We were seated in a booth overlooking 7th Street and shortly thereafter, greeted by a pleasant young male server.

The poor guy didn't seem hungover, tired or grumpy, and his attitude was positive and friendly, which makes me feel almost guilty talking (or joking) about the service. But it was that bad. From stupid things like saying "Diet Coke" when delivering our three coffees (and no sodas) to more annoying things like when I said "I'll have French toast with bacon" and having him say "OK...you said sausage, right?" the service was like something out of Candid Camera. But like I said, it's a little harder to complain when the guy really seems to be trying.

Our food IMO was eh. Dad and I had the French toast which comes with either two meager strips of bacon or two large-ish links of kinda sweet tasting sausage. The bacon tasted good but if you're looking to stuff yourself, sausage is the clear winner. The French toast itself is a big portion and topped with tasty chopped apples that had been sauteed, most likely, in butter, cinnamon and sugar.

My mother got eggs Jessica - poached eggs with potato pancakes and a condiment of bacon bits and chives. The potato pancakes looked more like a Sysco crab cake; nothing like any church picnic potato pancakes I've enjoyed in my lifetime. Still, Mom ate both (food is one of the few areas where she's just not all that discerning).

Any of you who have read my posts know that I love a good brunch. Although there was nothing horrible about brunch at Clyde's, I absolutely will not be putting it into my rotation of go-to spots.

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Almost a week after my brunch at Clyde's, it occurred to me that I had skipped the weirdest part of our service there. I asked our server if they served lattes. He said "no, but I can try to make something pretty close to that." :lol:

If you're looking for espresso beverages, you might want to skip Clyde's.

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Wow...I really will do anything other than write my grad school papers right now, which is why I'm posting about Clyde's of Tysons Corner at 10:57 a.m. on a Sunday. :angry:

So anyway...found myself with a friend at the TC Clyde's last night for dinner because:

a) I live in McLean and might as well give up

:) Please don't tell me Colvin Run is across the street because, did I mention I was a grad student? Without reservations?

c) OpenTable told me it was either Clyde's or somewhere actually in the TC mall, and I like to think that freestanding is somehow better

But you know, it was just a nice, easy dinner. Pretty atmosphere (yes, white Christmas lights are cheesy, but so am I), seated immediately, friendly and capable server, good roast chicken and asparagus, better than average French martini, and desserts on other tables looked (and smelled) great even though I didn't have enough room (or money.) Just an overall nice, no-brainer dinner out.

So if you ever find yourself in the TC area at dinnertime with no reservations and little more than a $20, I'd give the TC Clyde's an "Eh? Why not!" seal of approval.

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So if you ever find yourself in the TC area at dinnertime with no reservations and little more than a $20, I'd give the TC Clyde's an "Eh? Why not!" seal of approval.

This basically describes the entire chain. You will never have a 4 four store dining experience, but you probably will never go wrong.

The desserts at Tower Oaks are really good too. The menu does vary some throughout the different locations. They are not exact carbon copies.

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I don't know if it is currently on the menu at all Clydes, but at the Chevy Chase location, there is an appetizer that is very good. It is a crab tower and at its base is a crispy rice cake followed by a very generous portion of fresh crab meat. There is some green on top of that but I am not sure what it is. And on the very top, sliced avocado and a crispy wonton. Of the two times I have tried it, I have really enjoyed it.

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Well no, it isn't fine cuisine. But it's rather dependable for simple, uncomplicated meals. And its prices are considerably lower than most other fine dining restaurants. Where can you find anything better at that price point?

-Ed

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All this praise for Clyde's! Perhaps I should put aside my snobbery and head to the Friendship Heights location tomorow. I am looking for an uncomplicated and inexpensive meal for an out of town guest tomorrow in my neighborhood (and he hates Indian, so no Indique Heights). If we go, I will report back.

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Just moved to the Milbrook @ Mark Center. I carpool with a friend/coworker and my fiancee, so the Clyde's a few blocks from my front door is a good choice for when no one feels like cooking or we just want to do a good happy hour - and they DO have some good happy hour specials (I think something like 20% off whatever, $4 burgers, $6 crab cakes, half-off oysters, etc.).

"Chain" is not a dirty word to me.

As with all Clyde's, the decorations and atmosphere make the experience. The Mark Center location boasts a hunting lodge, a crew bar, a regatta room, a New England bar, and the host station is meant to be reminiscent of the lobby of a Vermont hotel.

I really enjoy the crab dip - it's creamy, well prepared, and actually full of crab.

I LOVE their raw oyster selection. Then again, I've never had raw oysters before - I just know that to me they taste really, really good. The burgers are also decent.

One thing that's really hit or miss is the service. I had one of the best waiters I've ever had, but other times service has been slooooooooow. Also watch out for the clientele. You'll have a lot of out-of-towners who just want to bother you with their out-of-towniness. You'll see what I mean if you go.

So when I don't feel like driving all the way to the bar at Palena or any of the many finer bistros/lounges in the city, Clyde's is a great alternative close to home.

