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Found 137 results

  1. Our own oliveDC (Metrocurean) is reporting on her blog that Mendocino Grille and Sonoma's owners are planning a Bethesda outpost for spring of 2008, to be called Pacific. It will have a wine bar like Sonoma and offer breakfast and a small gourmet market. Griz Dwight of Grizform Design, who designed Black's Bar and Kitchen and PS 7 is the designer.
  2. We're going to see some friends play Friday night at an Irish bar called Flanagans on Cordell Avenue and want to have dinner beforehand. What's good these days in the moderate category near the bar so we can park early and then walk? --- [The following posts have been split into separate threads: Flanagan's Irish Pub (ustreetguy) Buono Sera (porcupine) Kabob Bazaar (Pool Boy) Bangkok Garden (Pool Boy) Grapeseed (Choirgirl21) Parking in Bethesda (jrichstar) Tout de Sweet (jandres374) Freddy's Lobster and Clams (jandres374) Pizzeria Da Marco (Pool Boy) Jetties (jandres374) Bold Bite (Pool Boy) bd's Mongolian Grill (jandres374) Red Tomato (Pool Boy)]
  3. Anil Kumar is now at Bethesda Curry Kitchen, right across the street from Grapeseed, which opened on Tuesday, February 11th. On this very cold evening, the nearly empty restaurant seemed like an eternity away from Gringos & Mariachis, just a few blocks down Cordell Avenue, and which also opened on February 11th. I have no doubt that on this evening, Gringos & Mariachis was packed. A liquor license is still a few weeks away, so for now, this restaurant is without alcohol. I started my dinner with a homemade Mango Lassi ($3.50) which reminded me that Kumar's former restaurant, Saveur India, had some of the best Kulfi I've ever tried - Bethesda Curry Kitchen also has homemade Kulfi on their dessert menu. Chef Kumar is from Hyderabad, a huge city in the South of India, and the south is very well-represented on the menu. The city of Coorg sits about 400 miles southwest of Hyderabad, nestled in the Western Ghats. When I go to India for the first time, my plan is to spend some time in Goa, but a detour to Coorg is also on the agenda. Coorgi Chicken ($15.99) isn't a dish you see very often in the DC area, but it was very well-executed here, and obviously long-cooked, containing 5-6 boneless, Halal thighs in a wonderful curry (the quality of this chicken was very high). Served with basmati rice, I also got a Mehti Paratha ($3.00) for the requisite sauce dunking. On a frigid Saturday night, there was only one other family of four dining in this somewhat stark, utilitarian restaurant. "Until you get your liquor license, weekend dinners during the winter are going to break your heart," I said to my server. I cannot think of an atmosphere that's more different from Gringos & Mariachis than Bethesda Curry Kitchen, but both restaurants are initialized in Italic in the Dining Guide which speaks volumes about the potential quality of cooking here. Also just down Cordell Avenue from Passage To India, I don't even see the two as competitors - one is a curry house; the other is fine dining. Bethesda Curry Kitchen is going to survive, not by weekend dinners, but by delivery and lunch buffets. I walked past the empty buffet - which had the signs up - and noticed that my Coorgi Chicken was on it, so you can enjoy this exact same dish for lunch, with many others to accompany it, for less money. In fact, until they get their liquor license, a lunch buffet would be the perfect way to initiate yourselves with this fine newcomer.
  4. In business more than 30 years, Georgetown Bagelry is the best bagel provider in the greater DC area imho. They boil, which eliminates most of the chains and others around from real competition. Beyond that, the flour, technique and ingredients they use all reflect a business serious about creating a high quality, authentic product. Finally, Georgetown Bagelry (though not in Georgetown) is a small local business with good people and values. They deserve lots and lots of support.
  5. You're thinking of the pop up that came after/during TapaBar. It has now re-opened as R Family Kitchen and Bar, and supposedly has Pho, although I can't confirm that. "R Family Kitchen & Bar Opens in Former TapaBar Space" by Joe Zimmermann on bethesdamagazine.com --- Edit: Looks like they only have chicken or veggie pho, which is disappointing.
  6. Haandi in Bethesda is now Kadhai. Interesting...this is from Robert Dyer on his excellent Bethesda blog. http://robertdyer.blogspot.com/2013/05/haandi-changes-name-to-kadhai-in.html The gist is, Haandi in Bethesda changed its name...don't know if it's with the same owner/management or not. If you look at Haandi's web site is says the Bethesda location is permanently closed. The other location seems unaffected. There are a bunch of new menu items as well.
