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Found 663 results

  1. I was walking around at lunch today and passed by 100 King St (vacant for awhile) and notice a bunch of permits on the windows and obvious demolition going on. Went back to the office and did a bit of digging and found a submission by Carluccios on the upcoming docket of the Board of Architectural Reviews. Apparently a UK based Italian chain. Carluccios.pdf
  2. pure food and wine Vegan, raw (nothing cooked above 118 degrees), no soy or wheat.. I took a vegetarian friend there last weekend and was wowed. The food was delicious and inventive, more so than at any other place in Manhattan at which I've recently dined. It knocked the socks of wd-50. I strongly recommend the zuchinni blossoms for a main course, which are filled with faux chevre (derived from nuts, I believe) and served with a grape tomato, ramp, and avocado salad and a side of pickled almonds. Also wonderful was the thin mint sundae. I don't know they made vegan, soyless ice cream taste so good, but they did. I went in a skeptic and left an admirer. Go! It's at 17th St and Irving Place (between 3rd and Park), about a block and a half east of Union Square.
  3. I like DC Coast (not sure why it doesn't get more coverage... maybe because of the lobbyist/expense account scene that seems to go on there). If for lunch, have the shrimp and grits. If dinner, they generally do good things with scallops, or there's the signature wok smoked lobster.
  4. Is Kevin Sbraga going to be opening an outpost of Sbraga in Washington, DC? Source: Eater Philly Eater DC is reporting that Philly Top Chef champ Kevin Sbraga is opening an outpost of Sbraga in the nation's capital. Apparently Sbraga & Co. are looking at sites in D.C. proper for the restaurant, with the hope of getting something signed before 2013 closes out. In the meantime, Sbraga is finishing up work on The Fat Ham, his ode to Southern cuisine in UCity. Read full article >>
  5. You know, this place is surprising good. Not just better than the few other non-chains in Greenbelt, but I've actually had a couple meals here that I wouldn't be upset with even if I were eating at a Thai restaurant in DC proper. Not somewhere that anyone needs to go out of their way for, but for people working in Greenbelt (or even living here...gasp) I think this might be as good as it gets. I'd love someone to point out somewhere better to eat in Greenbelt, from what I've gathered so far its got two of every chain and not much else in terms of dining options.
  6. I could not find a thread for this restaurant. I'm curious about it as it's very near my house and it made Sietsema's restaurant guide for 2009. Has anyone been there? Can you recommend any particular dishes? Any other advice? Thanks.
  7. Old Arlington Grill - which is on the opposite side of the entrance to Arlington Cinema 'N' Drafthouse as the underrated Mazagan, is closed, and there's a banner up for a new restaurant which is coming. For the life of me, I can't remember the name of the restaurant (it caught me off-guard), but it's something ethnic - maybe Thai. If anyone is driving by on Columbia Pike, take a peak at the sign and let us know?
  8. What's the word on this place? Read a blurb about it in Washingtonian - anyone a regular? How do you order your burrito (heard there was a special way, kinda like In-N-Out Double Double Animal Style)? How does it compare to Mixtec (which, IMHO, is the best take-out burrito in the city)? Apologies if there is a post about this somewhere, didn't find one... Thanks!
  9. Beau Thai had a 1 hour 30 minute wait for delivery, so we decided to try out the new Zabver Thai (which for now is only take-out, and 3 tables to eat at in take out containers) on Mt. Pleasant street (the old Adam Express location). WOW. First of all the place has had a total makeover - it is still small, and mainly take-out (with three tables) but it looks MUCH better and is WAY cleaner. Also, there is a whole new kitchen in the back. The owners, a husband and wife team, are two of the nicest people I have ever met in a restaurant - seriously. They really are happy to be in the neighborhood, want to get to know their customers, and are just delightful. When I got there they were busy with take out and a couple of tables eating in. The menu is a large assortment of mostly Thai dishes. A lot of things looked good - i ordered the Golden Triangle, curry puffs, veggie spring rolls, and Penang curry with chicken (thai spicy). The owner wanted to make sure I wanted it Thai spicy, and she seemed tickled pink I was ordering it that way. She was happy to show me where she wrote it on the order. I heard a lot of other orders being ordered Thai spicy, so I think the secret is out that you can get real hot food there. While I waited I chatted with the owner - they are planning on doing take out soon, and are also renovating the upstairs to become a dining room. They wanted to start small and grow into the space, which seems wise. The chef is the original chef from Kanlaya Thai (from back when it was great). The spring rolls and golden triangles were both better versions than the typical, but not revelatory. The curry puffs were the best I have ever had, and the dipping sauce was exceptional. The penang curry was indeed Thai spicy, and rich. It's the best one I have had in the city. I am really looking forward to ordering from them again, and I wish them a lot of success.