Unless, of course, anyone has any better suggestions in the area.

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As I've mentioned, I am not opposed to having lunch at the Clyde's at Tower Oaks. I think it's a wonderful space, the service is bad, but not awful, the beer is cold and fresh, and it's possible to find something to eat. Sitting at the large, beautiful bar for a lunch of oysters and beer on a Fall afternoon is actually a treat.

The one time I tried to have dinner there, I made a reservation for 7PM on a Friday night. We arrived at 6:50 and checked in. The young lady said it would be a few minutes. At 7:02PM I asked if our table would be ready, and she dismissed me with "it'll be another 10-15 minutes." Well, let's just say I didn't appreciate the tone of her voice or her casual dismissiveness and was compelled to tell her so and we left.

Last night, my wife asked if I would try again. Gladly, I replied. Did we need a reservation, she asked? Of course not, I said. Its's 7:30 on a Tuesday, August 1st in Washington DC. This city is deserted. You could walk right into any restaurant in town, I added. There would not be 20 people there I assured her.

Wrong. The parking lot was grid-locked and the wait for a table, we were informed, would be 20-25 minutes, and possibly more for a particular dining room (as opposed to the bar).

Am I missing something? There are lots of restaurant reasonably nearby, so it's not a supply issue. Are they giving away free drinks? What is going on?

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Am I missing something? There are lots of restaurant reasonably nearby, so it's not a supply issue. Are they giving away free drinks? What is going on?

I don't think it's the food. With the Tower Oaks complex, I think Clyde's is playing the clubby-but-not-a-club card perfectly. This is where Rockvillians take their families and visiting friends when they don't have a membership at Congressional, and they don't feel like spending the money to drag the kids to the Old Angler's Inn or Normandie Farm. Slap a polo shirt on little Timmy and let him order a burger. The food is serviceable enough, and it's an easy crowd-pleaser.

IMHO.

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The food is serviceable enough, and it's an easy crowd-pleaser.
I couldn't agree more. Mine is the Mark Center location, and I don't think I've ever seen so many families, out-of-towners, tourists, tour groups, day-trippers, excursionists, sightseers, visitors, clubs, brotherhoods, and yes, even the occassional itinerant biker gang packed into one restaurant. It's the REAL melting pot.
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I don't think it's the food. With the Tower Oaks complex, I think Clyde's is playing the clubby-but-not-a-club card perfectly. This is where Rockvillians take their families and visiting friends when they don't have a membership at Congressional, and they don't feel like spending the money to drag the kids to the Old Angler's Inn or Normandie Farm. Slap a polo shirt on little Timmy and let him order a burger. The food is serviceable enough, and it's an easy crowd-pleaser.
I think you got that exactly right based on our acquaintances. It's an alternative to one's club with very safe choices and a pretty setting - a "nice" place to take the family after Parker's first communion, or graduation, or whatever.
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I don't think it's the food. With the Tower Oaks complex, I think Clyde's is playing the clubby-but-not-a-club card perfectly. This is where Rockvillians take their families and visiting friends when they don't have a membership at Congressional, and they don't feel like spending the money to drag the kids to the Old Angler's Inn or Normandie Farm. Slap a polo shirt on little Timmy and let him order a burger. The food is serviceable enough, and it's an easy crowd-pleaser.

IMHO.

Funny you say that. Instead of waiting for a table we went to our Club for dinner instead. And if you know anything about country club food, you know that we probably would have been better off waiting.

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Am I missing something? There are lots of restaurant reasonably nearby, so it's not a supply issue. Are they giving away free drinks? What is going on?
Clyde's happy hour is a pretty good deal if you like half price oysters (and who doesn't?).

The oyster shucker at Mark's Place is a gem and a whiz. I don't think I've ever had pieces of shell in with my oysters there, which is more than you can say about most places.

The bar menu during happy hour also includes half price burgers, half price crab cakes, artichoke dip, caesar salad, nice things to eat along with decent draft beer. Hits the spot after a hard day at work.

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Clydes is expanding out to Loudon County with Willow Creek Farm this winter. 42920 Broadlands Blvd., Broadlands. Wherever that is.

Come on, you don't know where Broadlands is? It's just north of Ashburn and Brambleton. Everyone knows where those places are, right? :)

Seriously, this is a good move by Clyde's -- and a natural expansion of their market.

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A new location has opened up in Ashburn that they are calling Willow Creek Farm. Similar in size to Tower Oaks Lodge and a similarly impressive looking place. This one has five bars and sprawls through three 19th century barns transplanted from Vermont, with one room even having a half dozen horse drawn carriages suspended from the ceiling.

The most remarkable thing about it - one room is reserved as Jackets Required for men after 4 but with the same menu as the rest of the restaurant. Citronelle, The Prime Rib, Inn at Little Washington and Clyde's Ashburn. Which of these doesn't belong?