  7. Foong Li is not great, but it isn't nauseating. We've been all over the menu at Foong Li, trying the familiar and the not-so-familar and while we have had dishes we didn't like, none were as bad as those at HEOTB. Are you telling me that we shouldn't order spicy shrimp wonton (and if so, why?) or that they are supposed to served in a greasy glop? Are you telling me that a dish that is supposed to have ginger and scallions, but has no ginger is the fault of the Westerner who ordered? Maybe I am supposed to know that authentic Chinese ginger is flavorless? Sorry - I really think this was bad cooking, not bad choosing.
  8. (The Google couldn't find an individual thread about this place, just a couple of posts in Dining In Bethesda) I've only been to Bistro LaZeez for lunch, and found the food pretty good, with a couple of exceptions. The chicken sandwiches can be a little dry, so ask for extra sauce. Their felafel sandwich is my favorite: cruchy felafel with plenty of tahini, and lots of delicious slices of pickled turnip. Mazzas have been tasty, but IMO the hummus is better at Lebanese Taverna so get the Baba Ghanouj instead. Lentil soup was disappointing, consisting of just a few lentils floating in a thin, sour broth. Grilled chicken is very tasty. It's a cute little place, service is pleasant, and the owner is very nice.
  9. Walked by at lunch and saw the Now Open sign out front. Turns out it was their opening day. Hope springs eternal when it comes to Bethesda delis, so I decided to give it a shot. It's pretty bare bones space, with a handful of tables inside and an outdoor space with a few plastic tables. But delis don't need to be fancy if the food is good. There the news is somewhat hopeful. The matzo ball soup is solid, with a big fluffy ball and broth that could have been a bit more flavorful but overall was very nice. My litmus test for delis is pastrami. Heckman's is solidly in the thick-cut pastrami camp and the good news is that it's undeniably juicy and well-balanced. But it's also uncomfortably fatty -- not the unctuous kind of fat that melts in your mouth but the kind that makes the sandwich hard to eat when it's stacked high. I ended up trimming some of the fat myself and then enjoyed the sandwich. Surprisingly, they didn't have pickles, which at a deli is unfathomable but presumably will be rectified soon. Service was somewhat confused, which is not surprising on day one. To be fair to the wait staff, I think the problems largely originated in the kitchen. Overall, I'm somewhat more hopeful than some of the other delis that have come and gone in Bethesda.
  10. There's a sign in the window of the old Ben & Jerry's saying the place is leased. 'Bold Bites' is the name of the place I think. No idea when it'll open.
  11. Now open in former Black Finn space. "Tapa Bar Opens in Bethesda" by Aaron Kraut on bethesdamagazine.com
  12. In the old Levante's space, which is closing at the end of the year. Planned opening for the spring. Clickety. Even as casual as this seems to be, it could instantly be one of the best restaurants in mediocre-heavy Bethesda.
  13. Not sure if an actual thread is started yet (if so please merge), but per this link: "Small Bites: Community Diner Targeting Late Summer Opening in Bethesda" by Andrew Metcalf on bethesdamagazine.com it was to have opened by 'late summer 2016' but I can tell you it is still not open and it is officially fall. That being said, I am interested in seeing it open soon as I would like to check it out. From the construction looks, I still think it is at least 2 to 3 months away though.