  10. It's a rather open looking yellow cart. I'm not sure how it's going to handle the winter weather. There are two food options - bulgogi and chicken teriyaki. Both are made on the spot in woks. All choices come on rice with a side of iceberg lettuce with a soy sauce-based dressing and kimchee. You can also ask for sriracha if you want. The bulgogi was decent - not anything spectacular, but compared to a lot of what I've had within DC pretty good and a good deal at $6.75. The kimchee wasn't too fermented, so the cabbage was still light and crisp. I'm not sure if that will change the longer they're in business. They have some sundries - chips, Doritos, sodas and Gatorade. I wish they would have more Korean-type sundries, but at the same time I don't know how successful that would be for the area. But for a first foray into ethnic food cart, I'm pretty satisfied. It will certainly satisfy the Korean BBQ jones when I don't feel like driving out of the city.
  11. Social Oyster Bar is apparently a new restaurant in McLean. The menu looks somewhat interesting. I'll probably take the kids there tomorrow night to check it out. Anyone else been?
  12. Down an out of the way road in Jessup, a group of friends and I had a fun evening at Blob's Park Bavarian Beer Garden last night. I had heard stories of this place for some time. A few of my childhood friends' parents used to got here for literal buckets of beer and dancing when I was growing up in the area. The space is huge, designed to seat 800 people. We were lucky to have the evening's band be Steve Meisner and his polka band from Madison, WI. There are regulars to this place, their tables marked with wood plaques engraved with their names. There were a lot of families with children running around. We ordered pitchers of Spaten pils and octoberfest to start- no more buckets. Too bad. We then got several appetizers including their pork wings, sausage plates, and very salty Bavarian radishes. I had a weisswurst plate, and then a taste of their German chocolate cake. While the cuisine was not stellar, the atmosphere was the real draw. The polka band started up at 8, and was greeted by a line of regulars who stood in front playing instruments like tambourine and washboards to the first song. Then everyone danced polka or western swing or whatever to the night's sets of music. It felt like night in the Midwest again.
  13. This place opened up on Duke St where Maggio used to be, by the bike shop. The menu looked so interested - typical kebabs, hummus, dolma and the like. But, there were many other things I've never heard of - stews, fried fish dishes, lamb shank, etc. It had the feel of Amoo's - families, native languages heard, family owned and operated, but it's Iraqi not Iranian. From the few yelp reviews, this is the only Iraqi place in the area and the Iraqi community is very excited and impressed with the cooking. The place was packed, almost all middle eastern crowd. We tried to place a carryout order and they just couldn't get to us - after over ten minutes, we still couldn't place an order so ended up leaving. I know they were super busy, but we were starving and had some little kids involved and it wasn't going to work out. The food I saw looked impressive, they have Iraqi breakfast at 9a and it looks like a real solid operation. I'll try again to eat there soon, but when someone else goes, please report!