The most unremarkable thing - yep, you guessed it. The food. Typical Clyde's. Inoffensive, but nothing better than you'd expect.

How much money must they spend on these places? But with the probably 300 plus tables completely filled on a Thursday night, I guess they make the investment back. And if the reaction of a friend of mine who I would think should know better - "This is the nicest restaurant I've ever been to" - is any indication, they know what they are doing.

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A new location has opened up in Ashburn that they are calling Willow Creek Farm. Similar in size to Tower Oaks Lodge and a similarly impressive looking place. This one has five bars and sprawls through three 19th century barns transplanted from Vermont, with one room even having a half dozen horse drawn carriages suspended from the ceiling.

The most remarkable thing about it - one room is reserved as Jackets Required for men after 4 but with the same menu as the rest of the restaurant. Citronelle, The Prime Rib, Inn at Little Washington and Clyde's Ashburn. Which of these doesn't belong?

The most unremarkable thing - yep, you guessed it. The food. Typical Clyde's. Inoffensive, but nothing better than you'd expect.

How much money must they spend on these places? But with the probably 300 plus tables completely filled on a Thursday night, I guess they make the investment back. And if the reaction of a friend of mine who I would think should know better - "This is the nicest restaurant I've ever been to" - is any indication, they know what they are doing.

As a resident of SoLoCo (I just made that up) -- I'm just happy to have another decent restaurant around here. Now that Twinsmommy and I are finally going to try to get out to eat once in a while, having a closer option for Clyde's calamari is ok by me.

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While I am not a member of Slow Food, I am on the mailing list for the local group. This just in:

Putting Food Back in the Farm Bill

Congress is working on formulating the 2007 Farm Bill, broad-based legislation that will direct the nation’s agriculture and nutrition policy for the next five years. Heard about this massive piece of legislation that sets up the way the American food system is organized and determines what gets served in schools, hospitals and nursing homes? Want to learn more about why the Farm Bill affects the food you can buy, who grows it, under what conditions, and how much it costs? Then join us for an open discussion with a panel of experts on:

Putting Food Back in the Farm Bill.

WHEN: Monday, May 21, 5:00 -- 7:00

WHERE: Clyde’s of Gallery Place, 707 7th Street, NW

COST: $10.00 per person, hors d’oeuvre 5:00-5:30, cash bar, followed by discussion

MODERATOR: Judith Weinraub: Jefferson Fellow and former staff reporter for Washington Post Food section

PANEL: Jim Crawford, with his wife Moie Kimball Crawford, own and operate New Morning Farm, a 95-acre certified organic vegetable farm in south-central Pennsylvania, where they have farmed organically for over 30 years. In 1988, the Cawfords founded the Tuscarora Organic Growers wholesale marketing coop, where other local family farms work together to complement one another rather than compete. The coop has become a model for similar programs around the country.

Dan Imhoff is the author of many books and articles on food and environmental issues. His most recent book is Food Fight, a Citizen's Guide to the Farm Bill, which demystifies the massive legislation, and explains its complexity and relevance in everyday terms.

Tom Meyer is executive vice president of Clyde’s Restaurant Group, which he joined in 1983 and where he’s presided over its produce program where local farmers deliver to the restaurants. A Culinary Institute of America-trained chef, he has made a career out of fine-tuning the great American saloon menu. A fundamental part of that effort has been providing its restaurants with high-quality ingredients.

Gus Schumacher was Undersecretary of Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services in the Clinton administration and before that a commissioner of Food and Agriculture for the State of Massachusetts. As a consultant, he currently shares his knowledge about farms, fuels and agri-food industries for several groups, including the WP Kellogg Foundation.

This event is sponsored by: American Farmland Trust, Clyde’s Restaurant Group and Slow Food

To reserve your seat, please contact Alexandra Greeley at cookasia@verizon.net; send check made out to Slow Food DC, and mail to:Alexandra Greeley, 11548 Links Drive, Reston VA 20190

RESERVATION DEADLINE: May 17

Questions? Call Marsha Weiner 703-370-2118

Want to continue the conversation over dinner after?

Let us know and we can make a group reservation at Clyde's (standard menu).

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Putting Food Back in the Farm Bill.

WHEN: Monday, May 21, 5:00 -- 7:00

WHERE: Clyde’s of Gallery Place, 707 7th Street, NW

I attended this last night, and I have to say I find it ironic that it was held at Clyde's. I don't wish to demean the restaurant group for hosting this event, and certainly Tom Meyer did a respectable job on the panel. But what a contrast to hear people wax so poetically about locally raised agrigulture, about the plight of small farmers, about sustainability, about how 70% of the money in the Farm Bill goes to only 10% of farms, about how the Farm Bill is dominated by special interests and large conglomerates, about our nation's obesity epidemic, about how our schools are feeding our children calories instead of nutrition ... only to experience firsthand during dinner much of what was discussed, or should I say disgust, as the attendees seemed to turn a blind eye to the fact that they were essentially eating their own words.

Cheers,

Rocks.

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