  14. Hello Everyone! I just wanted to introduce our company and myself to this great community! My name is Luis Saavedra and am the general manager for Takeout Taxi in Montgomery County and Upper NW DC. We deliver freshly prepared meals from more than 150 restaurant partners in the area. Anyone can find out a little bit more about our company at http://www.MealsToYou.com. Any comments, questions and/or feedback will be greatly appreciated! Thanks Don Rockwell for the opportunity to participate. Luis
  15. Update on the Bethesda Fine Dining Location, which reports a May opening (credit--Bethesda Magazine)
  16. Dropped by (apparently) the first non-airport location of Vino Volo on Bethesda Row. The left side is a cafe, the right side a wine shop (honestly, I didn't walk around that side, but that's what it looked like.) We sat at the bar and just barely made it in time to order a few tasting flights ("Malbec Madness" for her, "Spanish Armada" for me.) It's a cute little space. Seems to try to be an urban farmhouse - there's some wooden crate decorations, retro filament lighting, like that. We were just nibbling, but tried a nice plate of pitted seasoned olives and the pork tacos, which needed the lime wedge that garnished it. From what I gather, their big thing is the "vino chart", which is a graphic representation of the wine's flavor profile. (For wine dummies like me, I admit to appreciating the effort.) "Complexity" is the x-axis and "Fruit" on the y-axis; the graphic is also divided into four quadrants, so from (x,y=0,0) clockwise, it's: "light", "bright", "rich", "brooding." (Better visualization below - this is the general one on their website, but each wine ends up with a dot on the graphic.) Soooo ... seems nice. Happy Hour is half-price off "bites and flights", and runs 4-6pm, which is a nice deal if you want to try some different things. I ended up also trying a flight of rosé (and discovering the Boxwood 2012 is really pretty tasty.) I guess we'd go back.
  17. According to Robert Dyer, this will be a new concept at Montgomery Mall from Bob's and Bob's Shanghai: "Shanghai 66 Innovative Kitchen Coming To Bethesda"
  18. Last night, we went to Raku in Bethesda again. My wife and I always seem to enjoy their cooking. I've heard not so great things about the Dupont Circule location so we always trek up to Bethesda. Anyone have opinions on the Dupont outlet? As for our meal, we started off with their Tuna Tartare which blew us away. It is an amble size portion of tuna, a very nice green, citrusy accompanying sauce and a few slices of perfectly crisped, but not toasted, baguette. They also include a small green leaf salad with a nice vingarette that has a bit of a zing. This was the first time I tried this dish and I wish I had ordered it all for myself as an entree. We also had a yellowtail and scallion roll for appetizer. It was very good. We usually find their sushi to be good quality. My wife had their Tokyo Dashi soup for an entree. She chose to have it with udon (big white wheat) noodles and vegetables and tofu. My wife loves this soup and I'm a big fan too. You can pick what types of noodles or meat or fish you want in them. It doesn't matter though because the broth is the same and it is the best part. It is a medium brown color that has a rich flavor that manages to feel light in your mouth too. It is also a steal at around $6-8 for a big bowl. I wasn't super hungry so I had their "healthy tofu" salad which is actually quite large and it was very good. It has lots of cubes of soft, silken tofu that is very fresh and then a melange of different salads veggies. Some western: lettuce and shaved carrot and peanuts and some eastern: seaweed salad. It has a citrus vinagrette too which may be yuzu flavored. A nice dish which would probably be a good appetizer to share. Overall, another nice visit. The only two downside to Raku is that it is often busy with waits and it can get loud when full, but it is much more bearable than some other places.
  19. Bar Oysters - $1.35 each. Their menu says "We are Currently Receiving the Freshest Oysters Available on the East Coast," and I have no reason to doubt them. The problem lies with the word "receiving." Figuring the bar oysters would be whatever they had the most of, or weren't selling that night, I ordered a dozen. To my horror, the bartender began pulling preshucked oysters out from beneath the bar. He assembled the platter, then walked it back to the kitchen, where the chef took hold of it, and like the Road Runner pecking at bird seed, leaned down and gave a fake millisecond-long sniff to about four of the oysters. It was the same shtick they put on at BlackSalt, but he wasn't actually smelling them; he was simply putting on a show - it reminded me of what I've recently seen twice at an otherwise great wine bar (Taberna del Alabardero), where the bartender opens the bottle, touches the cork to his nose without sniffing it, and then pours the glass of wine. Please don't bother doing this stuff: It's pretentious and anyone who knows what they're doing will realize you're just going through the motions. The platter arrived, and the oysters looked good and fresh, and when I smelled one myself, there was no odor. That's because icing down an oyster can work wonders in terms of masking its flaws; it's only when you eat it, and the temperature quickly rises inside your mouth to 60, 70, 80 degrees up to a theoretical maximum of 98.6 - that's the moment of truth, and that's when oysters that haven't been freshly shucked reveal their flaws, which lie entirely in the finish and not in the nose, tasting like bad sea urchin. 'How are the oysters?' the bartender asked, after I had eaten one. 'When were they shucked? The first one I had wasn't fresh.' 'Oh, about an hour ago. They shuck them for Happy Hour and keep the extras on ice.' This conversation took place at 9 PM this evening. The Black's Seafood Gumbo was not cooked properly. The shrimp was still cold - colder than room temperature - but the andouille sausage was piping hot. Three bites and done with it. The beer and wine list is laughable. Fifty bucks wasted. Rocks