  14. Warren Rojas is one of our area's most underrated restaurant critics. He first wrote about La Caraqueña here, in the October issue of Northern Virginia magazine. Take a look at those pictures of the arepas. Todd Kliman than picked up on it in Washingtonian here, and between the two positive reviews, I felt negligent for not having tried it myself. La Caraqueña has a bright new sign outside, but sits in the parking lot of what can only be called a fleabag motel. As I drove into the parking lot, I said out loud to myself, "God this place is a dump." That impression went away the moment I walked into the restaurant - a completely empty restaurant at 12:45 on a weekday. Warren's review was on the wall, and a gentleman was standing behind the cash register, all by himself. "Do you do carryout?" I asked him. He handed me a menu, which I began to look over. Then I looked up at him, and asked, "Do you make your salteñas here?" The look I got was a curious mixture of politeness, frustration, and what amounted to almost complete dismissal. "Yes," he said. "We make everything here." "I'll take two of them to go." I stood around waiting, and after a moment, he said, "It's going to take about fifteen minutes. You might want to have a look at the paintings on the wall [for sale], or have a seat." So I went out, made a quick call, then came back in, grabbed a menu, and sat at a table and waited. I read that all items are cooked to order, and that this is not fast food - they don't even have a paper carryout menu. After a couple of minutes, he came back out to the register, and asked me if I'd ever been in before. I told him no, but that I liked the salteñas at El Pike in Seven Corners. He perked up. "You've been to El Pike?" he said. "Yes. I don't like the ones at Luzmila's [down the street] as much because they use a lot of sugar." That was all it took. He became animated and engaged in the conversation. "Salteñas are all over Bolivia," he said, "and you can't find the real ones here. Wait until you try mine." "Are you the GM?" "No, I'm the chef." It was Raul Claros. After a few more minutes, he went back into the kitchen, then came out and handed me a bag. He said, "Here you go, sir. You're about to have salteñas like you've never had before." His confidence bordered on cockiness. And he was right. El Pike's have been very good in the past; La Caraqueña's were fantastic - the best I've ever eaten. And yet, the dining room was empty. My friends, I cannot vouch for the rest of this menu, but after Warren and Todd raved about the arepas, can there be much doubt about them? I propose a $20 Tuesday, sooner rather than later, at La Caraqueña. I am utterly intrigued from what little I've seen, am going back for a more thorough exploration very soon, and have a feeling that this little restaurant is doing something very important, in a small-scale way. Please try it and give us your impressions. Cheers, Rocks.
  15. Is it just me, or does it seem like there is a lot of restaurant closings over the past 3 months? Seems like everytime I tune into DR.com, Facebook, Eater, etc... there is another announcement of a place closing down. More so than I can ever remember in the past.... I can only offer my sentiments to those that have had to close up shop....
  16. We had dinner at Addie's last night, and while it's still cute and one of the few non-chain, non-ethnic restaurants in Montgomery County, it has slipped, and slipped a lot, since were there last year. Addie's is a sentimental destination for us; we ate there the night before our daughter was born and as a parent it's hard to forget your last carefree, kid-free meal, before high chairs or babysitters become part of your life. There is an informal, cozy feel to the reataurant (located in a converted house), which is charming when the cooking rises to the level of the prices they are charging (apps $8-13, entrees $21-28), and the service is warm and polished as it has been in the past. When the food is pedestrian and the service unpolished, as it was last night, you are left to puzzle over what exactly was worth $80 a person. Addie's strength has been its appetizers, so it was shocking to look over the menu and not see a single appetizer or salad that appealed to me. I ended up ordering the field greens with Maytag Blue, walnuts, pears, and a slightly-too-sweet champagne vinaigrette. It was competently executed but almost every restaurant nowadays has this same salad on their menu. The soup was black bean with creme fraiche, which sounded perfect for lunch entree but too heavy for a dinner app. One of our friends had the mussels with tomato, shallots, and garlic. The mussels were very high quality, as I would expect from a Black restaurant but were overwhelmed by the amount of garlic in the sauce. Scott had a special, duck confit salad, which must have been good since he cleaned his plate. My entree was the "Black Pearl" salmon with Spanish chorizo rice, grilled rapini, apricot chutney, and Romesco sauce. The salmon was by far the best thing about the dish, lovely fresh and sweet and served medium. It went downhill from there. The rice tasted like it had been made hours before; it was dry and the slices of chorizo had been cooked until devoid of all juiciness and cut too small to impart much spice. The "grilled" rapini had never seen the grill, it was merely cooked until not quite done so that it was bitter and tough. The apricot chutney, of julienned dried apricot, pieces of kalamata (or a similar tasting) olive, and sliced toasted almonds, sounded intriguing and was what made me pick that particular entree, so it was disappointing that it never came together. It might have been better if the individual elements had been cut smaller and allowed to mingle maybe with some olive oil. As it was, one bite was sweet with just apricot, another salty with olive, but it was hard to get a bite that combined the flavors. The Romesco sauce combined better with the fish. I didn't taste anyone else's entree so can't comment on those. We drank a Malbec that was pleasant, fruit forward, not too heavy, and served much too warm. It worked with the fish but it would have been improved by a few minutes of chilling. The dessert menu offered cinnamon-chocolate ice cream, raspberry sorbet, apple crisp, some kind of chocolate mousse thing, and a carrot cake with creme anglais and caramel sauce. We opted for the carrot cake and it was tasty and suprisingly light, but needed more spice (cardamom would have been lovely in it), a little more frosting and a brighter sauce, maybe with lemon, to set off the richness. Little things would have improved the service. Letting us open the wine list before asking for our drink order. Replacing silver that had been taken away. Asking if we were done before clearing appetizers. Reciting the specials slowly, so that we could understand and not have to ask her repeat things. Bringing forks with our desserts. Asking "Are you finished?" rather than "Are you still working on that?" We had a pleasant evening with good friends that we hadn't seen in a long time, but expected more from Addie's. Not sure if we would go back.
  17. Lady KN and I were at Honey Pig Izakaya tonight -- we didn't see it specifically mentioned in the Honey Pig Multiple Locations thread, but if that's where it belongs, then please move it there...!) We were sort of aiming for Honey Pig, but ended up at Honey Pig Izakaya instead. We're glad we did -- less boisterous, lower music, no barbecue residue all over us. Owned by the same people as Honey Pig, they gladly took our Living Social coupon. We ordered around the menu and had way too much food, and just the right amount of beer, for what would have been $90 all in, four beers, tax and tip included. Seafood Pancake - Not as large as the one at To Sok Jip, and a bit on the greasy side, but quite good. We had two small wedges left over at the end and I picked through one of them to find about 75% octopus (or squid), and some flecks of white fish flake and shrimp pieces. Of course, lots of scallions too, with the green parts left in long slices and the white parts in very small disks. I would order this again. Grilled Whole Squid - A beautiful dish, about 8-9 inches long, 3 inches wide, perfectly browned and sliced in quarter-inch rings. Despite its appearance, the dish was otherwise a dud. It was quite chewy and had very little flavor. I would not order this again. Spicy Seafood and Tofu Stir Fry - Not too spicy, so I'm assuming they dumbed it down for us meeguks (learned that from Escoffier). The tofu was quite soft, and disintegrated as we picked through the dish. It had lots of octopus, which gave it a chewy mouthfeel, and some tender mussels (not enough for Lady KN's liking), shrimp and squid. I might order this dish again, only spicier. Sushi Special -- Deal of the night at 10 pieces of nigiri (or whatever the Korean word is) for $12.99. Eel, tuna, salmon, white fish, yellow tail, more or less. I would order this again. We perused the izakaya menu and promised to graze it on our next visit....
  18. Washingtonian is reporting that Andrew Evans, of Inn at Easton fame and owner of The BBQ Joint in Easton and Pasadena has signed a lease with Union Market. Sounds like the bbq will be counter service and the meat is being smoked at the Pasadena location and brought over to Union Market. Fair warning. December-ish opening. It's starting to get smokey around here.
  19. Mar 14, 2017 - "Bel-Loc Diner To Close March 26 after 53 Years" by Rachael Pacella on baltimoresun.com Note: Bel-Loc Diner has taken its place on the "Oldest Restaurants in the Baltimore and Annapolis Area" list.
  20. I drive Washington Blvd every day and just glanced over and noticed it this morning (same building as the marble and tile place). From what I can find it is a Persian take out spot. Does anyone have the scoop on this place? Why did they choose that name (is it a tribute to Timberlake and Samberg?!?!)? I consider myself a hardcore carnivore, but I can honestly say I didn't read the sign and think "Mmmmmmmmmm, meat in a box!" On the plus side, it is on the right side to make for an easy stop on the way home.