  20. I will be taking the Executive Chef role at Barrel and Crow in Bethesda. We plan to offer regional American food mostly in the the $18 to $24 range for dinner, along with a couple items in the $30 range. We are looking to be a great neighborhood restaurant for people to come to and enjoy some great comforting food and drink, at a decent price point. We are hoping to open in about 4 weeks with a little luck. I have attached a sample of the opening dinner menu, still haven't tested everything yet so there could be some small changes. Barrel and Crow Opening Dinner Menu.pdf
  21. Please feel free to merge if there is an existing thread (I could not find it). Chicken on the Run...is it a micro-local chain or a stand alone joint? I really don't care. I'm now working in Bethesda again (woo-hoo!) and I noticed this place even before my first day yesterday and I knew I needed to try it. Wow. This is possibly the best peruvian chicken I have tasted, with Que Rico fighting for the title but losing by a hair (and it is way up in Owings Mills, MD). I think it must be the charcoal flavor/wood flavor I am tasting that makes me giddy. The mild sauce is very good, and the green hot sauce is nice, better than just pure pureed jalapenos, but still not up to the level of Que Rico in Owings Mills -- not 'creamy' enough while retaining heat (too watery). The rice is good, but not what I ordered but it was so busy I did not bother to try to get it fixed. The yuca was really nice and lightly treated in the fryer. I hope to go back and try the fries and salad next time. While I did not try the corn, it looked weak. My only real complaint about the place is that their chickens are, um, small. Or maybe that is just how they cut them. My quarter dark meat section was pretty small by my standard, which is OK since I am on a diet and this was and never will be diet food, but I thought I'd mention it for those who might care (like me when I really want to fall off the wagon, hard.)...
  22. One that comes to mind for me is Grapeseed in Bethesda. Had a great meal there last month. I find this to be one of the highlights of the Bethesda restaurant scene. There are so many restaurants downtown, but hardly any GOOD ones. Anyone have any thoughts on this place?
  23. Has anyone tried the recently-opened Fresh Baguette in Bethesda? The pictures on their Facebook page look great, for whatever that's worth.
  24. A few months ago, a few other Indian-food lovers and I saw the sign for Tandoori Nights in Clarendon lit up and were excited to try another new Indian restaurant. Alas, we were fooled, as the only thing fully operational was the bright orange sign. Now that is has opened, we decided it was time to try again (last night). I was looking for a menu online so I could get the exact names of the dishes but I was foiled. You'll just have to go off of my memory. I did, however find Eve Zibart's review of Tandoori nights in Gaithersburg from 2002 plus this article originally linked on these boards. The interior is very sleek and...orange. As we were escorted to our table, we passed a glassed-in section that seems like it would be nice for a large group - though we did remark it couldn't be very good for a private party since it was glassed-in like the snake viewing rooms at the zoo . We were seated at a table, but there are several booths with hareem like drapes over the top which looked a bit nicer than where we were sitting. We had to pull salt and pepper from a different table, but our water glasses were filled within a minute of sitting down. Unfortunately, that was the highlight of the service. The papadums came out with three sauces - tamarind (which I love), an uninspired mint chutney, and what is apparently a lentil puree that looked like chinese mustard, but with a hint of (at least last night) citrus that made it excellent. My companion's salted lassi came out with not enough salt (which seems to be a common problem, or at least in my experience) but that was easily rectified. I ordered a glass of wine later, which unfortunately sat forgotten on the bar until I reminded the waiter. We skipped the starters, and ordered a lamb rogan josh, another lamb dish (i think it started with a P) and a vegetable and paneer dish which was billed as a chef's specialty. We also ordered a garlic naan and a plain naan to eat along with the dishes. The rogan josh was excellent, warm, but not as spicy as I would have liked, and I'm really regretting not knowing the name of the other lamb dish because that is one you should order. The potatoes were an afterthought, but the sauce was worth writing home about. My paneer and vegetables was just alright, which was disappointing. The garlic naan was just crusted with garlic, which i particularly like and the regular naan did the job. Overall, a good experience. Who else has gone (to either location)?
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