  21. Last Thursday my wife and I had dinner at Richard Sandoval's restaurant in Treasure Island in Las Vegas, Isla. This is similar to Zengo his restaurant which is scheduled to open this month in D. C. http://modernmexican.com/rs.htm Isla won the "best of Vegas" award for 2004 from Las Vegas magazine. His Denver outpost won a similar award from Denver magazine and his San Francisco restaurant is highly regarded. Maya, according to that harbinger of excellence and taste Zagat, in New York, is given 24 points for food ranking ahead of Rosa Mexicano and only two points behind the city's highest. Isla made me long for Rosa Mexicano. I am not a fan of Rosa Mexicano. Isla is known for tableside guacamole and 90+ tequilas. Costco has a remarkably good guacamole which is sold in translucent packets, four to the package. Each of these is superior to the green glop that we were served in Vegas. The chips that accompanied these were unusual in that they were considerably thicker, more irregular fried corn curiosities that neither of us cared for. Salsa that accompanied them was imaginatively presented on a two tiered bowl with the top tier housing three different salsas, the best of which was a watery chipotle. I am obsessed with tortilla soup. I have eaten this all over the United States from El Paso's Camino Real cafe (the best) to (insert name of city). From supermarkets to dumps which have never had another gringo stumble up to their counter to upscale white tablecloth Southwestern temples of hoity toity excellence I have pursued Great tortilla soup. The search did not stop in Las Vegas. Certainly not at Isla at Treasure Island. Shrimp ceviche was decent, several steps below the excellent ceviche at Coastal Flats or Guajillo. Queso fundido was good-but not as good as what we had at the nondescript Mexican at the Venetian the next night. A red snapper special disappointed while a boneless pork chop sauced with driblets of cream corn interspersed with mole was actually delicious-almost a Great dish! Side dishes of rice and pedestrian beans made me long for Rio Grande/Uncle Julio's though. A signature dessert which incorporated very good commercial Cinnamon ice cream and excellent bottled caramel was an appropriate finish to this $150 dinner for two. Three watered down "uptown" margeritas with Grand Marnier and top shelf tequila factored into this. What can I say? Las Vegas should have great Southwestern food-it's not that far from Phoenix or L. A. Albuequerque's Garduno's has an outpost there (benchmark guacamole and chili colorado that clears any nostril) as does Bobby Flay who some have called New York's best although I'm not certain what this means. Anyway, Isla/Zengo is coming here. My experience in Vegas was not one to make me stand in line on 7th street until it opens. Hopefully, because our standards are above those of Las Vegas (!) we will be gifted with a restaurant that lives up to the excellence Denver and Las Vegas magazines and Zagat honored their outposts for. Of course I am assuming that Denver, Las Vegas and New York know what exemplery Southwestern and Tex Mex should taste like. Perhaps remarkably, over the years, I have found that great Tex Mex is extremely difficult to find in these cities. San Francisco does have this. But I doubt that any of the taco trucks there which are truly excellent are listed in Zagat or any restaurant guide. And the several mom and pop restaurants in their version of our Riverdale are rarely written about in any review just as the best of Amarillo, Lubbock and El Paso are rarely reported in English in any publication. I have lowered my expectations for Zengo. I hope I am wrong to have done this.
  22. This restaurant opened up about 3 weeks ago, and not a review on Yelp or DR or anywhere that I can see. I went in a week ago to look at the menu. They had standard north Indian fare, a Sri Lankan menu, and oddly enough, a few Thai dishes. So, yesterday, I had not eaten all day and went over there to pick up some take out. It was only two of us, so we didn't get to try much, but I'll definitely go back to try more dishes. The place inside isn't much different than when it was Po Siam. I think some of the same decorations are up. I'm sure it will take some time. The bar area remains, but the alcohol does not. Wondering what their plan is going to be for that... I ordered off of the Sri Lankan section. Dhal Vede - "the quintessential street food of south India and Sri Lanka" (not my words, I just googled it). It's a small patty made of split yellow lentils, chilies, curry powder or leaves, chickpea flour. About 2-2.5 inches, circular. They are tasty and a nice snack. 3 in an order for $4. Eaten with tamarind sauce and cilantro sauce. Mutton Curry - deep brown color, meat on the bone, flavorful. My dining partner has some issues with spicy food, so we went with medium spice level. It was rich and I enjoyed it. It was $11-12 and not a very big portion. There was a fair amount of meat. Eggplant dish - I forgot the Indian name. Not too different than baingan bartha. It was good, but skin was on, and I don't always like that. Sorry, not super descriptive - feel like takeout is super hard to get a hold of. I liked it. I'm going to try as many of the other dishes as I can. Since Bombay Curry Company seems like it will never open, this is what we have for South Asian in the Del Ray area. At about 615p, it was nearly empty, save for one other person who came in for take out. She tried ordering a Thai dish. I hope people give it a chance.